Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors and Managers / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$51.28
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $2.39
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $2.39   
  • New (5) from $24.99   
  • Used (11) from $2.39   

Overview

This is the first practical book on clinical supervision for nurses. It offers ways of understanding the context of clinical supervision in nursing, especially why it has taken so long to be seen as important, and pinpoints organizational and personal pitfalls that can sabotage its effectiveness.

This book provides practical guidance for supervisees, emphasizing self-empowerment and developing the reflective skills necessary to make full use of clinical supervision. It offers clinical supervisors an in-depth look at their one-to-one and group facilitation skills and shows how to develop them and gives guidance to managers on how sponsor and coordinate systems of clinical supervision.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Roselle Partridge, RNC, MSN (Indiana University School of Nursing)
Description: This second book in the series Supervision in Context focuses on the effective use of clinical supervision in practice settings to develop and maintain an emotionally healthy workforce. It begins with an overview of clinical supervision and sources of resistance, then moves to a focus specific skills for effective implementation to be used by supervisees, clinical supervisors, and managers.
Purpose: It introduces clinical supervision and explains its role in developing and maintaining emotionally healthy individuals in the work force. Multiple chapters contain "how to" skills making this a realistic, practical guide for those initiating and maintaining clinical supervision in their setting. Each chapter presents specific aspects of clinical supervision in depth to strengthen understanding and application in interpersonal interactions. This process encourages growth and support for practitioners who are experiencing rapid changes in healthcare since it promotes empowerment rather than control as a route to professional accountability. Nurses today definitely feel a need for empowerment to achieve accountability while maintaining humanness in their work. The authors do achieve their purpose in presenting clinical supervision and its relationships as a way to help nurses reach this objective.
Audience: This book is aimed at nurses, midwives, health visitors and their managers, professional support workers, and educators who have an interest in the practical implementation of clinical supervision. The authors have trained clinical supervisors at many sites and researched and developed courses about this subject. They have also consulted with others using this method. They both have backgrounds in nursing and adult education and are qualified to write on this subject.
Features: The tables are especially useful to pull out pertinent content for succinct principles or comparisons. Figures are helpful to illustrate points. Numerous current as well as benchmark references are used. Content is efficiently presented and enticingly organized. It is helpfully punctuated with tables and figures.
Assessment: This book is written with the British National Health Service as the focus of supporting and training persons in the use of clinical supervision. The authors' definition of clinical supervision requires careful understanding, as it is not the common meaning in the U.S. Once the reader becomes adjusted to the British presentation and the authors' definition of clinical supervision, the quality and usefulness of the content become meaningful. Pertinent issues are presented, discussing how nurses can be supported positively in their practice using clinical supervision to expand autonomy and accountability for quality of care. In the chapter on "Clinical Supervision Relationship: A Working Alliance," emotional openness and support is discussed as a necessary active part of the interface between supervisees and supervisors. Skills focusing on the "how to's" of rights, responsibilities, negotiation, and criticism are presented with illustrations of negative and positive practices. Clinical supervision, as described by this book, is a new process of support for nurses. The authors make a convincing case for consideration of clinical supervision. Discussion occasionally belabors the content, which is much more succinctly presented in figures, but this approach allows the reader to skim or go in-depth when using this book as a practical guide. This book can be a catalyst for new directions of supporting nurses in their practice.
Roselle Partridge
This second book in the series Supervision in Context focuses on the effective use of clinical supervision in practice settings to develop and maintain an emotionally healthy workforce. It begins with an overview of clinical supervision and sources of resistance, then moves to a focus specific skills for effective implementation to be used by supervisees, clinical supervisors, and managers. It introduces clinical supervision and explains its role in developing and maintaining emotionally healthy individuals in the work force. Multiple chapters contain "how to" skills making this a realistic, practical guide for those initiating and maintaining clinical supervision in their setting. Each chapter presents specific aspects of clinical supervision in depth to strengthen understanding and application in interpersonal interactions. This process encourages growth and support for practitioners who are experiencing rapid changes in healthcare since it promotes empowerment rather than control as a route to professional accountability. Nurses today definitely feel a need for empowerment to achieve accountability while maintaining humanness in their work. The authors do achieve their purpose in presenting clinical supervision and its relationships as a way to help nurses reach this objective. This book is aimed at nurses, midwives, health visitors and their managers, professional support workers, and educators who have an interest in the practical implementation of clinical supervision. The authors have trained clinical supervisors at many sites and researched and developed courses about this subject. They have also consulted with others using this method. They both have backgrounds innursing and adult education and are qualified to write on this subject. The tables are especially useful to pull out pertinent content for succinct principles or comparisons. Figures are helpful to illustrate points. Numerous current as well as benchmark references are used. Content is efficiently presented and enticingly organized. It is helpfully punctuated with tables and figures. This book is written with the British National Health Service as the focus of supporting and training persons in the use of clinical supervision. The authors' definition of clinical supervision requires careful understanding, as it is not the common meaning in the U.S. Once the reader becomes adjusted to the British presentation and the authors' definition of clinical supervision, the quality and usefulness of the content become meaningful. Pertinent issues are presented, discussing how nurses can be supported positively in their practice using clinical supervision to expand autonomy and accountability for quality of care. In the chapter on "Clinical Supervision Relationship: A Working Alliance," emotional openness and support is discussed as a necessary active part of the interface between supervisees and supervisors. Skills focusing on the "how to's" of rights, responsibilities, negotiation, and criticism are presented with illustrations of negative and positive practices. Clinical supervision, as described by this book, is a new process of support for nurses. The authors make a convincing case for consideration of clinical supervision. Discussion occasionally belabors the content, which is much more succinctly presented in figures, but this approach allows the reader to skim or go in-depth when using this book as a practical guide. This book can be a catalyst for new directions of supporting nurses in their practice.

3 Stars from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780335196609
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 2/1/1998
  • Series: Supervision in Context Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 258
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Meg Bond is an experienced educator and trainer/facilitator who specializes in the personal, interpersonal and group skills that underpin professional development. She is an experienced facilitator of clinical supervision skills courses for nurses in the United Kingdom, having worked on such projects in six NHS Trusts.

Before setting up GO education (now called Group and One-to-One Education) in 1989, Meg was the director of the Professional Development Programme of the Human Potential Resource Group at the University of Surrey. She also worked as a nurse tutor, and her clinical background included public health nursing in the Australian outback, and health visiting and district nursing in the United Kingdom.

Stevie Holland works predominantly as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and supervisor in private practice. She is also a supervisor for senior clinicians and managers in the health service. She teaches and runs experiential workshops in the NHS with voluntary and parenting organizations and psychotherapy training organisations.

Prior to this, after working as a health visitor, she was Senior Lecturer at the Distance Learning Centre of South Bank University for 6 years. She cofounded GO education with Meg, running workshops for 10 years for trusts and professional bodies all over the United Kingdom. She is now an associate of the new Group and One-to-One Education consultancy.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of figures
List of tables
Series editors' preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction 1
Pt. I The context of clinical supervision in nursing
1 The surface picture: the development and value of clinical supervision 11
2 The hidden picture: resistance to clinical supervision and implications for the clinical supervision relationship 43
Pt. II Specific skills of clinical supervision
3 The clinical supervision relationship: a working alliance 77
4 Reflective skills of the supervisee 101
5 Support and catalytic skills of the clinical supervisor 130
6 Informative and challenging skills of the clinical supervisor 152
7 Skills of group clinical supervision 170
Pt. III Organising clinical supervision systems
8 Setting up clinical supervision 201
References 229
Index 236
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)