The Six Fundamentals of Success: The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization

Overview

"In The Six Fundamentals of Success, CEO and business consultant Stuart Levine spells out exactly how to practice the constants of business success - whether it's satisfying customers, developing strong relationships, or communicating clearly - through six fundamental principles, gained from decades of experience working with top executives. But it's the way Levine zeroes in on these fundamentals and brings them to life through dozens of rules that makes the books so practical and useful. With no-nonsense lessons like "Face time counts," "Do
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Six Fundamentals of Success: The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization

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Overview

"In The Six Fundamentals of Success, CEO and business consultant Stuart Levine spells out exactly how to practice the constants of business success - whether it's satisfying customers, developing strong relationships, or communicating clearly - through six fundamental principles, gained from decades of experience working with top executives. But it's the way Levine zeroes in on these fundamentals and brings them to life through dozens of rules that makes the books so practical and useful. With no-nonsense lessons like "Face time counts," "Do breakfast," and "Share the good news - and the bad," Levine offers examples of how to behave, respond, and motivate others." "Aimed at businesspeople and entrepreneurs at all levels, whether they work in companies large or small, The Six Fundamentals of Success provides the action-oriented guidance people need in today's challenging climate." This new, revised edition includes material on how to assess your personal and team fundamentals IQ as well as information and worksheets to help you strengthen and inspire your fundamentals skills.

Aimed at business people and entrepreneurs at all levels, whether they work in companies large or small, this audiobook provides the smart, action-oriented guidance people need in today's challenging climate. Unabridged. 1 MP3 CD.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
According to Levine (Stuart Levine & Assocs.; The Leader in You), maintaining success in business is a tough job that requires periodic inspiration. His is one of many management books that professes to provide a road map to such constancy, with 93 distinct suggestions that appear to target aspiring CEOs. Organized into six categories (e.g., "Know How To Deliver Results," "Invest in Relationships"), these tips do not represent new scholarship but serve as good reminders to executives and entrepreneurs. Short and almost pocket-sized, this book omits the case studies and anecdotes common to most management advice guides. Instead, readers will open to actionable suggestions that have proven successful, time and again, with examples for implementing them. This type of book is useful for people on the job, but it is not required in an institutional library unless it has a comprehensive management advice collection.-Stephen Turner, Turner & Assocs., San Francisco Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Soundview Executive Book Summaries
The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization
CEO and business consultant Stuart R. Levine writes, "Getting the job done right is critical to a company, and critical to you as an individual." To help any person who plays a part in an organization get the job done correctly, Levine has compiled the many vital lessons he has learned while working as the CEO of Dale Carnegie & Associates and his own consultancy. Using succinct language and concrete examples from his own experiences as a leader and a consultant, Levine creates a smart guide that can help anyone become more productive and respond to challenges with motivation and action.

Umbrella Principles
The Six Fundamentals of Success holds more than six simple rules that can help people work better and smarter. Levine's six fundamentals are actually umbrella principles that are made up of nearly 100 rules that he has compiled over 30 years in business working with managers and leaders. Levine writes that mastering these performance fundamentals requires discipline and practice, and remembering them in a pinch will require readers to set up daily workouts in which one or two of them are focused on for a month at a time. He explains that regular drilling with these fundamentals will help them to become second nature.

Levine's numerous rules for making a difference in the workplace fall under the following fundamentals:

  1. Make Sure You Add Value. Increasing an organization's worth and its capacity to serve customers is at the heart of being the best we can be at our job. The four ways people can do this are: Help the organization sell more, cut costs, get higher prices, and improve quality for the customer. Levine reminds readers that those in an organization must remember to see every customer as a person, know his or her industry, work with a sense of urgency, and make him- or herself promotable. Knowing more about how your organization makes money and creates value for customers is a starting point to adding value.
  2. Communicate Up and Down, Inside and Out. Levine points out that if you want to get noticed by your boss, become a great communicator. Although technology allows us to send information back and forth with more ease than ever before, he explains that difficult conversations must take place face to face.


