Skills for Preschool Teachers / Edition 9

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Overview

For over two decades, Skills for Preschool Teachers has prepared teachers, teaching assistants, college students, classroom volunteers, and CDA candidates to work with children three-to-five years of age in preschools, center-based child care, Head Starts, and pre-kindergartens. The skills for working with young children are presented in 13 easily-readable, fact-filled chapters, each of which is based on one of the CDA "functional areas": safe, healthy, learning environment, physical, cognitive, communication, creative, self-concept, social, guidance, family, program management, and professionalism. Its use of practical checklists for observing children and the classroom environment has been a hallmark of this text, as well as its use of the latest children’s picture books as lead-ins to every curriculum area covered. Practitioners will appreciate the appropriate NAEYC Program Standards in every chapter, as well as a section on inclusion and how to help children with disabilities succeed in classroom activities. New topics in this ninth edition include: how to respond to bullying in the classroom and playground; an expanded discussion of brain research and cognitive development; critical information on helping “dual-language learners” who are learning English as well as their own home language; and creating a professional portfolio. Proven in content and clearly written, this sound resource provides the practitioner with solid, practical tips, new research, and empirically-based methods and strategies for working with and teaching young children in an array of educational settings.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130388407
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 1/24/2011
  • Series: Pearson Custom Education Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 9
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 708,745
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Janice J. Beaty, professor emerita, Elmira College, Elmira, New York, is a full-time writer of early childhood college textbooks and a consultant and trainer in early childhood education from her new home in Gulf Breeze, Florida. Some of her textbooks include: Observing Development of the Young Child (6th Ed.), Prosocial Guidance for the Preschool Child, and, most recent, Early Literacy in Preschool and Kindergarten (2nd Ed.) with Dr. Linda Pratt. Dr. Beaty is also involved in an early literacy mentoring program with Foster Grandparents in schools and Head Start centers in central Missouri.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1 Maintaining a Safe Classroom

Chapter 2 Maintaining a Healthy Classroom

Chapter 3 Etablishing a Learning Environment

Chapter 4 Advancing Physical Skills

Chapter 5 Advancing Cognitive Skills

Chapter 6 Advancing Communication Skills

Chapter 7 Advancing Creative Skills

Chapter 8 Building a Positive Self-Concept

Chapter 9 Promoting Social Skills

Chapter 10 Providing Guidance

Chapter 11 Promoting Family Involvement

Chapter 12 Providing Program Management

Chapter 13 Promoting Professionalism

Appendix A Becoming a CDA: Child Development Associate

Appendix B Teacher Skills Checklist for Infant and Toddler Programs

Index

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Preface

This text presents and discusses basic classroom skills for preschool teachers. It is designed for use by college students preparing to be teachers in preschool, center-based child care, Head Start, and prekindergarten. It is also useful for inservice teachers, assistant teachers, and volunteers who are updating their skills or preparing for the national CDA (Child Development Associate) credential.

The skills for working with 3- to 5-year-old children in a classroom setting are presented in 13 chapters. Each chapter is a self-contained learning module with objectives, text, learning activities, end-of-chapter questions, an evaluation sheet, and lists of references, supplementary readings, and videotapes. Some chapters contain lists of children's computer programs, music distributors, and book toy distributors. Students may progress through each chapter at their own pace using the Self-Taught Module Approach. College instructors or trainers can use the text as assigned reading in courses and workshops, or for student teaching. Checklists and forms placed throughout chapters may be photocopied and used again and again.

To gain the greatest value from this program, the student should be in an early childhood classroom setting to apply the ideas with young children. Many college and university programs place students in a nursery school or lab school setting for several mornings a week so that they may accomplish the prescribed learning activities with young children.

College and university programs that use this text as a resource for a practicum or internship often expect students to complete three or four modules in one semester. To determine whichmodule chapters a student should work on, some programs carry out an initial assessment of the students as they work in an early childhood classroom. The instructor uses the Teacher Skills Checklist (see Introduction) as an observation tool in an initial assessment of the students' skills. Students are also asked to complete a self-evaluation using the Teacher Skills Checklist as described in the Introduction. The instructor and each student then have a conference, during which they compare checklist results and determine on which of the thirteen skill areas the student needs to concentrate, thus providing an individualized training program based on student strengths and needs.

