Silent Night

( 27 )

Overview

Mary Higgins Clark, the "Queen of Suspense," has crafted a very special holiday story about a child's courage in the face of danger, and the power of love. Charged with menace and thrilling suspense, it is the #1 New York Times bestselling author's gift to readers for all seasons.

SILENT NIGHT

When Catherine Dornan's husband, Tom, is diagnosed with leukemia, she and their two young sons travel with him to New York during the holiday season for ...

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Silent Night

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Overview

Mary Higgins Clark, the "Queen of Suspense," has crafted a very special holiday story about a child's courage in the face of danger, and the power of love. Charged with menace and thrilling suspense, it is the #1 New York Times bestselling author's gift to readers for all seasons.

SILENT NIGHT

When Catherine Dornan's husband, Tom, is diagnosed with leukemia, she and their two young sons travel with him to New York during the holiday season for a lifesaving operation. On Christmas Eve, hoping to lift the boys' spirits, Catherine takes them to see Rockefeller Center's famous Christmas tree; while there, seven-year-old Brian notices a woman taking his mother's wallet. A St. Christopher medal tucked inside the wallet saved his grandfather's life in World War II, and Brian believes with all his heart that it will protect his father now. Impulsively, Brian follows the thief into the subway, and the most dangerous adventure of his young life begins. . . .

In New York for treatment of his father's leukemia, seven-year-old Brian Dornan sees his mother's wallet being lifted. Desperate to retrieve the St. Christopher medal tuked inside--which he believes to be protecting his father--Brian follows the thief into the subway, and into the most dangerous adventure of his young life.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The tense-but-tender tale of the most harrowing Christmas Eve any mother could imagine . . . with an ending that's nothing short of miraculous. We promise there won't be a dry eye in the house!" — Literary Guild

"Genuinely thrilling and suspenseful." — Detroit News

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Clark's favored theme of endangered kids Where Are the Children?, etc. meshes here with a parable of faith; but, despite swift pacing, the predictability of the story line undercuts the suspense. Catherine Dornan is in Manhattan with her two sons because her husband, Tom, an Omaha pediatrician, is hospitalized there for leukemia and has just had his spleen removed. When a troubled stranger, Cally Hunter, makes off with Catherine's wallet, seven-year-old Brian Dornan doggedly pursues her because the wallet contains a St. Christopher medal that saved the life of his grandfather in WWII, by deflecting a bullet. Brian believes that the medal will save his dad's life, too, as his grandmother has predicted, and he is determined to get it back. Enter Jimmy Siddons, Cally's brother, a cop killer escaped from Riker's Island prison, who abducts Brian, holding him hostage at gunpoint as he heads for Canada in a stolen car. In the finale, as Catherine prays during Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral, the cops and Siddons, Brian at his side, engage in a high-speed chase, in which the St. Christopher medal becomes vital to the boy's safety. Clark blatantly, if cleverly, pulls all the sentimental strings here, but most readers will find this a heartwarming, affirmative tale of the power of faith. 750,000 first printing; Literary Guild main selection; simultaneous S&S audiotape. Oct.
School Library Journal
YA-It is Christmas Eve in New York City when Brian, a determined seven year old, follows the thief who took his mother's wallet, hoping to retrieve the St. Christopher's medal that he believes will save his father, who has leukemia, just as it saved his grandfather in World War II. However, the child is kidnapped by a vicious escaped convict who needs a hostage. The central characters come to life rapidly as the fast-moving story quickly builds suspense. Teens will appreciate the realistic, paradoxical description of the relationship between Brian and his older brother: caring, concerned, and name-calling at the same time. Although readers know that the ending will be a happy one, they won't expect the coincidences and the touching holiday details.-Claudia Moore, W.T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA
Emily Melton
Clark's latest, a svelte 160 pages, crams lots of intensity and suspense into little space. The story is about seven-year-old Brian Dornan, whose leukemia-stricken dad is convalescing in a New York hospital. Brian, walking to the hospital with his mom, sees a woman pick up the wallet his mother has accidentally dropped. The wallet contains a St. Christopher medal that Brian is convinced will help make his dad okay again, so when the woman takes off, Brian follows. Unfortunately, the woman is Cally Hunter, sister of escaped convict Jimmy Siddons, who winds up taking Brian hostage. There's the requisite dose of what's-gonna-happen suspense and an ending that's smarmy and unsurprising, but Clark's legion of fans seem to tolerate those qualities easily. This smooth novelette is certain to be popular in spite of--or possibly because of--its tendency to sound like a cross between a Danielle Steel story and a TV movie.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671000424
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 11/1/1996
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 295,422
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 4.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Higgins Clark