  3. Kings and Queens of Chaos
  4. Know How to Deliver Results. One of Levine's tactics for delivering results involves overcoming "the kings and queens of chaos." He notes that in most organizations there are those who resist change by creating chaos. Because these people are afraid of what they don't know, they build resistance with a thousand reasons why something cannot be done, play devil's advocate, and breed unfounded fear that new initiatives will fail - harming the organization along the way. Levine offers six ways they can be handled, including:
    • Give them a voice, but don't let them dominate the conversation.
    • Keep everyone who's affected by the new initiative in the loop so they don't start to believe rumors.
    • Build accountability - extreme naysayers will let things slip on purpose to prove the initiative was flawed and they were right all along. Make sure they're held responsible.
  5. Conduct Yourself and Your Business With Integrity. The Ritz-Carlton and Starbucks exhibit this fundamental by investing heavily in building their brand by delivering a consistent experience to the customer. Levine writes, "Nothing strengthens a brand more effectively than acting consistently and with integrity."


  6. Small Gestures
  7. Invest in Relationships. As in life, Levine points out, strong relationships are the foundation of business. Your contacts bolster your career, so small gestures like checking in with an old boss to say hello or congratulating a co-worker can result in personal and professional advancement.
  8. Gain Perspective. Although this is easier said than done, overcoming stress and taking time to determine what really matters in life can give you balance and make you more valuable to your organization.


Why We Like This Book
Levine's vast experience with people and organizations shines through this compact collection of business wisdom that can have a positive impact on anyone who puts its lessons into practice. Familiar situations, timely examples, and relevant advice pour out of every page, making his principles readily available to apply in any type of organization. Copyright © 2005 Soundview Executive Book Summaries

From the Publisher
"Targeted at people at all levels in any organization, the sage advice directly relates the...concepts to how to behave toward...and motivate others…. Alan Sklar's rich, clear narration further stabilizes this material." —-Library Journal
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385517249
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/21/2006
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,055,685
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 7.79 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Meet the Author


STUART R. LEVINE, former CEO of the Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc, is Chairman and CEO of Stuart Levine & Associates LLC, a consulting and leadership development company.

Alan Sklar is the winner of several AudioFile Earphones Awards and a multiple finalist for the APA's prestigious Audie Award. Named a Best Voice of 2009 by AudioFile magazine, his work has twice earned him a Booklist Editors' Choice Award, a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award, and Audiobook of the Year by ForeWord magazine.

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Read an Excerpt

THE SIX FUNDAMENTALS OF SUCCESS
Stuart R. Levine

FUNDAMENTAL #1

Make Sure You Add Value

Adding value to an organization means you increase its worth and its capacity to serve its customers. A company's worth is linked to its profit potential. So if you help the organization make more profit than it does now, you're adding value. And if you add value, you'll be more valuable to the company. Practicing the rules in this section--whether it's "Act like an owner," "Complete one important thing every day," or "Stop financial hemorrhaging"--will increase your individual worth as an employee, and, in turn, make the company worth more. And there's nothing your boss likes more than increased corporate worth. It's one of the fundamental ways you can advance your career, and increase your own paycheck. (Note: In the not-for-profit world, this translates into financial stability. Even museums strive for a "profit" margin in order to maintain their treasures and acquire new ones.) You can increase your organization's value in four ways: help it sell more, cut costs, get higher prices, or improve quality for the customer. All of this is a balancing act because if you cut costs indiscriminately, you might be cutting quality so much that you lose customers.

You can add value from any level. In fact, often you're uniquely positioned to do this. A server at a major chain restaurant once suggested a change that eliminated a liaison position between the kitchen and waiters and saved the company almost half a million dollars a year system-wide. She was able to do this because she lived on the front lines every day. The people at the corporate office would never have seen it. This kind of input is vital to a company.

The surest way to add value every day is to make sure at least part of your daily work contributes to a strategy. Business strategy is designed to increase an organization's value, so by working on a strategy for at least part of every day you know you're adding value.