Observation tools in the text that focus on the strengths and needs of young children include the Large Motor Checklist, Small Motor Checklist, Creative Movement Checklist, Cognitive Concepts Checklist, Children's Curiosity Checklist, Self-Concept Checklist, Social Skills Checklist, and Child Involvement Checklist. The physical environment and materials of the early childhood classroom are assessed with observation tools such as the Classroom Safety Checklist, Classroom Cleanliness Checklist, Learning Center Checklist, Learning Center Location Checklist, and Book Selection Checklist. In addition to the Teacher Skills Checklist, the text also includes a Teacher Listening and Speaking Checklist.

The 13 chapters of the text are arranged in the same order as the skills in the Teacher Skills Checklist and the 13 CDA functional areas. Each chapter provides theoretical background on the particular skill topic, as well as ideas for practical application in working with young children and their families in an early childhood classroom.

New Features in the Seventh Edition

This seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers has been revised to include new material in each chapter, with special emphasis on creating a calm and happy atmosphere in the classroom conducive to learning. New material describes teacher behavior in emergency situations to dissipate children's fears, support mental and emotional health of children, and help them cope with traumatic events. Brain research on stress is described as the basis for providing a high-activity, low-stress environment.

A new Creative Movement Checklist helps teachers find ways to involve children in this important area, supported by the latest brain research on movement and music. A new Cognitive Concepts Checklist helps teachers focus on the basic concepts necessary for children's learning. A continued discussion of children's natural emergence into reading and writing includes new picture books and computer programs to support the hands-on activities offered. Using picture song books to encourage chanting, acting out verses, and even creating a sandbox theater with cutout characters is described. A discussion of cultural influences on a child's self-concept helps teachers recognize how family values may affect child behavior in the classroom. An expanded discussion of how children learn to make friends gives teachers suggestions for creating a "kindness class," for developing "listening partners," and for helping children with special needs to find friends. A discussion of the child as a spiritual being reinforces these ideas, encouraging children's appropriate behavior and development of self-control. Family classroom meetings are described as an important means of family involvement in the program.

In the chapter on "program management" (Chapter 12) a discussion of managing time contrasts American practices with those of Reggio Emilia programs in Italy. Other new ideas and knowledge in the field of early childhood education are described in the chapter on "promoting professionalism" (Chapter 13) along with the latest information on the National Association for the Education of Young Children's "Code of Ethical Conduct" and the training necessary to make it meaningful to classroom staff. Finally, a new section, Appendix A: Becoming a CDA: Child Development Associate, describes this process in greater detail.

As in previous editions of Skills for Preschool Teachers, this seventh edition features how to use the latest children's picture books, including 40 new ones added to the 200 children's books also described.

Use as a Companion Text

This seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers is designed to be used as a companion volume with the author's text Observing Development of the Young Child (Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2002). While Skills is intended as a teacher development textbook, the companion volume Observing is a child development book that focuses on six major areas of development: emotional, social, motor, cognitive, language, and creative.

Like this text, Observing Development of the Young Child is based on an observational checklist, the Child Skills Checklist, with each major area of the checklist represented by a chapter in the book: self-identity, emotional development, social play, prosocial behavior, large motor development, small motor development, cognitive development, spoken language, prewriting and prereading skills, art skills, and imagination. The observational items on the checklist represent subheadings in each chapter, just as they do in this text.

Observing Development of the Young Child presents ideas and activities to promote child development in each of the child skill areas. Planning for individual children based on checklist results helps student interns as well as teachers to provide developmentally appropriate activities for their children.

Students and instructors are encouraged to obtain a copy of Observing Development of the Young Child to be used in conjunction with this seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

This text presents and discusses basic classroom skills for preschool teachers. It is designed for use by college students preparing to be teachers in preschool, center-based child care, Head Start, and prekindergarten. It is also useful for inservice teachers, assistant teachers, and volunteers who are updating their skills or preparing for the national CDA (Child Development Associate) credential.

The skills for working with 3- to 5-year-old children in a classroom setting are presented in 13 chapters. Each chapter is a self-contained learning module with objectives, text, learning activities, end-of-chapter questions, an evaluation sheet, and lists of references, supplementary readings, and videotapes. Some chapters contain lists of children's computer programs, music distributors, and book toy distributors. Students may progress through each chapter at their own pace using the Self-Taught Module Approach. College instructors or trainers can use the text as assigned reading in courses and workshops, or for student teaching. Checklists and forms placed throughout chapters may be photocopied and used again and again.