Mary Higgins Clark, #1 international and New York Times bestselling author, has written thirty-three suspense novels; three collections of short stories; a historical novel, Mount Vernon Love Story; two children’s books, including The Magical Christmas Horse; and a memoir, Kitchen Privileges. She is also the coauthor with Carol Higgins Clark of five holiday suspense novels. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in the United States alone.

Biography

The Queen of Suspense, Bronx-born and -bred Mary Higgins Clark has achieved international success against heavy odds. Her father died when she was 11, and her mother struggled to raise and provide for Mary and her two brothers. Clark attended secretarial school after high school and worked for three years in an advertising agency before leaving to become a stewardess for Pan American Airlines. Throughout 1949, she flew international flights to Europe, Africa, and Asia. " I was in a revolution in Syria and on the last flight into Czechoslovakia before the Iron Curtain went down," she recalls. In 1950, she quit her job to marry Warren Clark, a neighbor nine years her senior whom she had known and admired since she was 16.

In the early years of her marriage, Clark began writing short stories, making her first sale in 1956 to Extension Magazine. Between writing and raising a family, the decade flew by. Then, in 1964, Warren Clark suffered a fatal heart attack, leaving his young widow with five children to support. She went to work writing radio scripts; and, around this time, she decided to try her hand at writing books. Inspired by a radio series she was working on, she drafted a biographical novel about George Washington. It was published in 1969 under the title Aspire to the Heavens. (In 2002, it was re-issued as Mount Vernon Love Story.) Her first suspense novel, Where Are the Children?, appeared in print in 1975. It was a huge hit and marked a turning point in her life. Since then, she has developed a loyal fan base, and each of her novels has hit the bestseller lists. She has also co-written stories and novels with her daughter Carol, a successful author in her own right.

In the 1970s, Clark enrolled in Fordham University at Lincoln Center, graduating summa cum laude in 1979. A great supporter of education, she has served as a trustee of her alma mater and Providence College and holds numerous honorary degrees. She remains active in Catholic affairs and has been honored with many awards. Her publisher, Simon & Schuster, funds an annual award in her name to be given to authors of suspense fiction writing in the Mary Higgins Clark tradition.

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    1. Hometown:
      Saddle River, New Jersey and New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 24, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      New York University; B.A., Fordham University, 1979
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt


From Chapter One

It was Christmas Eve in New York City. The cab slowly made its way down Fifth Avenue. It was nearly five o'clock. The traffic was heavy and the sidewalks were jammed with last-minute Christmas shoppers, homebound office workers, and tourists anxious to glimpse the elaborately trimmed store windows and the fabled Rockefeller Center Christmas tree.

It was already dark, and the sky was becoming heavy with clouds, an apparent confirmation of the forecast for a white Christmas. But the blinking lights, the sounds of carols, the ringing bells of sidewalk Santas, and the generally jolly mood of the crowd gave an appropriately festive Christmas Eve atmosphere to the famous thoroughfare.

Catherine Dornan sat bolt upright in the back of the cab, her arms around the shoulders of her two small sons. By the rigidity she felt in their bodies, she knew her mother had been right. Ten-year-old Michael's surliness and seven-year-old Brian's silence were sure signs that both boys were intensely worried about their dad.

Earlier that afternoon when she had called her mother from the hospital, still sobbing despite the fact that Spence Crowley, her husband's old friend and doctor, assured her that Tom had come through the operation better than expected, and even suggested that the boys visit him at seven o'clock that night, her mother had spoken to her firmly: "Catherine, you've got to pull yourself together," she had said. "The boys are so upset, and you're not helping. I think it would be a good idea if you tried to divert them for a little while. Take them down to Rockefeller Center to see the tree, then out to dinner. Seeing you so worried has practically convinced them that Tom will die."

This isn't supposed to be happening, Catherine thought. With every fiber of her being she wanted to undo the last ten days, starting with that terrible moment when the phone rang and the call came from St. Mary's Hospital. "Catherine, can you come right over? Tom collapsed while he was making his rounds."

Her immediate impression had been that there had to be a mistake. Lean, athletic, thirty-eight-year-old men don't collapse. And Tom always joked that pediatricians had birthright immunization to all the viruses and germs that arrived with their patients.

But Tom didn't have immunization from the leukemia that necessitated immediate removal of his grossly enlarged spleen. At the hospital they told her that he must have been ignoring warning signs for months. And I was too stupid to notice, Catherine thought as she tried to keep her lip from quivering.

She glanced out the window and saw that they were passing the Plaza Hotel. Eleven years ago, on her twenty-third birthday, they'd had their wedding reception at the Plaza. Brides are supposed to be nervous, she thought. I wasn't. I practically ran up the aisle.

Ten days later they'd celebrated little Christmas in Omaha, where Tom had accepted an appointment in the prestigious pediatrics unit of the hospital. We bought that crazy artificial tree in the clearance sale, she thought, remembering how Tom had held it up and said, "Attention Kmart shoppers..."

This year, the tree they'd selected so carefully was still in the garage, its branches roped together. They'd decided to come to New York for the surgery. Tom's best friend, Spence Crowley, was now a prominent surgeon at Sloan-Kettering.

Catherine winced at the thought of how upset she'd been when she was finally allowed to see Tom.

The cab pulled over to the curb. "Okay, here, lady?"

"Yes, fine," Catherine said, forcing herself to sound cheerful as she pulled out her wallet. "Dad and I brought you guys down here on Christmas Eve five years ago. Brian, I know you were too small, but Michael, do you remember?"

"Yes," Michael said shortly as he tugged at the handle on the door. He watched as Catherine peeled a five from the wad of bills in her wallet. "How come you have so much money, Mom?"

"When Dad was admitted to the hospital yesterday, they made me take everything he had in his billfold except a few dollars. I should have sorted it out when I got back to Gran's."

She followed Michael out onto the sidewalk and held the door open for Brian. They were in front of Saks, near the corner of Forty-ninth Street and Fifth Avenue. Orderly lines of spectators were patiently waiting to get a close-up look at the Christmas window display. Catherine steered her sons to the back of the line. "Let's see the windows, then we'll go across the street and get a better look at the tree."

Brian sighed heavily. This was some Christmas! He hated standing in line -- for anything. He decided to play the game he always played when he wanted time to pass quickly. He would pretend he was already where he wanted to be, and tonight that was in his dad's room in the hospital. He could hardly wait to see his dad, to give him the present his grandmother had said would make him get well.

Brian was so intent on getting on with the evening that when it was finally their turn to get up close to the windows, he moved quickly, barely noticing the scenes of whirling snowflakes and dolls and elves and animals dancing and singing. He was glad when they finally were off the line.

Then, as they started to make their way to the corner to cross the avenue, he saw that a guy with a violin was about to start playing and people were gathering around him. The air suddenly was filled with the sound of "Silent Night," and people began singing.

Catherine turned back from the curb. "Wait, let's listen for a few minutes," she said to the boys. Brian could hear the catch in her throat and knew that she was trying not to cry. He'd hardly ever seen Mom cry until that morning last week when someone phoned from the hospital and said Dad was real sick.

