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Sing Me Back Home

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Futterman
The communal aspect of New Orleans music has never been more obvious than in the slew of ensuing projects that arose out of the Katrina disaster. Coming together for this affecting and funky assemblage of Big Easy talent are such stalwarts as Irma Thomas, Ivan and Cyrille Neville, George Porter Jr. and Leo Nocentelli of the Meters, Henry Butler, the Subdudes, and, of course, Dr. John, the very embodiment of New Orleans for many people. Katrina has evoked mixed feelings from the indigenous musical community, as righteous anger over official mismanagement has combined with a deep civic pride over the city?s unique culture. These dual feelings resonate throughout Sing ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Futterman
The communal aspect of New Orleans music has never been more obvious than in the slew of ensuing projects that arose out of the Katrina disaster. Coming together for this affecting and funky assemblage of Big Easy talent are such stalwarts as Irma Thomas, Ivan and Cyrille Neville, George Porter Jr. and Leo Nocentelli of the Meters, Henry Butler, the Subdudes, and, of course, Dr. John, the very embodiment of New Orleans for many people. Katrina has evoked mixed feelings from the indigenous musical community, as righteous anger over official mismanagement has combined with a deep civic pride over the city’s unique culture. These dual feelings resonate throughout Sing Me Back Home. Thus, we find the rousing "Jesus on the Main Line/I'm Walking/The Saints" medley by the Sixth Ward All-Star Brass Band Revue and the Mighty Clouds of Joy’s “99 ½ Won’t Do” juxtaposed with the heartfelt fury of Ivan Neville’s take on the John Fogerty classic “Fortunate Son” and Cyril Neville’s yearning “This Is My Country,” originally recorded by Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions. The feel in general, though, revels in the funk to remind us that good times are here to blow away the bad times. The resilient spirit that exudes from such performances as Dr. John’s “Walking to New Orleans,” Irma Thomas and Marcia Ball’s “Look Up” and Henry Butler’s “Somewhere” is testament to the grit and glory of New Orleans music itself.
All Music Guide - Steve Leggett
Make no mistake, the title of this album, Sing Me Back Home, is about as literal as a title can get. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina many New Orleans residents found themselves scattered all over the country with little or nothing left of their homes to go back to, and this included any number of musicians, some of whom found solace and shelter in the musical community of Austin, TX, where they formed, at least for the purposes of this album, a loose-knit confederation called The New Orleans Social Club. Sing Me Back Home is the Social Club's attempt to do just that, to get back home, at least musically. The tracks run the emotional gamut, from resignation to pride, hope, anger, and defiance, all given continuance by the presence of the Meters' rhythm section bassist George Porter, Jr. and guitarist Leo Nocentelli, with drummer Raymond Weber, and if a certain sense of displacement is the tangible theme here, the music itself does an amazing job of conjuring New Orleans anew, at least for the hour the CD is spinning. Cyril Neville's opening cover of Curtis Mayfield's "This Is My Country" sets the tone, reminding government agencies that entitlement does not vanish with displacement. Henry Butler's piano version of "Somewhere" from West Side Story makes the song even more wistful, and his whispery, halting vocal seems to carry as much unsaid doubt as certainty, giving the song a fragile, heart-stopping appeal. The Subdudes' take on Earl King's "Make a Better World" is both a statement and a challenge. Irma Thomas revisits "Look Up," which she first recorded in 1960 when she was still a teenager, with piano and vocal help from Austin's Marcia Ball. Dr. John's "Walking to New Orleans" takes on a completely literal cast in the wake of the Katrina devastation. One of the most striking tracks on an album that is full of striking tacks is John Boutté's delicate reading of Annie Lennox's "Why," with lines like "oh the little funky town/that's where I live/don't know why/you want to chase me away" echoing with an eerie poignancy over an insistent reggae rhythm. Many of these musicians may never return to New Orleans, for Katrina left a social and economic devastation equal or greater than the physical destruction to the city, but during the sessions for Sing Me Back Home, at least, each of these musicians did go back home. The evidence is here.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/4/2006
  • Label: Sony Mod - Afw Line
  • UPC: 828768058923
  • Catalog Number: 80589
  • Sales rank: 124,760

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The New Orleans Social Club Primary Artist
Dr. John Vocals, Piano (Grand)
Ivan Neville Hammond Organ, Vocals, Background Vocals, Group Member
Charles Neville Tenor Saxophone
Steve Amedee Drums, Background Vocals
Tim Cook Tambourine, Background Vocals
Keith "Bass Drum Shorty" Frazier Bass Drums
Corey Henry Trombone
John Magnie Accordion, Background Vocals
Cyril Neville Vocals
Leo Nocentelli Guitar, Background Vocals, Group Member
George Porter Jr. Bass, Background Vocals, Group Member
Tommy Malone Guitar, Vocals
Jeffrey Hills Tuba
John Boutté Vocals
Jimmy Messa Bass
Big Chief Monk Boudreaux Vocals
Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews Trombone, Trumpet
Technical Credits
Leonard Bernstein Composer
Stephen Sondheim Composer
John Fogerty Composer
Curtis Mayfield Composer
Ivan Neville Arranger, Composer
Charles Neville Arranger
Dave Bartholomew Composer
Annie Lennox Composer
Steve Amedee Arranger
Ray Bardani Producer, Engineer
Tim Cook Arranger
Fats Domino Composer
Keith "Bass Drum Shorty" Frazier Arranger
Corey Henry Arranger
John Magnie Arranger
Ziggy Modeliste Composer
Cyril Neville Arranger
Leo Nocentelli Arranger, Composer
Joseph M. Palmaccio Mastering
George Porter Jr. Arranger, Composer, Musical Director
Leo Sacks Composer, Producer, Liner Notes
Tommy Malone Arranger
Jeffrey Hills Arranger
Robert Guidry Composer
Naomi Neville Composer
Wilson Turbinton Composer
Arthur "Red" Neville Composer
Traditional Composer
Jimmy Messa Arranger
Glenn Hoffman Producer
Mark Birnbaum Camera Operator
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Amazing!

    Anyone who loves New Orleans and its music will find the very soul of the city in this album. Living music legends got together to share one simple wish: to go back home. And they spoke -and sung- on behalf of thousands of displaced citizens. Beautiful, moving, impecable. It brought to my eyes tears of joy, anger and hope, all mixed together. The most beautiful album I heard in years. A must have.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews