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Sinners & Saints - The Ultimate Medieval and Renaissance Music Collection
     

Sinners & Saints - The Ultimate Medieval and Renaissance Music Collection

5.0 4
by Philip Pickett
 
Classical labels are amusing: the first time they release something, they make it look as artsy and scholarly as possible, but when they re-package it as a collection or part of a budget series, they try to give it a hip, mass appeal. Sinners & Saints is such a re-packaging, complete with cover art straight out of The Hobbit

Overview

Classical labels are amusing: the first time they release something, they make it look as artsy and scholarly as possible, but when they re-package it as a collection or part of a budget series, they try to give it a hip, mass appeal. Sinners & Saints is such a re-packaging, complete with cover art straight out of The Hobbit and coupons in the liner notes for renaissance fairs and those fake medieval restaurants. Philip Pickett and his musicians are the real thing, however, and this is an exciting collection of music. The liner notes try to make the pieces accessible and relevant, explaining for example that the instrumental dance-piece "Bransles de Villages" has a lineup analogous to a modern country & western band. Yes, and a theme that sounds like "London Bridge Is Falling Down," too. Many tacks feature lively percussion, like "Non e Gran Causa," with its thrilling and familiar tune. The collection isn't confined to upbeat pieces, however. "Katerine Collaudemus," from the 13th-century "Carmina Burana" collection, consists of two sopranos over a drone and sounds like Hildegard von Bingen. Despite the excessive packaging and lack of documentation about sources and musicians, this collection does fulfill its function as a friendly introduction to early music for the non-specialist. For that, it is to be lauded.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/23/1996
Label:
Decca
UPC:
0028944855920
catalogNumber:
448559
Rank:
11033

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Sinners & Saints - The Ultimate Medieval and Renaissance Music Collection 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are really ''into'' medieval and renaissance music, then this CD is an excellent addition to anyone's collection. The music is very authentic to the time period(s), and if you are into historical recreation, and lack a ''live band'', this would fill in very nicely.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don¿t know if this is the ¿ultimate¿ collection of medieval and Renaissance music, but it¿s certainly a darn good one, with more depth and spunk than most I¿ve heard. The wide variety of selections, ranging from martial to spiritual and courtly to folksy, were drawn from four prior releases of Philip Pickett and the New London Consort: ¿The Feast of Fools¿, ¿Dances from Terpsichore¿, ¿Llibre Vermell¿ and ¿The Pilgrimage to Santiago¿. The CD insert suggests that ¿the sinners and saints that exist in everyone¿ will be drawn to this recording. ¿What you¿re listening to is not the domain of museums, but the music of the people, born of faith and the love of song and dance.¿ And indeed, Philip Pickett and the New London Consort bring this music undeniably to life. Their sound is rich, full and quite winning. It is unfortunate that said insert, while containing texts and translations for all the songs, is lacking in information about the performers and instruments, but all in all, there seems to be a full complement of male and female singers, recorders, reeds, bowed and plucked strings, a hurdy-gurdy, drums, tamborine, and even an organ. If you enjoy this CD, you¿ll also like ¿The Little Barley-Corne: Winter Revels from the Renaissance¿ and ¿The Way of the Pilgrim: Medieval Songs of Travel¿ by the Toronto Consort, as well as ¿A la Via!: Street Music from the 13th to the 16th Centuries¿ by Ensemble Anonymous and Strada.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago