Silver Treasure: Myths and Legends of the World by Geraldine McCaughrean, Nigel Lambert |, Audiobook (Cassette) | Barnes & Noble
Silver Treasure: Myths and Legends of the World

Silver Treasure: Myths and Legends of the World

by Geraldine McCaughrean, Nigel Lambert
     
 
A beautiful collection of stories from far and wide by a master storyteller

This silver treasure of twenty-three myths and legends contains the well-loved tales of such legendary figures as King Arthur and William Tell, as well as the Russian Christmas legend "Babushka"; a story about mining for silver in Bolivia; a Japanese tale of a girl who falls in love with a

Overview

A beautiful collection of stories from far and wide by a master storyteller

This silver treasure of twenty-three myths and legends contains the well-loved tales of such legendary figures as King Arthur and William Tell, as well as the Russian Christmas legend "Babushka"; a story about mining for silver in Bolivia; a Japanese tale of a girl who falls in love with a lighthouse keeper; and the Alaskan Merit myth of "The Raven and the Moon".

As they did in The Golden Hoard, their previous, highly acclaimed collection of myths and legends of the world, Geraldine McCaughrean and Bee Willey have drawn on the background culture of each story to create brilliantly retold and exquisitely illustrated stories in a way that everyone will enjoy.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this offbeat volume of four Lear verses, Willey (The Golden Hoard: Myths and Legends of the World) conjures a dream-realm of dark skies and vaguely unearthly animals. Asymmetrical windows of rich color imagery open on the white negative space of each page, next to unembellished text. "The Owl and the Pussycat," "The Jumblies" and "The Pobble Who Has No Toes" take place on a violet-green sea dotted with flecks of white foam and populated by ethereal starfish and minnows. Willey's folk style takes its cue from Chagall: the Pobble's Aunt Jobiska is an enigmatically smiling peasant woman in a purple babushka; the green-headed (but otherwise human-looking) Jumblies exude a magical calmness as they blithely sail their sieve; and the yellow calf in "The Quangle-Wangle's Hat" has a human's lidded eyes and rosy cheeks. The book seems incomplete without "The Dong with a Luminous Nose"; the doleful Dong is relegated to a mere mention in "Quangle Wangle," and Willey portrays the character as a white quail, not as the boyish type that Lear himself drew for the role. This departure notwithstanding, Willey, with her eerie interpretations, conveys the classic nonsense author's spirit of eccentricity. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) FYI: Willey's fans can also look forward to a companion volume to The Golden Hoard; the new book, The Silver Treasure: Myths and Legends of the World, also by Geraldine McCaughrean, illus. by Willey, is due from S&S/McElderry in April ($19.95 ISBN 0-689-81322-8, ages 10-up).
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
As they did in their previous collaboration for the award winning book, The Golden Hoard, author and artist have presented a new collection that includes a few favorites such as "The Tower of Babel," "William Tell," "Rip Van Winkle," plus quite a few tales not so widely known. Particularly moving is the opening story "The Silver-Miners" which tells of the oppressed natives in Bolivia forced to desecrate their land in search of silver for the harsh Spanish conquerors. The mountain Parichata gives away its silver to save the people and the land. This collection of 23 stories will transport readers all over the world introducing a wonderful variety of cultures.
VOYA - Roxy Ekstrom
Another winner from McCaughrean. First came Greek Myths (McElderry, 1993), then The Golden Hoard (also illustrated by Willey) (McElderry, 1996), and now The Silver Treasure, and it truly is a treasure. I began reading this as a librarian and soon discovered that the storyteller in me had taken over. I could visualize telling these tales, and by the time I finished the book it bristled with yellow notes marking stories to add to my repertoire. These twenty-three myths and legends are thoughtfully presented, introducing stories not usually found together in a collection. But storytellers and mythology readers are not the only audience. English and foreign language teachers will find classroom fodder here, and it also can be used for spicing up the curriculum in American history, world history, and "comparative" classes. The language flows gracefully. "The star shone-but then everything in Babushka's house shone," begins the Russian legend of Babushka, drawing one deep into the story. The religious myths, ranging from St. Christopher to Muhammad to Krishna to Re, are skillfully done and can easily be used in secular settings. The reader travels from Togo to Hawaii to Japan then on to Europe. The Greek myth of Pygmalion, told in A Heart of Stone, the heroics of Wilhelm Tell, and the Tlingit legend Ash are beautifully retold in today's language. The only fault with the book is the brevity of notes about the stories; most were just a sentence or two. Illus. Source Notes. VOYA Codes: 5Q 2P M J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written, For the YA with a special interest in the subject, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9 and Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4 UpThese tales are truly marvelsin both their meaningful content and in the teller's lyrical mastery of language. "The Harp of Dagda" is representative of the selections: it has a plot laced with adventure, a larger-than-life hero, a touch of magic, and an underlying message (here, about the power of art, the "web of captured dreams"). World culture has been ransacked for these valuables, mostly unknown (like the Hawaiian pig-faced god who courts the fire goddess, Pele, by slanging her in an insult contest), but even the known are so artfully retold that Rip Van Winkle and Sir Patrick Spens are given a new lease on life. The pictures are lively, amusing vignettes that do not compete with the superior text. A lapse in the source notes for a King Arthur story moves the Saxons back a thousand years, from A.D. 500 to 500 B.C. However, this criticism is an insignificant speck of tarnish on a truly gleaming collection.Patricia Lothrop Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI
Kirkus Reviews
A lovely companion volume to The Golden Hoard (1996), with 23 myths, legends, and stories—some familiar, others less so—from a wide variety of cultures. McCaughrean retells the stories of the Tower of Babel, King Arthur's death, and Rip Van Winkle, among others; also included is a Kenyan myth about "The Men in the Moon," a Hawaiian tale called "The Pig Goes Courting" about the battle between a pig-god and a volcano goddess, and an Irish story of the origins of the little people known as the fairies of Ireland. The prose often approaches poetry: King Arthur's "barge moved silently out across the lake, to be swallowed up by scarves of mist, curtains of diaphanous moonlight, hangings of velvet night." A Russian story, "Babushka," is particularly affecting, but all are ideal for bedtime or reading aloud. The illustrations are less successful: Willey's palette is vivid, often to the point of garishness, and many of the characters have brash scarlet cheeks and resemble dolls with too much rouge. Endnotes on the stories are more arbitrary than useful, but the resonant retellings make this a valuable collection.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780745173900
Publisher:
BBC Audiobooks America
Publication date:
11/01/1997
Edition description:
Unabridged

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