A Sketch of the Life and Labors of George Whitefield

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Overview

"A Sketch of the Life and Labors of George Whitefield," by J. C. Ryle, provides a sketch of Whitefield's times, life, religion, preaching, and work. Whitefield was an English Anglican priest who helped spread the Great Awakening in Britain, and especially in the British North American colonies. He became perhaps the best-known preacher in Britain and America in the 18th century, and, because he traveled through all of the American colonies and drew great crowds and media coverage, he was one of the most widely recognized public figures in ...
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A Sketch of the Life and Labors of George Whitefield

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Overview

"A Sketch of the Life and Labors of George Whitefield," by J. C. Ryle, provides a sketch of Whitefield's times, life, religion, preaching, and work. Whitefield was an English Anglican priest who helped spread the Great Awakening in Britain, and especially in the British North American colonies. He became perhaps the best-known preacher in Britain and America in the 18th century, and, because he traveled through all of the American colonies and drew great crowds and media coverage, he was one of the most widely recognized public figures in colonial America. The Anglican Church did not assign him a pulpit, so he began preaching in parks and fields in England on his own, reaching out to people who normally did not attend church. Like Jonathan Edwards, he developed a style of preaching that elicited emotional responses from his audiences. But Whitefield had charisma, and his voice (which according to many accounts, could be heard over vast distances), his small stature, and even his cross-eyed appearance (which some people took as a mark of divine favor) all served to help make him one of the first celebrities in the American colonies. Thanks to widespread dissemination of print media, perhaps half of all colonists eventually heard about, read about, or read something written by Whitefield. He employed print systematically, sending advance men to put up broadsides and distribute handbills announcing his sermons. He also arranged to have his sermons published. He first took to preaching in the open air on Hanham Mount, Kingswood, in southeast Bristol where a crowd of 20,000 people gathered to hear him. Even larger crowds-Whitefield estimated 30,000-met him in Cambuslang in 1742. Benjamin Franklin attended a revival meeting in Philadelphia and was greatly impressed with Whitefield's ability to deliver a message to such a large group. It is estimated that throughout his life, Whitefield preached more than 18,000 formal sermons, of which seventy-eight have been published.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611045529
  • Publisher: Way Mark Books
  • Publication date: 1/2/2012
  • Pages: 80
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.17 (d)

Meet the Author

John Charles Ryle (1816-1900) was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool. Ryle was born at Macclesfield, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he was Craven Scholar in 1836. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). However before taking the latter office, he was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft. His appointment to Liverpool was at the recommendation of the outgoing Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. He was a writer, pastor and an evangelical preacher. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69), Principles for Churchmen (1884). Ryle was an athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before choosing a path of ordained ministry. While hearing Ephesians 2 read in church in 1838, he felt a spiritual awakening and was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. For 38 years he was a parish vicar, first at Helmingham and later at Stradbrooke, in Suffolk. He became a leader of the evangelical party in the Church of England and was noted for his doctrinal essays and polemical writings. In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year. He is buried in the All Saints' Church, Childwall, Liverpool. In his diocese, he formed a clergy pension fund for his diocese and built over forty churches. Controversially, he emphasized raising clergy salaries ahead of building a cathedral for his new diocese. Ryle was described as having a commanding presence and vigorous in advocating his principles albeit with a warm disposition. He was also credited with having success in evangelizing the blue collar community.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Decent book terrible scan full of typos and unreadable words

    Every page has multiple mistakes which often make words unreadable making it hard to read. You often have to guess words sometimes it is possible to guess but many times found i had no idea what the word was supposed to be which is frustrating as like most scanned books on nook nobody has bothered to proof read or spellcheck it. Its full of mistakes in most paragraphs.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted June 19, 2011

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