Sisters, Schoolgirls, And Sleuths

Sisters, Schoolgirls, And Sleuths

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by Carolyn Carpan
     
 

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Sisters, Schoolgirls, and Sleuths provides a social history of girls' series fiction in America from the mid-19th century through the early 21st century. Carpan examines popular series, sub-genres, themes, and characters found in approximately 100 popular series, noting how such books reflect or subvert the culture of the era in which they were produced.See more details below

Overview

Sisters, Schoolgirls, and Sleuths provides a social history of girls' series fiction in America from the mid-19th century through the early 21st century. Carpan examines popular series, sub-genres, themes, and characters found in approximately 100 popular series, noting how such books reflect or subvert the culture of the era in which they were produced.

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
An interesting, detailed, easy-to-read look at the birth, development, and current state of series books for girls....As a first chronological genre study of girls-series books, Carpan's study complements other books on the subject. Recommended.
Young Adult Library Services
Carpan chronicles the history of this genre in a highly readable narrative. It is also a unique reference source. Students of history, literature, and gender studies will find it informative and enlightening.
The Midwest Book Review
This makes an excellent reference for any library strong in young adult fiction or women's studies.
Choice
An interesting, detailed, easy-to-read look at the birth, development, and current state of series books for girls....As a first chronological genre study of girls-series books, Carpan's study complements other books on the subject. Recommended.
Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)
Carpan chronicles the history of this genre in a highly readable narrative. It is also a unique reference source. Students of history, literature, and gender studies will find it informative and enlightening.
Midwest Book Review
This makes an excellent reference for any library strong in young adult fiction or women's studies.
VOYA - Erin Wyatt
Tracing the history of series books for girls from 1840 to the present, this book is a dry read that may find a small audience with those researching literary or publishing history and would appeal more to library professionals than to teen readers. As each girls' series is presented, a detailed look at the variety of plot lines and characters within the series is presented, as well as an attempt to put the series in context among other series or larger cultural movements of its era. Insight is offered into publishing trends of series for girls, including the frequent use of ghostwriters and the practices of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, a powerhouse in cranking out girls' series—the company developed outlines and hired ghostwriters to create the works. The book, largely structured chronologically, identifies trends and subgenres during certain time periods; however, because the Nancy Drew series went through many iterations and revisions over time, the tale of the series is spread throughout the entire book and is retold as each set of events is added. While this allows chapters to better stand alone, it leads to some redundancy in the work as a whole. A clearer definition of what constitutes a girls' series would be helpful; however, the book could lead to interesting discussions about why series are included or omitted, particularly more contemporary ones. Reviewer: Erin Wyatt
School Library Journal
Many of us know Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden, but this compendium provides the broader background of what came before them and what we see now as series books for girls. In 1867, Elsie Dinsmore was published. In this long-running, moralistic series, Elsie, who lost her mother and was abandoned by her father, defied all odds and grew into a religious and upright citizen. Series really took off in the early 1900s when Edward Stratemeyer hit upon the idea of books written by ghostwriters, which allowed him to churn out story upon story to the delight of his readership. It was under his stewardship that Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Hardy Boys appeared. In many ways, these series did not change much over the years in terms of offering girls specific ideals and mores of society in any given era. It wasn't until they had to contend with realistic YA fiction in the 1960s that girls opting for careers over family began to appear. This well-written and thoroughly researched volume follows the changes that Nancy Drew underwent. This intriguing history is for anyone interested in how we went from innocent Elsie Dinsmore to "Sweet Valley High" and "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants." University libraries will be particularly interested in this title.—Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810857568
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Series:
Scarecrow Studies in Young Adult Literature Series, #30
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
1,044,190
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.70(d)

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