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The Sixteen Satires
     

The Sixteen Satires

4.5 2
by Juvenal, Steven Robinson (Translator)
 

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The Satires of Juvenal capture the splendor, squalor, and sheer vibrant energy of everyday Roman life better than any other work. A member of the traditional landowning class that was rapidly seeing power slip into the hands of dynamic outsiders, Juvenal offers savage portraits of decadent aristocrats, women interested only in "rough trade" like actors and gladiators,

Overview

The Satires of Juvenal capture the splendor, squalor, and sheer vibrant energy of everyday Roman life better than any other work. A member of the traditional landowning class that was rapidly seeing power slip into the hands of dynamic outsiders, Juvenal offers savage portraits of decadent aristocrats, women interested only in "rough trade" like actors and gladiators, and the pretentious sons of pimps and auctioneers. With an eye to the stern forebears of Rome's past, Juvenal puts into exquisite relief the degradation of his infamous times.

For this third edition, Peter Green's celebrated translation has been substantially revised to bring it still closer to the tone and structure of Juvenal's Latin and to take into account important scholarship of the past quarter-century. The Introduction, Notes, and Bibliography have all been updated and expanded.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780856353246
Publisher:
Carcanet Press, Limited
Publication date:
01/01/1983
Pages:
216

Meet the Author

Less is known about the life of Juvenal (D. Iunius Iuuenalis) than was once believed - a key source, an inscription naming one Iunius Iuuenalis, refers to a later descendant, not the satirist - and such evidence as there is remains sadly inadequate. Much of it comes from Juvenal's own work. We know that the family was from Aquinum in Latium near modern Monte Cassino. One ancient Life offers a plausible birth date of AD 55. Another states that till middle-age Juvenal practised rhetoric, not for professional reasons but as an amusement, which implies a private income. Book I of the Satires was not published till c. 110-12, when the poet was in his fifties, and is clearly the work of an impoverished and embittered man who has come down in the world - a hanger-on of wealthy patrons with a chip on his shoulder - but the precise circumstances of Juvenal's fall from grace are unclear.

The Lives all agree that he was exiled for an indiscreet lampoon of the jobbing of appointments by a Court favourite. But they do not agree as to where he was sent or which emperor was responsible, and Juvenal never refers to the matter. Many doubt whether he was exiled at all. If he was, it was almost certainly by Domitian, c. 93, to Egypt. In any case he must have lost his patrimony. It is reasonable to assume that he was recalled after Domitian's assassination in 96. After Hadrian's accession he seems to have acquired a small farm at Tivoli and a house in Rome. His last and unfinished (or partially lost) collection appeared c. 128-30. He may have died then: at the latest he is unlikely to have survived long after Hadrian's death in 138.

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Sixteen Satires 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am reviewing the Peter Green translation (sadly, B+N, like it's competition, continues to mix and match reviews among editions, so I wanted to be clear). This is an often hilarious and vicious set of poems, full of vivid images, that brings ancient (principate) Rome to life in a way that history or video recreation can't. The same could be said in reverse, of course, but this is a unique taste here. More savage and skeptical than Lucian, Juvenal is uneven (especially with the lacunae) but hits like a lightning flash. Enjoy.