Simisola (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #16)

Simisola (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #16)

4.5 2
by Ruth Rendell
     
 

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In the quiet Sussex country town of Kingsmarkham,  the daughter of Nigerian physician Raymond Akande  is missing. "It's probably nothing, "  says Dr. Akande to his friend and client Chief  Inspector Wexford, whose help he enlists.  

But the days that follow prove the doctor  dreadfully wrong. A

Overview

In the quiet Sussex country town of Kingsmarkham,  the daughter of Nigerian physician Raymond Akande  is missing. "It's probably nothing, "  says Dr. Akande to his friend and client Chief  Inspector Wexford, whose help he enlists.  

But the days that follow prove the doctor  dreadfully wrong. A young woman is found  murdered not Melanie, but the last person to have seen and  spoken to her. A second woman's body is discovered,  again not Melanie's, but like her, young and  black. A third woman turns up beaten and unconscious;  like the others, she is of Nigerian origin. As  Inspector Wexford's investigation stretches from  days into weeks, it becomes his unhappy obligation to  counter the hopes of the doctor and his wife. In  Wexford's professional opinion, Melanie, like the  other young women, has become the victim of a  serial killer with a horrifyingly singular objective.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In her 17th mystery starring Chief Inspector Wexford (after Kissing the Gunner's Daughter), Rendell casts a decidedly baleful eye on changes in the Sussex country town of Kingsmarkham and its people-the appearance of slums, the rise of decidedly fascistic attitudes and growing unemployment and hopelessness among the young. Against this dour backdrop, Raymond Akande, a thriving black doctor, comes to Wexford with a problem: his 22-year-old daughter has disappeared. Wexford, as patient and friend (a somewhat uneasy friend, because a ``decent'' Englishman of his generation cannot quite get used to blacks), feels bound to help. He uncovers a dark train of events: a girl who was apparently the last to see Melanie Akande alive is strangled; the body of another young black woman is found buried in the woods; and a sturdy Nigerian crossing guard is pushed down the stairs in her apartment block. Meanwhile, a flashy Arab lady running for the local council seems to be attempting to ensnare Wexford, and there is a mystery concerning one of her Filipino servants. The events are put together so methodically and believably, while the drawing of character and setting is so exact, that the book seems at times like a contemporary Middlemarch with a murder mystery at the heart of it. The solution is truly astonishing yet as logical as the rest of this splendid, passionately fair-minded and deeply disturbing novel-in which Rendell surpasses even herself. (Sept.)
Joyce Carol Oates
"One of the finest practioners of the craft in English-speaking world.....even within the crowded, competitative and fecund world of career mystery writers, Ruth Rendell is recognized as a phenonemon....." -- The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440222026
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1996
Series:
Chief Inspector Wexford Series , #16
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 6.80(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are saying about this

Elmore Leonard
"I love the way she writes."

Meet the Author

Ruth Rendell is the recipient of several awards, including three Edgars and four Gold Daggers from the UK's Crime Writers' Association. Simisola, Blood Lines, Keys to the Street, and The Brimstone Wedding (written as Barbara Vine) are available from Brilliance Audio. She lives in England.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
February 17, 1930
Place of Birth:
London, England
Education:
Loughton County High School for Girls, Essex

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Simisola 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slow-starting, agonizing writing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fine writing, interesting local color, good story...my only comlpaint: there are too many characters, hard to keep track of them all...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago