Skateboarding: Book of Tricks

Skateboarding: Book of Tricks

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by Steve Badillo, Doug Werner
     
 

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Serious skaters looking for unusual and innovative tricks will find them in this skateboarding instructional guide. The tricks run the gamut from classic old school to modern with an emphasis on diversification, creativity, and originality. Included are riding basics and tips for controlling fear, visualizing, and focusing. Sequential shots detail every move needed to

Overview

Serious skaters looking for unusual and innovative tricks will find them in this skateboarding instructional guide. The tricks run the gamut from classic old school to modern with an emphasis on diversification, creativity, and originality. Included are riding basics and tips for controlling fear, visualizing, and focusing. Sequential shots detail every move needed to successfully re-create the various skateboarding tricks. The mechanics of the sport are also covered, including types of boards available, and the various wheels, bearings, and skateboarding surfaces.


About the Author:
Steve Badillo is a touring pro skater and operates Skatelab Summercamp in Simi Valley, California. He is the coauthor of Skateboarder's Start-Up: A Beginner's Guide to Skateboarding and Skateboarding: New Levels: Tips and Tricks for Serious Riders. His stunts have appeared in national ad campaigns, in music videos for bands such as Limp Bizkit, and on the MTV show Becoming Pink. He lives in Ventura, California. Doug Werner is the author of 15 books on sports and fitness, including the books in the Start-Up Sports series. He lives in San Diego, California.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Picking up where the authors' Skateboarding: New Levels: Tips and Tricks for Serious Riders (Tracks, 2002) left off, this book offers skaters 34 advanced tricks plus an interview with Badillo. For younger skaters seeking their roots, all the old-school favorites are covered, such as the frontside and backside boneless, judo air, airwalk, frontside 540 bertslide, and many others. There are step-by-step, captioned, black-and-white photographs for each maneuver, though the quality runs the gamut from clear and sharp to grainy and shoddy. However, Badillo never appears to wear any pads or a helmet, despite the safety disclaimer at the beginning of the book. His personal comments, such as "ride away with the song, `Like a Virgin,' on your mind," enhance the text. The resources section offers books, camps, skate parks, periodicals, and Web sites. Overall, this title will complement skateboarding collections, and enthusiasts will keep it in circulation.-Michael Giller, South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities, Greenville Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781884654190
Publisher:
Tracks Publishing
Publication date:
09/28/2003
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
549,864
Product dimensions:
8.48(w) x 5.46(h) x 0.43(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Skateboarding: Book of Tricks


By Steve Badillo, Doug Werner, Ariel Shaw, Mikey Pacheco, Mike Franklin

Tracks Publishing

Copyright © 2003 Doug Werner
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-884654-96-1



CHAPTER 1

Old school

I learned most of these old-school tricks in the mid- to late '80s — back when riding jump ramps, skating ditches and building backyard halfpipes were the thing to do. There were only a few skateparks around so we had to build our own ramps.

My influences back then were the original Bones Brigade Team (Lance Mountain, Steve Caballero and Tony Hawk), Christian Hosoi and Mark Gonzales. Tricks shown here can be traced to these legendary skaters. I'm stoked I was skateboarding when professional skateboarding was so young. I idolized these guys when I was a kid. They made skateboarding fun. The old-school style will always be a part of skateboarding and its roots.

frontside boneless

The boneless was probably one of the first tricks I learned when I was a kid. You can bust out a boneless almost anywhere — ramps, banks, bowls, flat ground, curbs. Approach the bank with medium speed. Bend your knees and reach down with your Indy hand and grab the board. When you get to the top of the bank, plant your front foot and pop the nose up with your tail foot and Indy hand. Pull the board up and out to extend your tail foot for full extension. Then with your plant foot, jump up and start to bring the nose around 180. Bring your plant foot back on the board in the air as you start to land on the bank. Let go of the board and lean forward as you ride down the bank. Make sure your feet are on the bolts for stability. Stoked. Now try a frontside 360 boneless.

backside boneless

This trick is timeless. Old pro vert riders, such as Jeff Phillips, do it the best. Like the frontside boneless, this trick can be done on almost any terrain. Ride up the bank with medium speed. Bend your knees and reach down with your backside grab hand (lead hand behind your front foot). When you grab the board pop the nose up with your tail foot. Air the board up as you start to plant your front foot on the bank. With your front foot planted, extend your tail foot out and around. Full extension will help you land this trick. Now jump up with your planted foot and start to bring the nose of the board around and under your feet. Let go of the board and lean forward as you ride down the bank. Make sure your feet are on the bolts for stability. Cool old school.

frontside 540 bertslide

The Bertslide was named for the influential surfer Larry Bertleman. This slide can be done on flat ground or banks. Ride toward the bank or flat ground with enough speed to help you rotate the board. As you approach the bank lay down your lead hand on the bank while you start to slide your tail foot frontside. Extend your legs out and around as you over-rotate the slide.

When the board comes around 360, put your trailing hand down to help you slide the last 180. Push off the bank with your hands as you bring the nose around 540. Ride away feeling good. Now try a backside 540 slide.

madonna

Madonna did not invent this trick. Do this trick on the biggest ramp you can find. Get as much speed as you possibly can and ride straight up the transition. When you get to the coping, float an air as you grab the nose with your lead hand. Start to float frontside as you take your front foot off the board and kick it out straight down (full extension). Now try to slap your tail to the coping as you bring your front foot back on the board. Once you slap your tail down, lean forward as you drop in and ride away with the song, "Like a Virgin," on your mind.

no comply

You can do this trick anywhere on any terrain at any time — even in your sleep. With medium speed plant your front foot down as you start to snap the tail and bring the board around frontside. Kick your tail foot out and around 180. The board will follow your back leg. Jump off the ground with your front foot and land back on the board. You should be riding fakie at this point. After you land this trick a few times, try to do it 360. Just over-rotate the no comply frontside 360.

nose grab body variel

Not seen that often and that's what makes it a gem. The bigger the ramp the easier it is to pull off. Ride straight up the ramp with full speed. As you pop off the coping reach and grab the nose with your trailing hand (tail hand). In the air you are going to suck up your knees to your chest and do the body variel part. Switch your feet in the air so the start of the trick is a nose grab and ends up as a tail grab. Spread your feet out as you start to land the trick. Let go of the board and ride down the transitions. Do it again. It feels good.

frigit air

One of my favorite tricks. I have been doing this trick since the California Amateur Skateboard League (CASL) used it as a logo for their contests way back in the mid-'80s. This trick can be done on jump ramps, banks and ramps. Approach the lip with full speed and ollie forward as you grab the nose with your lead hand. Then start to kick out your front foot in the frigit position. Lean forward in the air and when you start to come down, bring your foot back to the top of the board. Let go and lean forward as you land it. Cool. Now go join CASL.

judo air

This is the exact opposite of the frigit air. It's called the judo air because you can kick someone in the face if they are not watching. It can be done on jump ramps, banks and ramps. Ride up the transitions with as much speed as possible. Then ollie off the top of the lip and grab the nose with your lead hand. Start to kick out your front foot in the judo position. Stall it in the air as long as possible. Bring your foot back to the top of the board as you lean forward. Let go of the board and land it. Now try a judo frigit air.

airwalk

After learning judos and frigits, the next trick for you is a combination of both. With full speed launch off the ramp. Grab the nose with your lead hand and kick out your front foot in the judo position. At the same time kick out your tail foot in the frigit position. This is the airwalk position. Extend and stall this air as long as possible. Your board should be away from your feet. As you start to come down, pull your feet back to their original position on top of the bolts. Let go of the board and ride away leaning forward. Then try a finger flip airwalk.

backside 180 variel

Whenever you do an air and land fakie, it's a leap of faith. Try to know you are going to land it. Ride up to the coping with mucho speed. When you hit the lip, start rotating backside. Spin the board backside with your feet as you grab with your lead hand. Grab the board in the middle. Keep rotating your shoulders and waist 180 and variel the board under your feet. Spread your feet out over the bolts as you start to land it. When you land, lean fakie and throw your arms in the air. Remember, the faster you go, the higher you go and the more time you have to variel the board around.

layback grind revert

My favorite skater to do this trick was an Alva Boy — Bill Danforth. This trick can be done in bowls, pools and ramps. Ride up the ramp going frontside with medium to fast speed. Start carving frontside and grind into a 5-0 grind. Bend your knees and with your trailing hand reach down and behind for the coping. As you grind frontside grab the coping and push your tail foot out to extend the layback grind. After you can layback no more go to tail and start to revert. To do this push the tail around 180 while you turn your waist and shoulders frontside. Come in fakie and lean that way. Skate away feeling like the "Nomad."

sweeper

There are many variations of this trick, but this is the basic sweeper. This trick is done on banks and ramps. Ride up the ramp with just enough speed to get to the top. When you pop off the coping, grab the nose with your lead hand. As you grab, you should plant your tail foot on the coping. Start swinging frontside as you sweep the board across the deck of the ramp. Lay the tail on the coping to drop back in. As you lay the tail down, jump back on it with your planted tail foot and lean forward. Let go of the board and ride to the other side. Now try it with the crail grab hand.

rocket air

Can you guess who invented this trick? You are right! Christian Hosoi — Mister High Air Hollywood himself. Skate as fast as you can toward your favorite jump ramp. Ollie big as you hit the coping. Grab the nose with both hands and start to drop your front foot down the board to the tail. Straighten out your legs and stall it out. When you start to land, pull your front foot back up the board to the bolts and lean forward. Let go of the board and skate down the street. Now try Christian's 13-foot backside method air on a vert ramp.

caballerial stall

All props go to the legend Steve Caballero for everything he has done for skateboarding and for inventing this trick. He is a true professional skateboarder. Start this trick going fakie with plenty of speed. Wind up your shoulders because you are going to spin 270. As you approach the coping, do a fakie ollie 270. Keep the rotation tight and near the coping. Lock your back truck onto the coping as you are spinning. Then lay down your front truck on the coping. Now you are in the axle stall part. From there bring your nose around into the transition another 90 degrees. Lean forward and ride down the tranny while thinking about Stevie Caballero.

halfcab frontside rocknroll

This is a trick with STYLE. First learn to do normal frontside rocknrolls. Start out riding fakie. When your back truck gets close to the coping, start your halfcab. Bring the nose around 180. Point your front foot forward and twist your shoulders and waist toward the transitions. Look down into the transitions to help swing the board around frontside rocknroll. Stay centered over the board and ride it out. Styley.

backside variel disaster

Tony Hawk invented this trick along with hundreds of others. Find a big ramp — it's easier on bigger ramps. You have to go Mach 5 when you reach the coping. As you hit it, shuvit the board with your feet and grab the board with your lead hand. Go as high as you can and variel the board under your feet. Try to spread your feet out over the bolts. Keep your head and body in the transition to keep you centered. Land disaster and lean for ward back into the tranny. Ride away feeling like Tony Hawk. Now go try his 900.

frontside variel air: tale of a broken board

Variel airs can be done both ways. This is frontside. Learn it. Skate as fast as you can and ollie off the coping. With your lead hand, grab the board in the mute position in the middle of the board.

Start rotating the board frontside, but keep the board under your feet. Spread your feet over the bolts. If you have done it right, you will be holding the board backside. Lean forward as you start to land it. Let go of the board and ride away with another trick in your bag. Try not to break the board.

CHAPTER 2

spine tricks

Spine ramps are one of my favorite terrains to skateboard. There are many different spine tricks that I like to skate, but here are three I think you will enjoy.

Spine ramps help you learn how to transfer from one transition to another. When spines are built farther away from each other, or from transition to bank, they make you want to use airs to transfer.

Nowadays most skateparks have spine ramps or transfers from one ramp to another. When you learn to transfer in and out of transitions, it helps you adapt to the terrain faster. Being able to transfer from ramp to ramp should be a staple in the modern skateboarder's bag of tricks.

frontside smith grind to fakie

I learned this trick in 1989 when I saw a sequence of it in Thrasher. I have been doing it ever since. Ride up the transitions going frontside with a fair amount of speed. Start hitting the angle frontside into the grind. It helps to grind 5-0 first, then point your front foot down into the smith position. As you are grinding smith, start leaning with your waist and head into the fakie position so your smith grind turns into a feeble grind. Grind as long as possible to give you more time to lean into the fakie position. Then start coming back in fakie and ride it out.

fakie pivot grind over spine

John Cardiel does the best fakie pivot grinds. He does them fast, smooth and with style. First you have to start out going fakie with a lot of speed to carry you through the trick. Hit the angle just before you start grinding the coping. Aim your back truck, which is really your front truck in this trick, for the coping. Put your weight down on your back truck as you start grinding.

