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Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution
     

Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution

3.8 6
by John Paul Stevens
 

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For the first time ever, a retired Supreme Court Justice offers a manifesto on how the Constitution needs to change.

By the time of his retirement in June 2010, John Paul Stevens had become the second longest serving Justice in the history of the Supreme Court. Now he draws upon his more than three decades on the Court, during which he was

Overview

For the first time ever, a retired Supreme Court Justice offers a manifesto on how the Constitution needs to change.

By the time of his retirement in June 2010, John Paul Stevens had become the second longest serving Justice in the history of the Supreme Court. Now he draws upon his more than three decades on the Court, during which he was involved with many of the defining decisions of the modern era, to offer a book like none other. SIX AMENDMENTS is an absolutely unprecedented call to arms, detailing six specific ways in which the Constitution should be amended in order to protect our democracy and the safety and wellbeing of American citizens.

Written with the same precision and elegance that made Stevens's own Court opinions legendary for their clarity as well as logic, SIX AMENDMENTS is a remarkable work, both because of its unprecedented nature and, in an age of partisan ferocity, its inarguable common sense.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
06/30/2014
Stevens (Five Chiefs), the liberal Justice who retired in 2010, aims "to avoid future crises before they occur" with his new book, which proposes a half-dozen changes to the Constitution that would "nullify judge-made rules" endorsed by the Court's powerful conservatives. Two of Stevens's proposed corrections tackle constitutional issues that are largely impenetrable to the layman. One would help state officials enforce federal law when in response to disasters. The other would eliminate sovereign immunity which currently allows states and related agencies and officials to avoid civil or criminal charges. Stevens wants to eliminate gerrymandering, which would prevent any one political party from using geographic jujitsu to gain or maintain political power. He suggests modifying the Citizens' United decision that underscores corporations' right to donate to political candidates. His most provocative arguments address the death penalty and gun control. He dismisses retribution as an anachronism and underlines the problem of "fallibility" of executing innocent people. As for the Second Amendment, he argues that private ownership of guns is permitted only "when serving in the militia." Stevens's deceptively slim volume packs a wallop as it illuminates current controversies in constitutional law. (Apr.)
Library Journal
04/15/2014
Former Supreme Court justice Stevens has written a timely title discussing six changes he believes should be made to the Constitution. These revisions, he says, will decrease government gridlock, end corruption, and lessen gun violence. Each chapter of the book tackles a different subject that is currently of interest to the public and the Court. These topics include the death penalty, gun control, campaign finance reform, and political gerrymandering, which is the drawing of Congressional and other political districts to benefit a particular political party. Stevens writes about each of these issues clearly, adding background and history, and explaining how amendments will bring about the changes he proposes. The author does not ask for any completely new amendments to the Constitution but suggests additions to the text that clarify his view of the framers' intent. While Stevens offers his opinions throughout the work, he is careful to provide legal footing and history for all the viewpoints he expresses. VERDICT This is an intriguing volume with wide appeal—general readers, students, and law students will want to read it.—Becky Kennedy, Atlanta-Fulton P.L.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316373746
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
04/22/2014
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
279,191
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

John Paul Stevens served as a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit from 1970-1975. President Ford nominated him as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and he took his seat December 19, 1975. Justice Stevens retired from the Supreme Court on June 29, 2010. He has written for the New York Review of Books and is the author of Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir.

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Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Bearlyretired More than 1 year ago
This book gave clear information about the 6 amendments that are out of date in our constitution. I think anyone reading this book will have a greater understanding of the way our Constitution works and what no longer works. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Short and persuasive
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
guitaoist3 More than 1 year ago
Wow a rich politician callin to limit our rights? Naw cant be. Hr should really stop using the word AUTOMATIC guns because ZERO fully automatic guns were ever used during a school shooting. Thats a flat out lie, as is his whole theory that less guns in good mens hands means less deaths. Clearly tyranny is at work when mainstream publishers release this one sided garbage