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Skin You Live In
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Skin You Live In

4.8 6
by Michael Tyler, David Lee Csicsko (Illustrator), David Lee Csicsko (Illustrator)
 

With the ease and simplicity of a nursery rhyme, this lively story delivers an important message of social acceptance to young readers. Themes associated with child development and social harmony, such as friendship, acceptance, self-esteem, and diversity are promoted in simple and straightforward prose. Vivid illustrations of children's activities for all

Overview


With the ease and simplicity of a nursery rhyme, this lively story delivers an important message of social acceptance to young readers. Themes associated with child development and social harmony, such as friendship, acceptance, self-esteem, and diversity are promoted in simple and straightforward prose. Vivid illustrations of children's activities for all cultures, such as swimming in the ocean, hugging, catching butterflies, and eating birthday cake are also provided. This delightful picturebook offers a wonderful venue through which parents and teachers can discuss important social concepts with their children.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This debut publication of the Chicago Children's Museum presents a jaunty rhyme that playfully explores the concept of skin to encourage self-esteem and to celebrate the ways in which children are both unique and similar. While Csicsko's cheerful, quirky art, which takes liberties with proportion and perspective, shows children of various skin colors engaged in different activities, the narrative invites readers to look at their skin: "The skin you have fun in; the skin that you run in; the skin that you hop, skip and jump in the sun in." The text then uses food-related metaphors as it pays tribute to skin tones: "Your coffee and cream skin, your warm cocoa dream skin... Your chocolate chip, double dip sundae supreme skin!" By pointing out what skin is not, subsequent verses affably emphasize that skin should not be divisive: "It's not dumb skin or smart skin, or keep us apart skin; or weak skin or strong skin, I'm right and you're wrong skin." Portraying four smiling children, the concluding spread declares, "when we stand side-by-side in our wonderful hues... We all make a beauty, so wonderfully true. We are special and different and just the same, too!" Though occasionally verging on saccharine, this spry poem delivers its message with appealing energy and confidence; slightly older readers may enjoy Julius Lester's recent Let's Talk About Race, illus. by Karen Barbour. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-This picture book takes a cheerful look at human diversity by focusing on skin. Rhyming verses describe the many experiences that can be had in it ("The skin you have fun in;/the skin that you run in;/the skin that you hop,/skip and jump in the sun in-"); the different shades in which it comes ("Your butterscotch gold skin,/your lemon tart bold skin;/your mountain high apple pie,/cookie dough rolled skin!"); and the things that it is not ("It's not tall skin/or short skin,/or best in the sport skin"). The poem ends by emphasizing the importance of the "`You' who's within" and pointing out that skin is something that makes individuals different and similar at the same time. Tyler's cadenced language makes this a very rhythmic read-aloud. Csicsko's vibrant and energetic illustrations are a perfect complement to the text and feature stylized children with elliptical faces and flowing fingers. Differences in the appearances of the youngsters go beyond skin color and include hairstyles, freckles, and eye shape. While somewhat lengthy-the metaphors seem to go on and on-this volume is an affirming addition to the collection of books dealing with self-esteem and multiculturalism.-Kathleen Meulen, Blakely Elementary School, Bainbridge Island, WA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An earnest but energetic tribute to diversity, done up with postmodern arrays of smiling, stylized, lozenge-headed children paired to a rollicking celebration of: "Your coffee and cream skin, / your warm cocoa dream skin . . . / Your chocolate chip, double dip sundae supreme skin! / Your marshmallow treat skin, / your spun sugar sweet skin . . . / your cherry topped, candy dropped, frosting complete skin." Tyler also urges readers to think about the commonality of "The skin that you laugh in; / the skin that you cry in; / the skin that you look to / the sky and ask, 'Why?' in." Though he changes his tone and plies a verbal mallet to drive his point home in the last several verses, the earlier wordplay more than compensates-while glimpses of one child in a wheelchair, and another held by a biracial couple, expand the general theme to encompass more than skin color alone. A sonically playful, if just a bit overlong, alternative to Sheila Hamanaka's All the Colors of the Earth (1994). (Picture book. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780975958001
Publisher:
Chicago Children's Museum
Publication date:
04/28/2005
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
74,854
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Michael Tyler is a freelance writer and fitness consultant. David Lee Csicsko is the illustrator of Behind the Lions and has created posters for the Leipzig Book Fair. They both live in Chicago.

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Skin You Live In 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
MomsChoiceAwards More than 1 year ago
The Skin You Live In is a recipient of the prestigious Mom's Choice Award. The Mom&rsquo;s Choice Awards honors excellence in family-friendly media, products and services. An esteemed panel of judges includes education, media and other experts as well as parents, children, librarians, performing artists, producers, medical and business professionals, authors, scientists and others. A sampling of the panel members includes: Dr. Twila C. Liggett, ten-time Emmy-winner, professor and founder of PBS&rsquo;s Reading Rainbow; Julie Aigner-Clark, Creator of Baby Einstein and The Safe Side Project; Jodee Blanco, New York Times best-selling Author and; LeAnn Thieman, motivational speaker and coauthor of seven Chicken Soup For The Soul books. Parents and educators look for the Mom&rsquo;s Choice Awards seal in selecting quality materials and products for children and families.
ShortyBrown More than 1 year ago
As a parent reading books repetitively, this book is a relief to read because of it's fun, rhythmic prose! It dips into the cliche at times but has a great message that we are all different and the same and we should love ourselves for who we are. The big, colorful pages are vibrant and easy to absorb. My just-2 y.o. enjoys it even though it is mostly over her head, the rhyming and easy-to-act out descriptions entertain her thoroughly. I highly recommend this book for any age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an inspiration for children and parents everywhere around the world. Everyone looks different in their skin. But this teaches everyone to accept and believe in themselves through clever rhyme and wonderful pictures. 'The Skin You Live In' should be in every library, and every home.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book with a message that is not only important but beautifully delivered. I am insisting that my 5 year old's class use this book as discussion material.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This rhythmic poem with pictures of children, encourages each of us to look in the mirror and celebrate who we are and the joy of friendship. This is a collection of simply presented thoughts about self-esteem, acceptance, and diversity.Our Preschooler loves the the rhymes and talks to the children staring at her from the page. We've had nightly requests for this book for more than a week now. What a great book! The message is visible in simple phrases with comparative language that young readers can comprehend. It offers kids a positive, new way to look at the world. Parents will enjoy the book as much for its fun as for its message. The illustrations are bright and engaging; and the poem is just what you want to introduce acceptance and the beauty of diversity ... without being onerous or dour.