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Silver Tales: Book One
     

Silver Tales: Book One

by Marjaree Mayne
 

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Remember the 1950’s and 1960’s? Whether you do or don’t remember those days from personal experience, you will love the stories of Silver Tales, written by the people who grew up back then. Silver Tales are biographies written anonymously by the people who lived the stories and who now bravely venture forth to tell all!

If you

Overview

Remember the 1950’s and 1960’s? Whether you do or don’t remember those days from personal experience, you will love the stories of Silver Tales, written by the people who grew up back then. Silver Tales are biographies written anonymously by the people who lived the stories and who now bravely venture forth to tell all!

If you believe those olden days to be all fun and games, poodle skirts and hot rods with dice, and diners with jukeboxes filled with laughing teen-agers, then you need to read Silver Tales: Book One to see the darker side of growing up in those times.

These wonderful stories, written by the people who lived through them and edited by Ms. Mayne, will make you laugh, cry and remember. They will also make you gasp in horror. Take a walk into history and read through the stories that will touch your heart, please your soul and jog your memory. Barbara: The girl who grew into womanhood wanting nothing more than to get even and hurt her father as he had hurt her.

Lauren: A little girl raped by her brother, who as a woman saw all men as her brother.

Gloria: A child raised by her parents under a strict Catholic upbringing to become a frigid grown woman.

Penelope: Raised to believe in a Cinderella life, who as an adult faced the reality of a husband as well as a secret lover.

Maria: Forced to grow up with an abusive mother who made her life so unhappy that as an adult is now a manic-depressive.

Editorial Reviews

Patricia (Trisha) Moore

Just imagine yourself sitting in a bright, cheery kitchen, drinking coffee with your next-door neighbor, who waxes suddenly nostalgic and starts recalling incidents from his or her childhood.  Then, your friend steps back even farther in time, and seems compelled to relate to you all the events, momentous and not-so-momentous, that shaped their life. 

This is the grist of the Silver Tales series.  In Book One, Ms. Mayne has collected five unique, though eerily similar, autobiographical stories, written by everyday people over the age of fifty, with very different backgrounds.  They each went through some part of their formative years in the so-called idyllic "Fabulous Fifties" - the rock-'n-roll era.

There's Lauren, born and raised on a Midwestern farm, as many were in the late thirties in America's agriculturally-based economy.  She was victimized by her own brother when only ten, lost her mother a few years later, along with several grandparents and even school teachers.  She spent the rest of her teenage years living with one older sister or another.  See how her trials forged the steel by which she survived and surmounted all her difficulties.

Then we come to Barbara.  The city girl.  Born on the East Coast, who is devastated to learn that not only does her father have a larcenous soul and supports his family with ill-gotten gains, he has been living a double life with two families.  She vows revenge, and in the process of trying to get back at her father, hurts herself even more. 

Next is Gloria.  The "good Catholic girl" from California who, for all the right reasons, marries the wrong man, her childhood sweetheart.  She soon realizes she has never been "in love" with her husband and their sex life is a chore; but her up-bringing frowns on divorce, so she stays in a loveless marriage, at least loveless on her part.  After his untimely death, that remarkable thing we call the internet brings her a new love, who awakens in her all those things she has only read about.  Ironically, she learns in the end that her new love never really cared for her, and she is left alone, once again.  But her faith gives her the strength to accept the things she cannot change and to look forward.

Now enters Penelope.  The little spitfire from New Jersey, who survives the grueling childhood provided by her autocratic father, only to marry the same kind of man.  After years of being a virtual prisoner in her own home, she insists on, and is surprisingly allowed by her husband, to get some additional schooling.  Then, upon learning that all these years he has been cheating on her, she begins an affair of her own.  Caught between her beliefs and her feelings, she ping-pongs between her husband and her lover.

Finally, we have Paula, whose mother was a tyrant, in the darkest meaning of that word.  Her mother's personality was forever changed by her harrowing experiences during World War II in Europe.  Unfortunately, those changes wreaked havoc on Paula's young life.  She gained priceless training in scrimping, saving, cooking and cleaning, but nothing whatsoever about how to love and be loved.  But love found her, anyway.

After reading just one of these stories, you will soon learn that the Fifties were not all that they professed to be.  They were much, much more.  And I am pleased to say that Book One of the Silver Tales series is just that, the first one.  There are other volumes waiting in the wings.  As for me - I just can't stand the waiting.
Biographical

Library Journal
As the average age of Americans slowly rises, libraries will need responsive collections. Herrick (Boise: A Global Community in the West) celebrates the collective joys and hard-learned wisdom of femininity in lush, poetic prose that often borders on precious. Although confident ("I am nothing but adrenaline and exuberance"), she does not provide how-to. The final chapter should have come first, as it explains that Herrick can't have children. Bolton used to write jokes for comedic greats Bob Hope and Phyllis Diller; her riffs on life for seniors wouldn't be out of place in the Catskills. Though packed with funny quips and one-liners (e.g., use menopausal hot flashes as an energy source), her book mainly consists of monologs, the last couple of which grow mawkish. On the whole, however, this favorably recalls Erma Bombeck's irreverence. Mayne, the author of several thrillers, has collected the autobiographies of five women who came of age in the 1950s and 1960s. Some were particularly abused, and the flood of misery that their stories unleashes only serves to document how awful life could be for women at that time. Unfortunately, themes of life lessons learned are lost in the mire of broken love stories, childhood horrors, and drunken, philandering husbands. Sewell's anthology is more incisive by comparison, revealing how 27 middle-aged women writers just "be" (as opposed to how they once were and what they took for that). While some of the essays pack a punch, most tend toward mundane, e.g., Dorothy Walls's poignant essay about masking beauty lines behind plastic surgery. Maturity has netted these authors grace, courage, and "meaning deeper than skin," but their messages are all too familiar. There is no lack of feminista-writers-on-writing books, including Jocelyn Burrell's compilation Word: On Being a (Woman) Writer. Geriatric psychologist Solie does an excellent job of debunking the myth that our elders are merely older versions of ourselves. Seniors are undergoing a developmental transition akin to adolescence; practical, effective communication methods are presented to help minimize generational conflict. This, in turn, paves the way for the important work of advocating for (instead of marginalizing) elders, who face a daily struggle for control. Though an age group isn't numerically defined (it's more a life stage), this makes an important contribution to our cultural understanding of "seniors" and is highly recommended for public libraries and professional collections. Bolton's, Herrick's, and Sewell's books are optional; Mayne's is not recommended. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
The Press Of Atlantic City
These stories celebrate life's trials and tribulations as well as mistakes and triumphs.
— Joyce Vanaman,
The Midwest Book Review
Each of the ladies has a driving spirit that keeps them going. Their lives are inspirational.
The Press Of Atlantic City - Joyce Vanaman
These stories celebrate life's trials and tribulations as well as mistakes and triumphs.
Midwest Book Review
Each of the ladies has a driving spirit that keeps them going. Their lives are inspirational.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595230235
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/18/2002
Pages:
464
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.03(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Marjaree Mayne is a published and accomplished writer of psycho thrillers, having majored in Psychology and Deviant Behavior. She lives in Monroe Township, New Jersey.

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