To make adding value part of your daily actions and behavior:

*Know how your organization creates value for the customer and how you fit in.

*Understand how your company spends and makes money.

*Focus on the things that are important to adding value.

*Care passionately about customers.

*Continuously improve your skills so you can keep finding new ways to add value.

*Come up with and test new ideas.

See your customer as a person

In order to care about your work, you've got to see how you add value to the customer. Who is the customer and what does she want? What need does your organization meet? What's your customer's life like? For example, if you do billing for a cardiac health center, your customers are usually over fifty years old. They probably have children who care about them and grandchildren who want them around for a long time. Ask your team to think about people in their families who might fit the profile. How would your sister or dad feel coming into the cardiac health center? How does your work make things better or worse for that person? Start from the moment the customer gets your product or service, work backwards, and chart the pieces that come together to deliver it. Where do you fit? Who relies on your team? What happens if you're late? How does it affect other departments? How does it affect your customer?

If you and your team know how your contribution fits in the process, it'll be easier for you to see how your work is important. People give their best to work that's important. So do you.

Know your industry

Know your industry and your company's position in it.

1 ) Read the business section of the newspaper, watch the business media, and stay current with economic trends that impact your industry. Don't ignore global trends. They affect your organization as well.

2) Read your industry's trade publications, even if you have to borrow your boss's copy.

3) In talking with clients and suppliers, listen to what they have to say.

Spend a few minutes each morning reviewing the news to grasp the top-line trends. If you see an article that might interest a colleague, highlight the pertinent information and send it to her. Add a note about how it could be useful (especially if you're sending it to your boss or a client). Bringing someone's attention to what's relevant helps others, and shows people around you that you understand the industry. They'll see you in a different and better way.

As you scour the media or talk to people in your industry, you'll develop a fuller grounding in the deeper implications of actions and events. And as your understanding of your industry grows, your broadened perspective will help you make better decisions faster.

Develop your financial IQ

It's crucial to understand the language of money to add value to an organization. It will help you strengthen your performance and confidence and further your career.

1) Identify a financial point person in your organization who can help you to gather and interpret financial information.

2) Make sure you and everyone on your team can read a balance sheet and understand its implications.

3) Ask your boss for the profit margins1 of all your organization's products and services. Find out how your team might increase or threaten that margin.

4) Start meetings with a financial update, such as reviewing monthly business results. Explain what the numbers mean and how the people in the room can affect the numbers. When wrapping up, connect the meeting's discussion back to financial performance.

5) Coach team members one on one about how their work affects financial performance. Ask, "Do you understand how your work affects our ability to achieve results?"

6) Don't assume everyone understands financial terms. Whenever you use such terms, define them. When someone else uses an unfamiliar term, ask him or her to explain.

7) Never pretend to understand something you don't. Ask for clarification when you need it. It shows people on your team that it's okay to "not know," and that asking for help is a sign of confidence, not ignorance.

Demand strong "numbers literacy" from yourself and your team. Make yourself an integral part of your organization's financial health.

Work with a sense of urgency

There are important things at stake every day--your organization's goals, your department's financial performance, the customer's experience. Work fast, work hard, and do as much as you can do well.

Urgency isn't mania, however--don't crank out work just to cross it off your list. Work hard to produce a high standard of quality. Let your sense of urgency come from a genuine passion for delivering something of value to your customer, your team, or your work. Urgency should be paired with pride in getting it right.

Working this way gives you and the people around you energy. You'll finish the day feeling you've accomplished a lot.

Make yourself promotable

To get promoted, you need to already have developed the skills needed to do the job you are working toward. Voluntarily assume more and more of the responsibility. Learn as much as you can from the people currently working in that position by asking them questions or pitching in to help. Usually, they will be happy to have your interest and assistance. And they can be important allies in helping you make the move when the time is right.

Get your boss's support by helping her achieve her goals. As you pursue your career goals, don't give your boss any reason to think you don't care about doing great work in your current job. You'll need your boss's support to get the job you want and if you're not doing your current job well, there is no way you'll be promoted. So be sure your current work doesn't suffer, and that you make your boss look good. That's your job today.

