Sister's Choice: Traditions and Change in American Women's Writing

Overview

IN THIS BOOK, ELAINE SHOWALTER EXAMINES WHETHER OR NOT COMMON THREADS CONNECT AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS FROM DIFFERENT ERAS AND BACKGROUNDS IN A COHERENT TRADITION. HOW HAVE THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WOMEN'S RIGHTS, WOMEN'S RITES, AND WOMEN'S WRITINGS BEEN PORTRAYED IN AMERICAN WOMEN'S LITERATURE?
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Hardcover
$108.87
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$120.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (34) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $114.99   
  • Used (32) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

IN THIS BOOK, ELAINE SHOWALTER EXAMINES WHETHER OR NOT COMMON THREADS CONNECT AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS FROM DIFFERENT ERAS AND BACKGROUNDS IN A COHERENT TRADITION. HOW HAVE THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WOMEN'S RIGHTS, WOMEN'S RITES, AND WOMEN'S WRITINGS BEEN PORTRAYED IN AMERICAN WOMEN'S LITERATURE?
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
The title of this collection of essays (some delivered as lectures at Oxford in 1989) refers to a quilting pattern—the image, as Showalter (English/Princeton; Sexual Anarchy, 1990, etc.) explains, that best describes women's literature in America: its communal and ritual nature, its continuity, its diversity, its history as a domestic art that lapsed into disrepute before being resurrected into a high art in the 60's. Showalter's dual preoccupation with the role of women writers and the special identity of American literature appears in the first essay, "Miranda's Story," describing the way various American subcultures have appropriated The Tempest—the role of Miranda, the Dark Lady, Shakespeare's sister—as played by American women, the prototype being Margaret Fuller. In successive chapters on Alcott's Little Women, Chopin's The Awakening, and Wharton's The House of Mirth, Showalter identifies the distinctive voices, values, preoccupations, "hybridity" of American women's writing that makes any question of being Shakespeare's sister irrelevant. And in an astute chapter on what she calls "women's gothic," she further explores the contributions of women writers to the dominant male culture. Even in her chapter on the lost generation of women writers of the 20's—poets such as Amy Lowell, Sara Teasdale, and Elinor Wylie, and Afro-Americans such as Zora Neale Hurston—she finds, in spite of the exclusion, victimization, and repression, a "literary history of female mastery and growth." Persuasive, ranging, perceptive, unpolemical, Showalter here offers a splendid example of humanistic writing, of her own "female mastery and growth," a genuine contribution tocontemporary thinking about women's literature. Her flaw: excessive quoting of scholars who don't write as well as she does, illustrating merely that she has done her homework. (Photographs of quilts.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780198123835
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Series: Clarendon Lectures in Economics Series
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.63 (w) x 8.81 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Meet the Author

About the Author:
Elaine Showalter is Avalon Professor of the Humanities and Professor of English at Princeton University. She is the author of A Literature of Their Own, and the editor of The New Feminist Criticism.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)