Since Yesterday: The 1930's in America, September 3, 1929-September 3, 1939

Since Yesterday: The 1930's in America, September 3, 1929-September 3, 1939

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by Frederick Lewis Allen
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0060913223

ISBN-13: 9780060913229

Pub. Date: 07/16/1986

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

"Vividly and with great skills he marshals the men, the mountebanks, the measures, and the events of ten years of American life and causes them to march before us in orderly panathenaic procession."—Saturday Review

Overview

"Vividly and with great skills he marshals the men, the mountebanks, the measures, and the events of ten years of American life and causes them to march before us in orderly panathenaic procession."—Saturday Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060913229
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/16/1986
Series:
Harper Perennial
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
247,485
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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Since Yesterday: The 1930's in America, September 3, 1929-September 3, 1939 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
LilacDreams More than 1 year ago
Everything you may want to know about the 1930s. Since Yesterday picks up where Only Yesterday (about the 1920s) left off. The Great Depression makes this decade depressing. Herbert Hoover worked unceasingly to get America back on track, but the depression was beyond his control. FDR's administration ridiculed him, but then acted the same way. Among the tidbits: a boom in miniature golf; increased library circulation as people tried to understand the times; with servants dismissed, wives who had never done their own work were now cooking and scrubbing; people stayed in school because there was no job waiting for them; women's styles went back to longer hems and less severe hair; the five-day work week,; the Dust Bowl caused by long-time human error, followed by floods in the east; expanding air conditioning; and Orson Welles and the War of the Worlds.