If possible, train and develop the person who is likely to replace you. If you want to move up, make sure it's clear to decision-makers that you've groomed a replacement. Don't avoid this to make yourself seem indispensable. It doesn't work that way. Training your successor will get you promoted instead.

Create your own performance dashboard

How do you know if you're on track to meet your goals? You need a system to assure that you get there. Think of a car's dashboard. There are gauges and indicators that tell you whether critical functions are working. Do you have enough gas? How hot is the engine? How fast are you traveling? This information "snapshot" is designed to monitor your car's performance and help you make necessary repairs before the car breaks down. Design a dashboard for your job performance as well. Use it to see if you're getting where you want to be this quarter or this year.

Set goals that you'll accomplish within a given time period. Goals should always be timed and measurable--you either meet them or you don't within the time you defined. The only exception is "learning goals," such as presentation skills, which can be more difficult to measure. Discuss your goals with your supervisor. Ask for her agreement that the goals you've set line up with how she'll assess your performance. Include any learning goals you've established to emphasize their importance in your professional development. Here are a few examples.

By the end of this quarter:

Increase productivity by 10%

Decrease project budgets by 15%

Strengthen meeting management, presentation, and coaching skills (learning goals)

Get the information you need to make sure you're making progress toward your target. If you're falling behind, step on the gas or reevaluate the route you're taking.

By measuring your accomplishments you not only work better, you can also better communicate your progress to your boss--the person who assesses your salary and bonuses. Never assume your boss knows what you're getting done. Each quarter, share your dashboard results.

Know what's on your boss's dashboard

Helping your boss achieve his goals is good for your career. It's also your job. When designing your performance dashboard, include at least one goal that specifically supports one of your boss's. Even if your boss doesn't keep a formal dashboard, his performance is being measured. When you schedule time to review your personal dashboard, be sure to ask how your department's performance is measured and what your boss needs to achieve.

Here's an example. At a small retail chain, a new CEO was chosen to turn the company's financial performance around. She worked with the senior leadership team to define a number of initiatives. Her long-term survival depended on being able to assess store-by-store progress. The controller saw her challenge and made it his goal to retool the financial reporting system so the CEO could get the information she needed to make better, faster decisions. This move enabled her to take actions that saved the company $50 million that year.

If you have employees who report to you, tell them your goals so they can help you achieve them.

Create a plan

Create a personal plan every year that shows what you need to get done in the next twelve months. Make sure your plan lines up with your dashboard goals and your boss's expectations for your team. Divide the goals into monthly action milestones. If it involves your team, ask for input in setting those milestones.

At the start of each month, create a mini-operating plan that shows what you will have to do to meet your monthly milestones. Prioritize it. Then schedule it. Next, create a detailed "To Do" list for the upcoming week. Integrate this into your monthly calendar or PDA or personal organizer--whatever works for you. (Always do it in the same place.) By Sunday night, create a detailed list for the next week.

Each evening before you leave work, review your list for the day and cross off what you've done. Reschedule what you weren't able to complete, add in new work that's come up, and review the next day's list, and the week's list.

When you start to feel overwhelmed, review what you've accomplished in the previous four weeks. Planning ahead and tracking your progress day by day, and week by week will help you to get more done and move steadily toward a larger objective.

Do what matters most first

The squeaky wheel gets the grease, as the saying goes. But six e-mails and ten voice mails don't necessarily make a decision or project the most important issue in your inbox. Great managers know how to identify what's truly important and do it first. Take your "To Do" list and rate each item. Keep it simple: use an I for important things and a T for time-sensitive things (use both if an item is important and time-sensitive). Do things that you rated as both important and time-sensitive first. Do things rated important, but not time-sensitive second. Do things that are rated time-sensitive, but not important, after you've done everything else. Delegate everything you can that is not "important" but still needs to be done.

