Simon and Schuster's Guide to Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Fishes

( 1 )

Overview

A guide for beginners and experts alike, Simon & Schuster's Guide to Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Fishes is the most useful book an aquarium enthusiast can own. Whether you are interested in goldfish, guppies, or the most exotic marine species, the opening section on starting an aquarium covers everything you need to know. Illustrated in color throughout, the 295 entries cover plants, amphibia, reptiles, and invertebrates as well as aquarium fishes. Each entry provides the common name, scientific name, and ...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.14
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$17.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (128) from $1.99   
  • New (16) from $1.99   
  • Used (112) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

A guide for beginners and experts alike, Simon & Schuster's Guide to Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Fishes is the most useful book an aquarium enthusiast can own. Whether you are interested in goldfish, guppies, or the most exotic marine species, the opening section on starting an aquarium covers everything you need to know. Illustrated in color throughout, the 295 entries cover plants, amphibia, reptiles, and invertebrates as well as aquarium fishes. Each entry provides the common name, scientific name, and family; distribution of the species in the wild; a description of shape, color, and size; information about sexual differences, feeding habits, reproduction, compatibility with other species, and much more. Next to each entry are easy-to-read symbols that indicate the proper water temperature, pH, and illumination.
This comprehensive guide gives you all the information you need to maintain a beautiful, balanced, and thriving aquarium.

This guide for aquarium enthusiasts provides detailed information necessary to help you prepare a balanced and healthy aquarium environment.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671228095
  • Publisher: Touchstone
  • Publication date: 7/28/1977
  • Series: Nature Guide Series
  • Pages: 337
  • Sales rank: 1,443,438
  • Product dimensions: 4.50 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

1 DWARF SEDGE

Acorus gramineus

Var. pusillus and var. variegatus

Family Araceae.

Distribution Japan; the variety variegatus is of horticultural origin.

Description Acorus gramineus is a shrubby plant, 10-12 in (25-30 cm) in height, with long, narrow, ribbonlike leaves, slightly curved when at maximum length. It is an amphibious marsh plant which, however, can adapt to underwater life in an aquarium. Var. pusillus, with short, rigid leaves 1 1/2-4 in (4-10 cm) high, and var. variegatus, with leaves reaching 16-20 in (40-50 cm) and bearing yellow streaks, are more common than the original form.

Propagation Through division of the tufts or the rhizome (the fleshy underwater stem) by cutting their tips and planting the base of the stem immediately in shallow water, whose depth is then gradually increased.

Environment Temperature: 59-68°F (15-20°C), best at 65°F (18°C). pH: neutral. Water hardness: soft. Illumination: moderate to normal. Soil: No particular requirements; clay or clay with peat.

Note The dwarf variety of Acorus is commonly used in small aquaria.

2 ALTERNANTHERA SESSILIS

Alternanthera sessilis

Family Amaranthaceae.

Distribution Humid or sporadically flooded areas of the Old World.

Description Perennial plant, always partly immersed in its natural habitat, but well suited to life underwater in the aquarium. Its stalks are very branched and characteristically red, The leaves are stalkless, lanceolate, up to 2 3/8-2 3/4 in (6-7 cm) long and 3/8 in (1 cm) wide. The upper surface is variously colored from dark green to wine red, and the lower side is always bright red.

Propagation Very simple, by cutting.

Environment Temperature: 60-72°F (16-22°C), possibly somewhat less. pH: near neutrality. Water hardness: medium. Illumination: Normal to intense, even if artificial. Soil: sand and rock, possibly with the addition of fertilizer.

3 ANUBIAS LANCEOLATA

Anubias lanceolata

Family Araceae. The genus Anubias contains six species.

Distribution Tropical Africa.

Description Perennial plant with a fleshy underwater stem over 15 3/4 in (40 cm) high in its natural habitat, seldom higher than 11 3/4 in (30 cm) in an aquarium. The leaves are lanceolate, rather blunt at the tip, 4-4 3/4 in (10-12 cm) long and 1 3/16-2 in (3-5 cm) wide, dark green, with long stalks and leathery blades, concave on the upper side.

Propagation Very slow, by division of tufts.

Environment Temperature: this species requires high temperatures, between 68°F (20°C) and 86°F (30°C), best at 77°F (25°C). pH: neutral or, if possible, slightly acid. Water hardness: average to soft. Illumination: low-level. This species grows naturally in rain forests, where light levels are low. Soil: no particular requirements, but preferably sandy.

Note Anubias lanceolata is an excellent plant to use in warm aquaria. Its only drawback lies in its slow rate of growth.

4 LACELEAF PLANT

Aponogeton fenestralis

Family Aponogetonaceae. The name of the genus is derived from two Greek words — apon (water) and geiton (close to).

Distribution Madagascar.

Description Oblong leaves, 5 7/8-7 7/8 in (15-20 cm) long, characteristically lacking spongy tissue and therefore consisting only of a network of veins.

Propagation By division of offshoots; less commonly by seed.

Environment Temperature: 60-68°F (16-20°C) with possible extremes of 57°F (14°C) and 76°F (24°C); undisturbed, frequently renewed water, pH: 6-8, or neutral. Water hardness: soft to medium. Illumination: normal, preferably diffuse and artificial. Soil: mainly large-grained sand, and a little mud.

Note Cultivation of this plant is difficult; during the period of winter dormancy, the water temperature must be maintained around 55°F (13°C).

Copyright © 1976 by Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milano

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Introduction

Plants

Freshwater Fishes

Marine Fishes

Amphibians and Reptiles

Freshwater Invertebrates

Marine Invertebrates

Glossary

Index

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter 1

1 DWARF SEDGE
Acorus gramineus
Var. pusillus and var. variegatus

Family Araceae.

Distribution Japan; the variety variegatus is of horticultural origin.

Description Acorus gramineus is a shrubby plant, 10-12 in (25-30 cm) in height, with long, narrow, ribbonlike leaves, slightly curved when at maximum length. It is an amphibious marsh plant which, however, can adapt to underwater life in an aquarium. Var. pusillus, with short, rigid leaves 1 1/2-4 in (4-10 cm) high, and var. variegatus, with leaves reaching 16-20 in (40-50 cm) and bearing yellow streaks, are more common than the original form.

Propagation Through division of the tufts or the rhizome (the fleshy underwater stem) by cutting their tips and planting the base of the stem immediately in shallow water, whose depth is then gradually increased.

Environment Temperature: 59-68°F (15-20°C), best at 65°F (18°C). pH: neutral. Water hardness: soft. Illumination: moderate to normal. Soil: No particular requirements; clay or clay with peat.

Note The dwarf variety of Acorus is commonly used in small aquaria.

2 ALTERNANTHERA SESSILIS
Alternanthera sessilis

Family Amaranthaceae.

Distribution Humid or sporadically flooded areas of the Old World.

Description Perennial plant, always partly immersed in its natural habitat, but well suited to life underwater in the aquarium. Its stalks are very branched and characteristically red, The leaves are stalkless, lanceolate, up to 2 3/8-2 3/4 in (6-7 cm) long and 3/8 in (1cm) wide. The upper surface is variously colored from dark green to wine red, and the lower side is always bright red.

Propagation Very simple, by cutting.

Environment Temperature: 60-72°F (16-22°C), possibly somewhat less. pH: near neutrality. Water hardness: medium. Illumination: Normal to intense, even if artificial. Soil: sand and rock, possibly with the addition of fertilizer.

3 ANUBIAS LANCEOLATA
Anubias lanceolata

Family Araceae. The genus Anubias contains six species.

Distribution Tropical Africa.

Description Perennial plant with a fleshy underwater stem over 15 3/4 in (40 cm) high in its natural habitat, seldom higher than 11 3/4 in (30 cm) in an aquarium. The leaves are lanceolate, rather blunt at the tip, 4-4 3/4 in (10-12 cm) long and 1 3/16-2 in (3-5 cm) wide, dark green, with long stalks and leathery blades, concave on the upper side.

Propagation Very slow, by division of tufts.

Environment Temperature: this species requires high temperatures, between 68°F (20°C) and 86°F (30°C), best at 77°F (25°C). pH: neutral or, if possible, slightly acid. Water hardness: average to soft. Illumination: low-level. This species grows naturally in rain forests, where light levels are low. Soil: no particular requirements, but preferably sandy.

Note Anubias lanceolata is an excellent plant to use in warm aquaria. Its only drawback lies in its slow rate of growth.

4 LACELEAF PLANT
Aponogeton fenestralis

Family Aponogetonaceae. The name of the genus is derived from two Greek words -- apon (water) and geiton (close to).

Distribution Madagascar.

Description Oblong leaves, 5 7/8-7 7/8 in (15-20 cm) long, characteristically lacking spongy tissue and therefore consisting only of a network of veins.

Propagation By division of offshoots; less commonly by seed.

Environment Temperature: 60-68°F (16-20°C) with possible extremes of 57°F (14°C) and 76°F (24°C); undisturbed, frequently renewed water, pH: 6-8, or neutral. Water hardness: soft to medium. Illumination: normal, preferably diffuse and artificial. Soil: mainly large-grained sand, and a little mud.

Note Cultivation of this plant is difficult; during the period of winter dormancy, the water temperature must be maintained around 55°F (13°C).

Copyright © 1976 by Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milano

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 1
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2001

    Uninformative

    This book was my first marine aquarium literature purchase. I wanted to be a well-informed marine aquariust and thought this book would give me a fairly-comprehensive list of species and solid information regarding those species. I was sorely disappointed. This book gives much recognition towards some species, but fails to mention even some of the most essential fish in the aquatic trade. The family Gobioid, comprised of over 2,100 known species and a constant in the aquatics business, gets one mention! The bumblebee goby is named. The entire rest of the family, 100 of which are aquarium-household-names, are not even given a sniff. However, the Butterfly fish, 120 known species, and Angelfish, 74 known species, get 22 mentions. Are these fish remarkably more beautiful, easier to care for, more lovable, and more popular than gobies? No, but at someone Simon and Schuster thought so. This book gives no information on how to care for one's fish. When opened, the book displays species' care on the left and a picture on the right. And here some credit should be given, whoever took the pictures deserves credit because they are remakably well-done. But, the majority of the species care is devoted to a description of the fish, the same fish that stares you right in the face on the opposite page. Feeding and Compatibility, the most important parts of fish-keeping get small, uncomprehensible blurbs. Feed: 'All sorts of live food and meat.' What types of meat? Steak? Horse? And should I feed my mother-in-law to the fish? She's alive. When published in 1976, this book was, perhaps, very state-of-the-art, but now it seems more useless than a horse carriage in downtown LA. The hobby/science of keeping fish has evolved since then and the sea of antiquacy has washed over this poor relic. Your money could be better spent elsewhere if you wish to run an aquarium that is a healthy environment.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)