Sister to the Wolf

Sister to the Wolf

5.0 1
by Maxine Trottier
     
 

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Quebec, 1703. In this rough town, Indian slaves are routinely mistreated. As C?cile Chesne watches the branding iron burn into young Lesharo's flesh, she knows she must act. Defying convention, the headstrong girl buys the slave's freedom and treats him as an equal. Lesharo is Pawnee -- the People of the Wolf. Sworn to protect C?cile, he accompanies her and her father…  See more details below

Overview

Quebec, 1703. In this rough town, Indian slaves are routinely mistreated. As C?cile Chesne watches the branding iron burn into young Lesharo's flesh, she knows she must act. Defying convention, the headstrong girl buys the slave's freedom and treats him as an equal. Lesharo is Pawnee -- the People of the Wolf. Sworn to protect C?cile, he accompanies her and her father, a coureur de bois, as they leave Quebec for a perilous journey to the new fort at D?troit. Fort society, however, makes C?cile and Lesharo miserable. Torn between two worlds, they can only be free in the wild. But freedom will not come easily. One terrible night, C?cile is forced to make a dreadful choice ?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Several historical people and events are woven into the story, but more memorable are the fictional characters at the forefront, their trials, and their relationships. Trottier, a Canadian writer whose ancestral tree includes branches at Fort Detroit, tells a memorable story without the sentimentality that often results when romance meets historical fiction.

The story draws us in quickly, the narrative unfolds smoothly, and period details are accurate without being intrusive. ... While there’s plenty to hold the interest in good younger readers, the issues raised should engage older, more sophisticated readers as well.

Engrossing historical adventure featuring a memorable feminist heroine.

Children's Literature
Greatly disturbed after she witnesses the branding of a Pawnee slave by his owner, Cecile decides to act. The very next day, she buys the man's freedom. However, the man, Lesharo, has no intention of leaving Cecile's side. She has saved him, and he feels a sense of responsibility to her. When Cecile extends the hand of friendship to Lesharo, he finds the idea of parting from her even more difficult to bear; in the many years since he was kidnapped from his tribe, the Pawnee youth has never known real friendship. Being treated like an equal by the headstrong girl is a powerfully refreshing change for him. What's more, Cecile and her father are undertaking a long, treacherous journey, and Lesharo feels he can be an asset to them on their trip. The trio faces difficult weather, dangerous rattlesnakes, and treacherous terrain as they cross the many miles between Quebec and the frontier settlement of Fort Detroit. But this is only the tip of the iceberg. The dangers they face at the end of their journey—including threats to their friendships, identities, and even their lives—are much worse. Maxine Trottier weaves together fictional elements of the pair's story and realistic details about wilderness travel and frontier settlement in the early 1700s. The accompanying notes address the historical context of the tale. 2004, Kids Can, Ages 9 to 14.
—Heidi Hauser Green
KLIATT
Trottier lives in Canada and her ancestors are linked to this historical fiction that takes place at Fort Detroit in the early 1700s. It's the best kind of historical fiction, bringing today's readers into the world of 300 years ago, at a remote outpost where French trappers and soldiers are living and working among the Native peoples whose land it is. The main character is Cecile, a remarkable young woman who has been with her father in the wilderness as he lives among Indians, trading and trapping. Cecile and her father Robert are in Quebec briefly and uncomfortably when Cecile sees a young Pawnee Indian man being branded as a slave. She manages to purchase Lesharo's freedom and he joins her and her father as they trek through the wilderness to Fort Detroit. It's a strange, extremely close relationship that becomes a problem at Fort Detroit where Lesharo is treated with disdain by most of the French. There are several wives posted there, and their efforts to get Cecile into "civilized" clothing and flirting with French officers are met with Cecile's disgust. When Edmond, an attractive French officer who has been an adopted son of the Mohawks, falls in love with Cecile, it forces all three—Cecile, Lesharo, and Edmond—to make decisions about commitment and cultural divisions. This is a long story, filled with details of the wilderness, of Indian beliefs and customs, and of life in the fort among the French colonists. The clash between the Indian religions and Catholicism is delineated well, with neither side demonized. What is seen as ghastly is the injustice practiced by the French against the Indians, with Cecile and her father isolated because of their acceptance of Indiansas their social equals. The characters are appealing, the action is dramatic, the description of the wilderness is riveting—making this a fine YA novel. KLIATT Codes: JS*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2004, Kids Can Press, 348p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Claire Rosser
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-This engaging piece of historical fiction begins in Quebec in 1703. Witnessing the branding of a Pawnee "indien" slave, Cecile Chesne buys the young man to save him from further abuse and to ensure his freedom. Deeply indebted, Lesharo accompanies the teen and her father, a coureur de bois, on their journey to Detroit. On the road, the travelers are on equal footing and forge a friendship based on mutual respect. However, when they arrive at the fort, it is clear that its residents expect Lesharo to assume a subservient role. A violent confrontation forces Cecile and her father to make a painful decision. In addition to providing a rich historical background and vividly re-creating the sense of wilderness, Trottier has drawn her characters and their relationships in a fully satisfying manner. There is plenty of action and a sweet romance in the mix as well.-Elizabeth Fernandez, Brunswick Middle School, Greenwich, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The pioneer-girl genre assumes a French Canadian flavor in this story of a 15-year-old girl's journey of self-discovery as she travels west through the wilderness of 1703. Cecile Chesne abhors Quebec's stifling walls where Grandmere expects her to behave like a proper French lady. One day she sees a mistreated Pawnee indien slave and defiantly buys and frees him. In gratitude, Lesharo travels with Cecile and her father to fur-trading mecca Fort Detroit. Cecile creates a stir by treating Lesharo as her equal and donning moccasins, loose shirts, and braids instead of high heels, corsets, and coiffed hair. When a handsome soldier courts Cecile, Lesharo is torn between his attachment to her and returning to his own People of the Wolf. As their friendship triggers conflict between white invaders and native indiens, Cecile and Lesharo realize they are much more than brother and sister to the wolf that thematically and literally tracks them. In the fiery climax, Cecile decides between her "brother or his life." Engrossing historical adventure featuring a memorable feminist heroine. (maps, author's note) (Historical fiction. YA)
Booklist
Several historical people and events are woven into the story, but more memorable are the fictional characters at the forefront, their trials, and their relationships. Trottier, a Canadian writer whose ancestral tree includes branches at Fort Detroit, tells a memorable story without the sentimentality that often results when romance meets historical fiction.
Quill & Quire
The story draws us in quickly, the narrative unfolds smoothly, and period details are accurate without being intrusive. ... While there’s plenty to hold the interest in good younger readers, the issues raised should engage older, more sophisticated readers as well.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781553375203
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
04/01/2006
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Maxine Trottier, award-winning author of numerous picture books, novels and non-fiction works, was born in Grosse Point Farms, Michigan, and moved to Canada with her family at the age of ten. Her inspiration as an author has often come from her ancestors ? French habitants and the Miami people. Maxine lives with her husband, William, in Port Stanley, Ontario.

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Sister to the Wolf 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mac3 More than 1 year ago
This book has been one of my faves for a long time