Important things help companies make money in seven ways:

*Getting new customers

*Keeping existing customers

*Delivering great value

*Improving quality

*Reducing costs without compromising value

*Managing risk

*Advancing the business strategy

Time-sensitive things are more pressing. If you don't take action now, you will lose an opportunity or suffer a negative consequence. For example: You have to put in your request for new office supplies by noon every Friday. On Friday at 11:45, the deadline is pressing but it's only important if you're in immediate need of new supplies or equipment.

Good bosses expect you to handle 98 percent of your time management decisions. If it is a high-stakes situation and the priority isn't clear, get your boss's input. Otherwise, use your best judgment.

Prioritizing can help you focus on what matters most. Effective managers not only work hard, but work smart. They do this by making the right choices on where to focus their energy and their time at any given moment.

Complete one important thing every day

How many times do you end the day feeling like you didn't accomplish anything? That feeling you get when you review your "To Do" list and you haven't crossed off anything important on it. You fought fires all day and got nowhere. It's draining.

Do at least one important thing every day. Refuse to leave until it's done. It's okay if it wasn't on your list, as long as it's truly important. If you have the chance to spend time with a major customer or your boss asks your team to support another team that's facing a tough deadline, do it. If it involves your team, send an e-mail thanking them for their hard work. By e-mailing them, you've done something else important--you've given them energy and set them up for success the next day.

You need to motivate yourself before you can motivate a team. Knowing you did something that added value will give you a feeling of accomplishment as you end your workday. Give this to yourself every day.

Excerpted from The Six Fundamentals of Success by Stuart R. Levine Copyright© 2003 by Stuart R. Levine. Excerpted by permission of Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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Table of Contents

Fundamental #1 Make sure you add value 1
Fundamental #2 Communicate up and down, inside and out 55
Fundamental #3 Know how to deliver results 99
Fundamental #4 Conduct yourself and your business with integrity 141
Fundamental #5 Invest in relationships 159
Fundamental #6 Gain perspective 193
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First Chapter

THE SIX FUNDAMENTALS OF SUCCESS
Stuart R. Levine


FUNDAMENTAL #1

Make Sure You Add Value

Adding value to an organization means you increase its worth and its capacity to serve its customers. A company's worth is linked to its profit potential. So if you help the organization make more profit than it does now, you're adding value. And if you add value, you'll be more valuable to the company. Practicing the rules in this section--whether it's "Act like an owner," "Complete one important thing every day," or "Stop financial hemorrhaging"--will increase your individual worth as an employee, and, in turn, make the company worth more. And there's nothing your boss likes more than increased corporate worth. It's one of the fundamental ways you can advance your career, and increase your own paycheck. (Note: In the not-for-profit world, this translates into financial stability. Even museums strive for a "profit" margin in order to maintain their treasures and acquire new ones.) You can increase your organization's value in four ways: help it sell more, cut costs, get higher prices, or improve quality for the customer. All of this is a balancing act because if you cut costs indiscriminately, you might be cutting quality so much that you lose customers.

You can add value from any level. In fact, often you're uniquely positioned to do this. A server at a major chain restaurant once suggested a change that eliminated a liaison position between the kitchen and waiters and saved the company almost half a million dollars a year system-wide. She was able to do this because she lived on the front lines every day. The people at the corporate office would never haveseen it. This kind of input is vital to a company.

The surest way to add value every day is to make sure at least part of your daily work contributes to a strategy. Business strategy is designed to increase an organization's value, so by working on a strategy for at least part of every day you know you're adding value.

To make adding value part of your daily actions and behavior:

*Know how your organization creates value for the customer and how you fit in.

*Understand how your company spends and makes money.

*Focus on the things that are important to adding value.

*Care passionately about customers.

*Continuously improve your skills so you can keep finding new ways to add value.

*Come up with and test new ideas.


