The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

by Marc Tyler Nobleman
     
 

The crew of the USS Indianapolis had just delivered top secret cargo intended to end World War II. The ship was already moving into position for its next mission when it was hit by two enemy torpedoes and quickly sank into the Pacific Ocean. Survivors clung to each other, waiting to be rescued. For three days, they floated in ocean waters where they struggled against…  See more details below

Overview

The crew of the USS Indianapolis had just delivered top secret cargo intended to end World War II. The ship was already moving into position for its next mission when it was hit by two enemy torpedoes and quickly sank into the Pacific Ocean. Survivors clung to each other, waiting to be rescued. For three days, they floated in ocean waters where they struggled against thirst, hunger, exhaustion, and sharks.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Della A. Yannuzzi
Author Nobleman has written a forty-page picture book about a ship and a crew that delivered top-secret cargo during World War II and on one of its missions was hit by two enemy torpedoes that sank the large ship. The over-600-foot-long ship was named for the capital of Indiana. President Franklin D. Roosevelt chose the Indianapolis as his ship of state. After delivering its secret cargo in July 1945, there was a brief stop in Guam and then preparation to sail for the Philippine island of Leyte. The Captain did not know how dangerous this mission would be and that Japanese submarines were in the area. On July 30, Japanese torpedoes fired at the Indianapolis. Two hit her right side. Many men jumped, fell, or were pushed into the ocean. Nine hundred men watched as the Indianapolis slipped beneath the water. Many did not have life preservers. Sharks filled the water, but the men tried to hang on until the fourth day when help arrived. A small plane looking for Japanese submarines noticed an oil patch in the water and looking closer saw the men. No one had been actively looking for them because the ship had been reported overdue and not lost. When the rescue ended, only 317 crew members of the Indianapolis survived out of 1,196 men. The sinking of this ship resulted in the largest loss of life from a single incident in the history of the U.S. Navy. Photographs, a glossary, facts, important dates and people, further reading, and internet sites are included.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-These books are appropriate for students who are looking for a place to start a research project. The writing is clear and concise and the vocabulary is age-appropriate. Each title contains excellent contemporary photographs. "Did You Know?" sections and lists of important people related to the events are included. Berlin Airlift describes how Germany became divided after World War II; which countries dropped tons of food, coal, and other necessities while the Soviet blockade was in place; the formation of NATO; and the major players in the end of the blockade. Indianapolis personalizes a sad occurrence in history by following the events leading up to the destruction of the ship through the actions of the captain, Charles Butler McVay. He was eventually exonerated, but not before taking his own life in 1968. Korean War begins by explaining how North and South Korea became divided; the involvement of the United Nations and the United States; conflict between President Harry Truman and General Douglas MacArthur; eventual peace talks; and the division still occurring today. Accessible and straightforward, this book is an excellent one for the intended audience. All three volumes are solid choices.-Deborah J. Jesseman, Minnesota State University, Mankato Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756520311
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
09/01/2006
Series:
We the People: Modern America Series
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
816,573
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
960L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

Marc Tyler Nobleman has written books on everything from ghosts to Groundhog Day, belly flops to the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Superman to summertime activities. Besides writing books, he is also a cartoonist whose work has appeared in more than 100 magazines.
OR****
Marc Tyler Nobleman is the author of more than 50 books for young people. He writes regularly for Nickelodeon Magazine and has written for The History Channel. He is also a cartoonist whose single panels have appeared in more than 100 international publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Good Housekeeping, and Forbes. He lives with his wife and daughter in Connecticut.

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