Copyright © 1995 by Mary Higgins Clark

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    Good book

    This was a good short read. This author always has something good to write about. Worth the read.

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  • Posted April 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good late night read!

    I found this book one day when I ran out of books to read. I forgot that I had it and had not read MHC in a while and though i would give it a try. I was pretty good. Some of her other books have been more interesting, but not bad for a late night reader. i enjoyed it. I would recommend it if you like MHC.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2006

    The Worlds Greatest Book of Suspense

    I think this was one of the best books that the '' Queen of Suspense'' has witten out ofall her other books. It had so much suspense in it that it made me want to read on and never want to put it down. She had a great topic to write about and it showed when I read it. I was absorved into the book and almost fell out of my seat. This book deserves every bit of these five stars because it was the #1 New York Times bestselling author book. Way to go Mary Higgins Clark.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2002

    A Holiday Sweeper

    A great book to read during the Holidays. I couldnt put the book down. MHC is one of my favorite authors and this is one of her best books that I have read! What a scary position to be in. All alone. I think he felt very confident though. The mom should have been a bit more careful with her purse being in another city. How afful to happen during the holidays! My prays go out to anyone in such a possition! Great Job MHC!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2001

    Young Brian's Christmas Holiday

    The book Silent Night by Mary Higgins Clark is very suspenseful, thrilling, surprising, and won't leave you with dry eyes. The book is great not only for Christmas, but for every season. The story starts when Catherine Dornan's husband, Tom, is diagnosed with leukemia. She and her two young sons travel with him to New York during the holiday season for a lifesaving operation. On Christmas Eve, hoping to lift the boys' spirits, she takes her sons to see their dad in the hospital, but stops to look at the famous Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center. Then seven-year-old Brian notices a woman taking his mother's wallet. There is a St. Christopher medal tucked inside the wallet that saved his grandfather's life in World War II, and he believes with all his heart that it will protect his father now. Brian then follows the thief into the subway, and the most dangerous adventure for young Brian begins. I liked how the book was suspenseful and made me emotional in parts of the book. The ending was very emotional and surprising. The title is not much of a eye-catcher, but like I've been taught, you can't judge a book by its cover. I didn't, and I enjoyed reading this book. I give this three stars out of five.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2000

    Not Her Best

    Not one of MHC's best. I found this book to be interesting, but, as other people have said, this novel was very predictable. If you have read other novels of hers, this novel was very easy to figure out from the beginning. I had only read one of her novels before reading this one. I found the first one to be great. I was not excited about reading another one after Silent Night, but decided to go ahead anyway due to the fact that I love to read. I found the next book that I read by her, You Belong to Me, to be the best book I had ever read. Silent Night is very predictable. It's not one of her better novels. After reading this book, do not give up on MHC. I didn't, and I am very pleased with her writing. I will definitely continue to read her novels.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2000

    Predictable

    I have enjoyed every one of Clark's books I have read thus far, but this one was disappointing because it was too simple.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2000

    Not the best book in the world.

    Okay, I understand that some people may like this book for some reason or another. However, I read this book in one night and I predicted the entire thing. There was not one suspenseful part of this book. Even the very end was completely obvious. This is the first Clark book I have ever read, and I know it will be my last. It would be okay if I was a seventh grader reading it. But I am an adult who actually has a brain to figure books out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2000

    Silent Night-Mary Higgins Clark

    This novel by Mary Higgins Clark is a great holiday season story that is easy to read and very enjoyable. If you want a book that you can sit down and read in only one night, this is the story for you. Brian, a small boy who finds himself in a lot of trouble, is just trying to help his father and the rest of his family. It shows the loyalty and responsibility of this boy throughout the story. Also, this would be perfect reading for any time of the year, not just the holiday season.

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    Posted June 21, 2011

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted January 9, 2011

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    Posted October 10, 2011

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    Posted February 14, 2011

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