Skin Like Milk, Hair of Silk: What Are Similes and Metaphors?

Skin Like Milk, Hair of Silk: What Are Similes and Metaphors?

by Brian P. Cleary
     
 

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Are you as clever as a fox? Or perhaps you're as sharp as any spike? If so, this book will be a piece of cake! Clever rhymes from Brian P. Cleary and humorous illustrations from Brian Gable present similes and metaphors. When it comes to grammar, this team is not as slow as thick molasses. Oh no, they're as bright as polished pennies! Each simile and metaphor is

Overview

Are you as clever as a fox? Or perhaps you're as sharp as any spike? If so, this book will be a piece of cake! Clever rhymes from Brian P. Cleary and humorous illustrations from Brian Gable present similes and metaphors. When it comes to grammar, this team is not as slow as thick molasses. Oh no, they're as bright as polished pennies! Each simile and metaphor is printed in color for easy identification in this gem of a book. Read it aloud and share in the delight of the sense - and nonsense - of words.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Susan Treadway M.Ed
Language Arts classes stress that effective writers and speakers utilize a variety of specific techniques for better communication. For example, who does not remember using "like" or "as" to create marvelous comparisons? Who has not heard "you've got a frog in your throat" or "he/she has a froggy voice" when someone has trouble clearing their throat or is sick? Stories, political speeches, articles, poems, humor, and a vast range of occasions bring to mind expressions such as "smooth as silk" to describe a person's hair, "free as a bird" while on vacation, or that mountain peaks are "all jagged, like my braces." Thus, recognizing and making use of similes are often easier than metaphors since they lack obvious distinctive markers. Forming a mental picture can be tricky without "like" or "as" as a clear guide. When phrases do not immediately make sense, the audience can lose focus. Parents certainly would like good habits to "multiply like rabbits" (a simile) while preferring that "bad habits hop right out the door" permanently (a metaphor). "You are my sunshine" is rendered when lavishing praise for someone dear. If one's "memory is foggy" about a special event or friend, then key details are missing. That is just a way of phrasing that gives a particular mental picture. San Francisco is truly foggy much of the time, but we hope pleasant memories are definite, vivid and certain, not literally blurred or confusing, i.e. in a fog of uncertainty or forgotten. This is one of many books in the series, "Words are CATegorical" that have distinctive samples right in the title. Cleary is a famous wordsmith who brings his lifelong craft to children in light-hearted ways. With delightful,animated illustrations to accompany every line, the author invites laughter even for not-so-positive metaphors such as "an icy glare," "a heated conversation," and "a coarse reply." Familiar similes and metaphors are presented in common groupings so that children will not gloss over meanings and context. Oh yes, there is a lot of nonsense within the English language that tickle our funny bones no matter the age or purpose. Even though youngsters absorb much of our language automatically, it is another matter to generate clever, original phrases. With hilarious examples and simple explanations, on the other hand, make no bones about it. Have no fear. Jump right in. "So write," Cleary encourages; "Get busy as a bee! Your work is sure to blossom with similes and metaphors—no doubt it will be awesome!" Reviewer: Susan Treadway, M.Ed
School Library Journal
Gr 3–5—Cleary provides brief definitions of similes and metaphors, offers roughly 15 examples of each one, and explains how they are used. Large pen-and-ink illustrations feature cartoon cats rendered in bold, vibrant colors. The style is fun and inviting. The text, which appears in an oversize, whimsical font, is spare, ranging from 9 to 15 words per page. Large pictures and uneven placement of the text keeps the tone playful. Students will enjoy the unstructured, fluid layout, which reads more like a picture book than a language primer. Norton Juster's As: A Surfeit of Similes (HarperCollins, 1989) is more comprehensive; it includes nearly 200 examples. Marvin Terban's It Figures!: Fun Figures of Speech (Clarion, 1993) covers similes and metaphors as well as four other figures of speech. Overall, Cleary's book is a pleasing introduction for young writers.—June Shimonishi, Torrance Public Library, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780822591511
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Words Are Categorical Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,331,101
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
560L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

Brian P. Cleary is the author of the Math Is CATegorical® series, the Adventures in Memory™ series, the Sounds Like Reading® series, the Food Is CATegorical™ series, and the best-selling Words Are CATegorical® series, including Stop and Go, Yes and No: What Is an Antonym?, How Much Can a Bare Bear Bear?: What Are Homonyms and Homophones?, and To Root, to Toot, to Parachute: What Is a Verb? He is also the author of Rainbow Soup: Adventures in Poetry, Rhyme and PUNishment: Adventures in Wordplay, Peanut Butter and Jellyfishes: A Very Silly Alphabet Book, The Laugh Stand: Adventures in Humor, and The Punctuation Station. In addition to his work as a children's author, Mr. Cleary has served as a tutor in an adult literacy program. Brian Gable is the illustrator of many of the best-selling Words Are CATegorical® books, as well as the Make Me Laugh joke books and the Math Is CATegorical® series. Mr. Gable lives with his children in Toronto, where he also works as a political cartoonist for the Globe and Mail newspaper.

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