Six Principles for Teaching English Language Learners in All Classrooms / Edition 1

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Overview

With examples, checklists, and more, this instructional model helps educators address language development in a regular classroom while supporting ELLs in learning academic content.

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Editorial Reviews

Robert Rueda
"A highly accessible and practical resource for applying sociocultural theory to both pedagogyand parent involvement. It begins with theory, but then provides excellent examples of how the principles might be meaningfully applied in real classrooms."
Robert Rueda
"A highly accessible and practical resource for applying sociocultural theory to both pedagogyand parent involvement. It begins with theory, but then provides excellent examples of how the principles might be meaningfully applied in real classrooms. "
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781412958349
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 7/17/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 168
  • Sales rank: 635,444
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Ellen Mc Intyre is a literacy professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Louisville, where she teaches courses on lit­eracy research and instruction and studies children’s development in light of instructional contexts. She has published extensively, having coau­thored Reaching Out: A K–8 Resource for Connecting Schools and Families, coedited Classroom Diversity: Connecting School Curricula to Students’ Lives, Balanced Instruction: Strategies and Skills in Whole Language, and Creating Nongraded Primary Programs, and published in such journals as Language Arts, Research in the Teaching of English, Journal of Literacy Research, and American Educational Research Journal. Her most recent project, codirected with Diane Kyle, is “Sheltered Instruction and Family Involvement: An Approach to Raising Achievement of LEP Students,” funded by the US Department of Education. She also codirected with Diane Kyle a research project, “Children’s Academic Development in Nongraded Primary Programs,” funded by the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE) at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Diane W. Kyle is a professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Louisville. She has coauthored Reaching Out: A K–8 Resource for Connecting Schools and Families and Reflective Teaching for Student Empowerment: Elementary Curriculum and Methods, coedited Creating Nongraded Primary Classrooms: Teachers’ Stories and Lessons Learned, and pub­lished in such journals as Language Arts, Peabody Journal of Education, Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, Education & Equity, Teaching Children Mathematics, and Elementary School Journal. Her most recent project, co­directed with Ellen Mc Intyre, is “Sheltered Instruction and Family Involvement: An Approach to Raising Achievement of LEP Students,” funded by the US Department of Education. She also codirected with Ellen Mc Intyre a research project, “Children’s Academic Development in Nongraded Primary Programs,” funded by the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE) at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction English Language Learners of All Kinds Language Learning: How Does It Happen?
BICS and CALP All Teachers as Teachers of English Language Learners A Look Back Is a Look Forward Overview of the Book Cast of Characters A Note for Readers
2. Six Principles for Teaching English Language Learners: The Instructional Model The CREDE Five Pedagogy Standards The Model Enacted in Seventh Grade Reflection on Cori's Teaching Cori and the CREDE Standards Joint Productive Activity Contextualization Language and Literacy Rigorous Curriculum Instructional Conversation This Seems Overwhelming: Can I Do It?
Scaffolding the Five Standards
3. Joint Productive Activity (JPA) and English Language Learners Reflection on Vickie's Lesson Rationale/Definition of JPA Is This JPA? Indicators of Joint Productive Activity Classroom Culture The Juggling Act: Grouping and Scheduling of JPA Example of JPA in Study of Race and Racism Reflection on Justin's Teaching JPA in Middle School ESL: Learning From Our Mistakes Reflection on Jayne's Teaching Assessing JPA in Your Teaching Teaching Tips for JPA
4. Contextualization and English Language Learners: Making Learning Meaningful Reflection of Johanna's Teaching Meaning of Contextualization Are We Connecting? Indicators of Contextualization Examples of Contextualization Contextualization in Middle School Language Arts Contextualization in Kindergarten Contextualization in Fourth-Grade Science and Mathematics Reflection on Examples Assessing Contextualization of Lessons Teaching Tips
5. Language and Literacy for ELLs Rationale/definition of Developing Language and Literacy Indicators of Language and Literacy Teaching The Case for Home Language Development Reading Instruction and ELLs Georgia's Second Grade Mary's Fourth Grade Writing in Middle School Writing Across the Curriculum Tips for Language and Literacy Teachers Assessing Your Language and Literacy Teaching
6. Engaging Students With Rigorous Curriculum: High Expectations for English Language Students Meaning of Rigorous Curriculum Indicators of Rigorous Curriculum Examples of Rigorous Curriculum Rigorous Curriculum Enacted in Kindergarten Rigorous Curriculum Enacted in Middle Grades Language Arts Reflection on Examples Questions to Guide Planning Teaching Tips Assessing Your Rigorous Curriculum
7. Instructional Conversation (IC)
Rationale and Definition of IC How Does IC Differ From Traditional Teaching?
Beyond Discussion: Indicators of Instructional Conversation Assistance Through Good Questioning Think-Pair-Share Strategy Examples of IC Instructional Conversation in Middle School Instructional Conversation With Young Children Tips for Instructional Conversation Assessing Your IC
8. Engaging Families of English Language Learners Importance of Involving Families Successful Ways to Involve Families of English Language Learners Communicating With Families Involving Families in Classrooms Increasing Help at Home Engaging Families in Workshops and Other School Events Visiting in Students' Homes Challenges to Involving Families Tips for Engaging Families Assessing Your Family Involvement
9. Conclusion Beyond a Model Approach Compatible Views Development of CREDE Standards Preparation of Teachers and Teacher Educators Concluding Remarks References Index

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