See your customer as a person

In order to care about your work, you've got to see how you add value to the customer. Who is the customer and what does she want? What need does your organization meet? What's your customer's life like? For example, if you do billing for a cardiac health center, your customers are usually over fifty years old. They probably have children who care about them and grandchildren who want them around for a long time. Ask your team to think about people in their families who might fit the profile. How would your sister or dad feel coming into the cardiac health center? How does your work make things better or worse for that person? Start from the moment the customer gets your product or service, work backwards, and chart the pieces that come together to deliver it. Where do you fit? Who relies on your team? What happens if you're late? How does it affect other departments? How does it affect your customer?

If you and your team know how your contribution fits in the process, it'll be easier for you to see how your work is important. People give their best to work that's important. So do you.

Know your industry

Know your industry and your company's position in it.

1 ) Read the business section of the newspaper, watch the business media, and stay current with economic trends that impact your industry. Don't ignore global trends. They affect your organization as well.

2) Read your industry's trade publications, even if you have to borrow your boss's copy.

3) In talking with clients and suppliers, listen to what they have to say.

Spend a few minutes each morning reviewing the news to grasp the top-line trends. If you see an article that might interest a colleague, highlight the pertinent information and send it to her. Add a note about how it could be useful (especially if you're sending it to your boss or a client). Bringing someone's attention to what's relevant helps others, and shows people around you that you understand the industry. They'll see you in a different and better way.

As you scour the media or talk to people in your industry, you'll develop a fuller grounding in the deeper implications of actions and events. And as your understanding of your industry grows, your broadened perspective will help you make better decisions faster.


Develop your financial IQ

It's crucial to understand the language of money to add value to an organization. It will help you strengthen your performance and confidence and further your career.

1) Identify a financial point person in your organization who can help you to gather and interpret financial information.

2) Make sure you and everyone on your team can read a balance sheet and understand its implications.

3) Ask your boss for the profit margins1 of all your organization's products and services. Find out how your team might increase or threaten that margin.

4) Start meetings with a financial update, such as reviewing monthly business results. Explain what the numbers mean and how the people in the room can affect the numbers. When wrapping up, connect the meeting's discussion back to financial performance.

5) Coach team members one on one about how their work affects financial performance. Ask, "Do you understand how your work affects our ability to achieve results?"

6) Don't assume everyone understands financial terms. Whenever you use such terms, define them. When someone else uses an unfamiliar term, ask him or her to explain.

7) Never pretend to understand something you don't. Ask for clarification when you need it. It shows people on your team that it's okay to "not know," and that asking for help is a sign of confidence, not ignorance.

Demand strong "numbers literacy" from yourself and your team. Make yourself an integral part of your organization's financial health.

Work with a sense of urgency


There are important things at stake every day--your organization's goals, your department's financial performance, the customer's experience. Work fast, work hard, and do as much as you can do well.

Urgency isn't mania, however--don't crank out work just to cross it off your list. Work hard to produce a high standard of quality. Let your sense of urgency come from a genuine passion for delivering something of value to your customer, your team, or your work. Urgency should be paired with pride in getting it right.

Working this way gives you and the people around you energy. You'll finish the day feeling you've accomplished a lot.


Make yourself promotable

To get promoted, you need to already have developed the skills needed to do the job you are working toward. Voluntarily assume more and more of the responsibility. Learn as much as you can from the people currently working in that position by asking them questions or pitching in to help. Usually, they will be happy to have your interest and assistance. And they can be important allies in helping you make the move when the time is right.

Get your boss's support by helping her achieve her goals. As you pursue your career goals, don't give your boss any reason to think you don't care about doing great work in your current job. You'll need your boss's support to get the job you want and if you're not doing your current job well, there is no way you'll be promoted. So be sure your current work doesn't suffer, and that you make your boss look good. That's your job today.

If possible, train and develop the person who is likely to replace you. If you want to move up, make sure it's clear to decision-makers that you've groomed a replacement. Don't avoid this to make yourself seem indispensable. It doesn't work that way. Training your successor will get you promoted instead.