To gain the greatest value from this program, the student should be in an early childhood classroom setting to apply the ideas with young children. Many college and university programs place students in a nursery school or lab school setting for several mornings a week so that they may accomplish the prescribed learning activities with young children.

College and university programs that use this text as a resource for a practicum or internship often expect students to complete three or four modules in one semester. To determine which module chapters a studentshould work on, some programs carry out an initial assessment of the students as they work in an early childhood classroom. The instructor uses the Teacher Skills Checklist (see Introduction) as an observation tool in an initial assessment of the students' skills. Students are also asked to complete a self-evaluation using the Teacher Skills Checklist as described in the Introduction. The instructor and each student then have a conference, during which they compare checklist results and determine on which of the thirteen skill areas the student needs to concentrate, thus providing an individualized training program based on student strengths and needs.

Observation tools in the text that focus on the strengths and needs of young children include the Large Motor Checklist, Small Motor Checklist, Creative Movement Checklist, Cognitive Concepts Checklist, Children's Curiosity Checklist, Self-Concept Checklist, Social Skills Checklist, and Child Involvement Checklist. The physical environment and materials of the early childhood classroom are assessed with observation tools such as the Classroom Safety Checklist, Classroom Cleanliness Checklist, Learning Center Checklist, Learning Center Location Checklist, and Book Selection Checklist. In addition to the Teacher Skills Checklist, the text also includes a Teacher Listening and Speaking Checklist.

The 13 chapters of the text are arranged in the same order as the skills in the Teacher Skills Checklist and the 13 CDA functional areas. Each chapter provides theoretical background on the particular skill topic, as well as ideas for practical application in working with young children and their families in an early childhood classroom.

New Features in the Seventh Edition

This seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers has been revised to include new material in each chapter, with special emphasis on creating a calm and happy atmosphere in the classroom conducive to learning. New material describes teacher behavior in emergency situations to dissipate children's fears, support mental and emotional health of children, and help them cope with traumatic events. Brain research on stress is described as the basis for providing a high-activity, low-stress environment.

A new Creative Movement Checklist helps teachers find ways to involve children in this important area, supported by the latest brain research on movement and music. A new Cognitive Concepts Checklist helps teachers focus on the basic concepts necessary for children's learning. A continued discussion of children's natural emergence into reading and writing includes new picture books and computer programs to support the hands-on activities offered. Using picture song books to encourage chanting, acting out verses, and even creating a sandbox theater with cutout characters is described. A discussion of cultural influences on a child's self-concept helps teachers recognize how family values may affect child behavior in the classroom. An expanded discussion of how children learn to make friends gives teachers suggestions for creating a "kindness class," for developing "listening partners," and for helping children with special needs to find friends. A discussion of the child as a spiritual being reinforces these ideas, encouraging children's appropriate behavior and development of self-control. Family classroom meetings are described as an important means of family involvement in the program.

In the chapter on "program management" (Chapter 12) a discussion of managing time contrasts American practices with those of Reggio Emilia programs in Italy. Other new ideas and knowledge in the field of early childhood education are described in the chapter on "promoting professionalism" (Chapter 13) along with the latest information on the National Association for the Education of Young Children's "Code of Ethical Conduct" and the training necessary to make it meaningful to classroom staff. Finally, a new section, Appendix A: Becoming a CDA: Child Development Associate, describes this process in greater detail.

As in previous editions of Skills for Preschool Teachers, this seventh edition features how to use the latest children's picture books, including 40 new ones added to the 200 children's books also described.

Use as a Companion Text

This seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers is designed to be used as a companion volume with the author's text Observing Development of the Young Child (Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2002). While Skills is intended as a teacher development textbook, the companion volume Observing is a child development book that focuses on six major areas of development: emotional, social, motor, cognitive, language, and creative.

Like this text, Observing Development of the Young Child is based on an observational checklist, the Child Skills Checklist, with each major area of the checklist represented by a chapter in the book: self-identity, emotional development, social play, prosocial behavior, large motor development, small motor development, cognitive development, spoken language, prewriting and prereading skills, art skills, and imagination. The observational items on the checklist represent subheadings in each chapter, just as they do in this text.

Observing Development of the Young Child presents ideas and activities to promote child development in each of the child skill areas. Planning for individual children based on checklist results helps student interns as well as teachers to provide developmentally appropriate activities for their children.

Students and instructors are encouraged to obtain a copy of Observing Development of the Young Child to be used in conjunction with this seventh edition of Skills for Preschool Teachers.

Read More Show Less

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