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Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage
     

Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage

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by Kay Bratt
 

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“An eye-opening account of life in China’s orphanages. Kay Bratt vividly details the conditions and realities faced by Chinese orphans in an easy-to-read manner that draws the reader in to the heart-wrenching moments she has experienced in her work to bring hope to these children.”—Dan Cruver, cofounder and director of Together for Adoption

Overview

“An eye-opening account of life in China’s orphanages. Kay Bratt vividly details the conditions and realities faced by Chinese orphans in an easy-to-read manner that draws the reader in to the heart-wrenching moments she has experienced in her work to bring hope to these children.”—Dan Cruver, cofounder and director of Together for Adoption

When her family relocated to rural China in 2003, Kay Bratt was thrust into a new world, one where boys were considered more valuable than girls and poverty and the one-child policy had created an epidemic of abandoned infants. As a volunteer at a local orphanage, Bratt witnessed conditions that were unfathomable to a middle-class mother of two from South Carolina.

Based on Bratt’s diary of her four years working at the orphanage, Silent Tears offers a searing account of young lives rendered disposable. In the face of an implacable system, Bratt found ways to work within (and around) the rules to make a better future for the children, whom she came to love. Her story balances the sadness and struggles of life in the orphanage with moments of joy, optimism, faith, and victory. It is the story of hundreds of children—and one woman who never planned on becoming a hero but became one anyway.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781438238166
Publisher:
CreateSpace
Publication date:
07/03/2008
Pages:
430
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.08(d)

Meet the Author

Kay Bratt grew up in the Midwest as the child of a broken home and later, a survivor of abuse. Facing these obstacles in her own life instilled in Kay a passionate drive to fight for those that had been dealt an unfair hand. Upon arriving in China on an expatriate assignment with her husband in 2003, she was immediately drawn to the cause of China's forgotten orphans. Moved beyond tears by the stories of these children, she promised to give them the voice they did not have. In 2008, she self-published her memoir Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage to do just that.

With the help of her readers, Kay continues to raise awareness and advocate for at-risk children. In China, she was honored with the 2006 Pride of the City award for her humanitarian work. She is the founder of the Mifan Mommy Club, an online organization which provides rice for children in China's orphanages, and is also an active volunteer with Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for abused and neglected children. Kay currently resides in Georgia with her husband and daughter.

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Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a must read book for parents who have adopted from China.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book tells how it is in these kind of places. It is sad but I am thankful for all the people that adopt these children.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think the author detracts from the story of these helpless children by interjecting too much about herself. She sort of trumpets her own benevolence to the point the story takes on a veiled "Thank God for the kids I was there" kind of tone, which I found distasteful. Contrasting the stark horror of starving infants and abused children are overly aggrandized personal trials and tribulations such as difficulty finding vanilla to bake homemade cookies, her back pain, difficulty communicating with her maid, etc. I wish I'd have borrowed the book or at least not paid full price.