Create your own performance dashboard

How do you know if you're on track to meet your goals? You need a system to assure that you get there. Think of a car's dashboard. There are gauges and indicators that tell you whether critical functions are working. Do you have enough gas? How hot is the engine? How fast are you traveling? This information "snapshot" is designed to monitor your car's performance and help you make necessary repairs before the car breaks down. Design a dashboard for your job performance as well. Use it to see if you're getting where you want to be this quarter or this year.

Set goals that you'll accomplish within a given time period. Goals should always be timed and measurable--you either meet them or you don't within the time you defined. The only exception is "learning goals," such as presentation skills, which can be more difficult to measure. Discuss your goals with your supervisor. Ask for her agreement that the goals you've set line up with how she'll assess your performance. Include any learning goals you've established to emphasize their importance in your professional development. Here are a few examples.

By the end of this quarter:

Increase productivity by 10%

Decrease project budgets by 15%

Strengthen meeting management, presentation, and coaching skills (learning goals)

Get the information you need to make sure you're making progress toward your target. If you're falling behind, step on the gas or reevaluate the route you're taking.

By measuring your accomplishments you not only work better, you can also better communicate your progress to your boss--the person who assesses your salary and bonuses. Never assume your boss knows what you're getting done. Each quarter, share your dashboard results.


Know what's on your boss's dashboard

Helping your boss achieve his goals is good for your career. It's also your job. When designing your performance dashboard, include at least one goal that specifically supports one of your boss's. Even if your boss doesn't keep a formal dashboard, his performance is being measured. When you schedule time to review your personal dashboard, be sure to ask how your department's performance is measured and what your boss needs to achieve.

Here's an example. At a small retail chain, a new CEO was chosen to turn the company's financial performance around. She worked with the senior leadership team to define a number of initiatives. Her long-term survival depended on being able to assess store-by-store progress. The controller saw her challenge and made it his goal to retool the financial reporting system so the CEO could get the information she needed to make better, faster decisions. This move enabled her to take actions that saved the company $50 million that year.

If you have employees who report to you, tell them your goals so they can help you achieve them.


Create a plan

Create a personal plan every year that shows what you need to get done in the next twelve months. Make sure your plan lines up with your dashboard goals and your boss's expectations for your team. Divide the goals into monthly action milestones. If it involves your team, ask for input in setting those milestones.

At the start of each month, create a mini-operating plan that shows what you will have to do to meet your monthly milestones. Prioritize it. Then schedule it. Next, create a detailed "To Do" list for the upcoming week. Integrate this into your monthly calendar or PDA or personal organizer--whatever works for you. (Always do it in the same place.) By Sunday night, create a detailed list for the next week.

Each evening before you leave work, review your list for the day and cross off what you've done. Reschedule what you weren't able to complete, add in new work that's come up, and review the next day's list, and the week's list.

When you start to feel overwhelmed, review what you've accomplished in the previous four weeks. Planning ahead and tracking your progress day by day, and week by week will help you to get more done and move steadily toward a larger objective.


Do what matters most first

The squeaky wheel gets the grease, as the saying goes. But six e-mails and ten voice mails don't necessarily make a decision or project the most important issue in your inbox. Great managers know how to identify what's truly important and do it first. Take your "To Do" list and rate each item. Keep it simple: use an I for important things and a T for time-sensitive things (use both if an item is important and time-sensitive). Do things that you rated as both important and time-sensitive first. Do things rated important, but not time-sensitive second. Do things that are rated time-sensitive, but not important, after you've done everything else. Delegate everything you can that is not "important" but still needs to be done.

Important things help companies make money in seven ways:

*Getting new customers

*Keeping existing customers

*Delivering great value

*Improving quality

*Reducing costs without compromising value

*Managing risk

*Advancing the business strategy

Time-sensitive things are more pressing. If you don't take action now, you will lose an opportunity or suffer a negative consequence. For example: You have to put in your request for new office supplies by noon every Friday. On Friday at 11:45, the deadline is pressing but it's only important if you're in immediate need of new supplies or equipment.

Good bosses expect you to handle 98 percent of your time management decisions. If it is a high-stakes situation and the priority isn't clear, get your boss's input. Otherwise, use your best judgment.