Lean centered over the spine along the coping for full grind extension. When you start to feel the grind stopping, start leaning with your shoulders and head back on the other side of the ramp. Bring the nose around and lean forward riding straightforward. Throw your arms in the air and tell me you just don't care.

bigspin disaster over spine

After you learn bigspins on flat ground, take them to the spine ramp. This trick is so cool. You should try it on a ramp before you try it on a spine ramp. Ride straight up the tranny with a medium amount of speed. With your back foot, shuvit your board 360 by putting your back foot on the inside part of the tail to get full rotation out of the board. Shuvit the board 360 with your feet while going backside. Try to get above the coping. You must trust yourself with your feet position because you have to catch the board in the air to land disaster on the spine. Turn your body 180, land disaster with your feet spread out over the bolts. Now the easy part, just lean your head and shoulders over the spine into the fakie position. Ride the board fakie. Try this trick again.

CHAPTER 3

New school

New school for me began in 1990 when I was doing kickflips and boardsliding small handrails. Freestyle skateboarding was turning into street skating. Technical footwork was done with normal boards instead of freestyle boards. Kickflips, shuvits and boardsliding were the new generation of tricks kids were doing. In the mid '90s there was a big gap between old-school skaters and new-school skaters. I skated for Alva Skateboards at the time (and still do!) and traveled a lot with old-school legend Tony Alva. But I skated both new-school and old-school tricks and continue to do so today. To be well-rounded in skateboarding means to be adaptable to all terrains. The three other skateboarders in this section are consistent, fundamentally solid and creative in their skateboarding. It's always fun when I get to session with these guys. Thank you, Simon Corral, Brahyan Lopez and Torey Pudwill.

halfcab kickflip

This trick was shot at Silver Strand Beach where I live. SSL. With medium speed ride fakie with your feet in the kickflip position. Bend your knees and snap the tail as you do the 180 kickflip. Kick your front foot out to flip the board. Keep your knees bent and high in the air so the board can flip under your feet. Rotate your head and shoulders 180 with your feet spread out to land on the bolts. Land on the board and don't feed the seagulls or wildcats.

fakie caballerial kickflip

This is the full 360 rotation from the halfcab flip. I finish the trick with an unintentional switch manuel. Start out going fakie with full but controllable speed. You are going to wind up throwing your arms and shoulders 360. First snap that ollie and kick out your front foot to do the 360 kickflip. Rotate your body 360 in the air above your board. Keep your knees bent and above the board. Catch the board with your feet as you start to land fakie. Lean fakie as you land so you don't get thrown off the board. Don't get frustrated with this trick. Just practice and work on the full rotation.

pop shuvit

This is a fundamental flat ground trick that every skater should know. This trick can be done on almost any terrain. Skate at any speed and bend your knees as you snap the ollie. When you ollie, shuvit the tail with your tail foot backside. This means you push the tail around in the air. This should spin the board around 180. Use your front foot to guide the board around. Keep your knees bent and above the board as you catch it with your feet. Land on top of the bolts and skate away. Now try frontside pop shuvit.

backside bigspin

I wanted to show the bigspin on flat ground so you could learn it before you took it to the spine ramp. Basically the bigspin is a 360 shuvit with a 180 body variel. Start by going forward with your back foot on the inside part of the tail and your front foot on the bolts. As you begin to 360 shuvit, push the tail to spin the board around. Get your knees up in the air above your board.

Start rotating your body 180 as you catch the board with your feet over the bolts. Lean fakie and ride it out. Now try it down some stairs.

backside kickflip disaster

Another one of my favorite tricks. It can be done on ramps, banks, pools and curbs. In this sequence I do it as a transfer from corner ramp to quarter pipe on the second level. The Skatelab ramps that hosted this trick are gone now but will always be remembered. This trick is on the cover of the book. You can do it going at about normal speed but for this sequence I was going full speed to boardslide the disaster. As you approach the coping, have your feet in the kickflip position. Pop off the coping and kick your front foot up and out to flip the board. Once again keep your knees bent and over the board while it is rotating under you. Stay centered over the board as you catch it with your feet. Just as you catch the board, start leaning into the transitions as you land disaster. Push your front foot down when you come in the tranny and clear the coping so you don't hang up on it. Lean forward and ride away feeling stoked.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Skateboarding: Book of Tricks by Steve Badillo, Doug Werner, Ariel Shaw, Mikey Pacheco, Mike Franklin. Copyright © 2003 Doug Werner. Excerpted by permission of Tracks Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Skateboarding: Book of Tricks 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
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