Prioritizing can help you focus on what matters most. Effective managers not only work hard, but work smart. They do this by making the right choices on where to focus their energy and their time at any given moment.


Complete one important thing every day

How many times do you end the day feeling like you didn't accomplish anything? That feeling you get when you review your "To Do" list and you haven't crossed off anything important on it. You fought fires all day and got nowhere. It's draining.

Do at least one important thing every day. Refuse to leave until it's done. It's okay if it wasn't on your list, as long as it's truly important. If you have the chance to spend time with a major customer or your boss asks your team to support another team that's facing a tough deadline, do it. If it involves your team, send an e-mail thanking them for their hard work. By e-mailing them, you've done something else important--you've given them energy and set them up for success the next day.

You need to motivate yourself before you can motivate a team. Knowing you did something that added value will give you a feeling of accomplishment as you end your workday. Give this to yourself every day.


Excerpted from The Six Fundamentals of Success by Stuart R. Levine Copyright© 2003 by Stuart R. Levine. Excerpted by permission of Doubleday, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Copyright© 2003 by Stuart R. Levine
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2004

    Six Fundamentals of Success: The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization

    I have read this book and could not give it a more enthusiastic endorsement. I am the Chief Information Officer of 5 different companies and use many of the principles in this book on a daily basis. Mr Levine presents his information clearly and eloquently. I highly recommend this book for any and all levels of management.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2004

    Wonderful book to share with co-workers and customers

    I love Levine's Six Fundamentals of Success because it is one of those books you want to read and re-read and leave it on the shelf nearby for quick reference. Rules like Invest in Relationships and Make Sure You Add Value are important to anyone in the organization and this is a good little book to share with customers and co-workers alike! This book is very well-written and without any jargons. Go buy it and share with your friends!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2004

    Six Fundamentals of Success: The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization

    When I read this book I thought about another book, Good to Great by Jim Collins, simply because even though the two books have very different styles, they both point out why some are very successful and the others are just doing ok. The fundamentals in this book may sound simple and easy to understand, to apply all of them consistently is very difficult and if you truly can follow through, your business will be successful and far above the pack.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2004

    Very Basic

    I found little value in this book. The concepts are too basic and insulting to the average reader.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    Get it right and watch your business grow...

    A great guide for everyone from the CEO on down. Explains key business concepts and how to impliment them NOW. This book gives you information in an intelligent way that that can be easily applied to everyday situations. A worthwhile read...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    Six Fundamentals of Success: The Rules for Getting It Right for Yourself and Your Organization

    This is not Levine first book - I read his last book 'The Leader in You' going back almost ten years ago and it was a good book but this book is even better! The Six Fundamentals provides some great advice both for moving up the corporate ladder as well as running your own business. I have bought about 30+ copies to distribute to all my employees and use it in my meetings. Rules like 'Make Yourself Promotable' and 'Develop your Financial IQ' are great advice to all employees. An excellent and easy read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    The Fundamentals are Relevant and Timely

    I found this book to be a fast read filled with all sorts of great insights. This book is a must for for all business professionals and their staff. I'm sure I will continue to read it over and over again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2004

    Stuart Levine's Six Fundamentals of Success

    As a self-employed business owner, I am always looking out for ways to increase my productivity and profitability. I found The Six Fundamentals of Success to be full of pearls that motivate me and help me to improve. It also has great insight into the interpersonal skills necessary to be effective in todays business environment. A great read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2004

    Pithy, focused advise

    A tremendous book. I absolutely loved it. This is a resource that can get an entire organization on the same page. Fast, and furious reading. The type of book to get for management team.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    Everyone needs a good foundation

    Using his years of experience and drawing on the wisdom of people from the entire spectrum of business, Levine provides concise, pithy fundamentals for succeeding in your work life. This book is accessible and specific. While many of the rules might seem to be just common sense it is the clear examples of how to live these rules in everyday situations that makes the book a valuable tool to have.

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