Skinny: A Novel

Skinny: A Novel

4.2 29
by Laura Smith
     
 

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Teenager Melissa Rollins has got the eye of the cute new guy in school. The one thing Melissa doesn’t have is a perfect body. Strict dieting and throwing up can’t be all bad, can they? Tyndale House Publishers

Overview

Teenager Melissa Rollins has got the eye of the cute new guy in school. The one thing Melissa doesn’t have is a perfect body. Strict dieting and throwing up can’t be all bad, can they? Tyndale House Publishers

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781600063565
Publisher:
Tyndale House Publishers
Publication date:
09/30/2008
Series:
The Navigators Reference Library
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author


Laura L. Smith has witnessed the overwhelming struggle and obsession of eating disorders. Skinny is inspired by the stories of three friends with that struggle. Laura is the author of the children’s book Cantaloupe Trees and more than a dozen inspirational short stories. She graduated from Miami University and lives in Oxford, Ohio, with her husband and four children.

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Skinny 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
Deborah_K More than 1 year ago
It's frustrating to read about girls who have eating disorders. You want to tell them, you don't need to lose weight, you're fine just the way you are. It pains you to see someone hurt themselves. However as uncomfortable as this topic can be, it's a serious issue that needs to be brought into the open. This book perfectly captures the life of a teenage girl with an eating disorder. Melissa is your average teenage girl who just wants to fit in during her high school years. I liked how the author made her likable and modern without being too trendy. The dialogue between the teens was realistic and perfectly captured what life is like for the average teen girl (complete with those mean girls!!). However as the story progresses, the reader soon learns that Melissa is facing a battle with herself and her body. What I thought was most interesting about Melissa's situation is that she doesn't try to lose weight because of a boy. While she does have a relationship with a guy throughout the book, he's not really a factor in her decisions to not eat. Her real reasons were more with trying to maintain control in her life, and this was the only way that she could. Side effects of eating disorders are shown to be very painful and unpleasant so hopefully girls who read this book will get the impression that extreme dieting is not the way to go. My only qualm with the book is that I felt Melissa's recovery happened much too quickly. She goes from barely eating anything to being able to choke down a whole piece of pizza. First off, why in the world her parents would buy a fully loaded pizza and expect her to eat this, after she's been diagnosed with an eating disorder is beyond me. From reading other accounts of recovering anorexics and bulimics, it would have taken her a long time to adjust to eating food again and keeping everything down. I don't have a problem with her getting well and having treatment, I just felt that it seemed a little rushed and not that realistic. However the book is a really great read. I, myself, couldn't put it down. The writing is engaging, entertaining, and realistic. It may be a short read but it packs quite a punch. Any teen girl who's even thought about considering that not eating would be a good idea, needs to read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so sad! But it is so good,Im young and a female and can relate to alot of the situations that melissa faced.
Thilfan More than 1 year ago
Skinny by Laura L. Smith is a sweet look at the issue of teen eating disorders. The story establishes all the predicable (and real) pressures of teen life: extra-curricular activities, homework, friendships, dating relationships, and body image amidst it all. While the main character, Melissa, is a saccharine and dramatic lead, she is a useful tool to help the author explore how otherwise stable and independent teens slip into damaging eating habits. The Christian imprint on Melissa's life seems fairly accurate-she relies on prayer and reading her Bible, but is still figuring out what her faith means and how it applies to real-life issues like body image. Though the conflict of moral pressure seems fairly absent from the book since all of Melissa's friends, family, and even alluring southern boyfriend are also churchgoers, the setting feels genuine. Smith deals thoughtfully with the pressures of Melissa's life, and smartly creates a disorder that is not as extreme or obvious as bulimia or anorexia. For young women who struggle with eating and body image, or whose friends do, this story will give them hope, and perhaps help them identify unhealthy habits. Skinny works for what it is-a simple, imperfect, but lovable approach to a sensitive issue.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As someone suffering from an eating disorder, this book was a waste of money and time, and a disgrace to the eating disorder name. No one could get over an eating disorder in five minutes no matter how religious. Boring characters, lame plot, misinformed facts. Do not waste your money
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a parent are you always watching your kids or making sure they are eating? This reminded us to take time as a family and slow down a minute.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The main character if this book has a great life, but for some reason she starts to think that she is too fat. Even though she's medium-skinny. She starts to watching her weight the wrong way by eating little and overexaggerating everything. She develops an eating disorder and her life starts to spiral out of control. Luckliy she is disclvered and saved byher parents before she kills herself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow is the word that describes this ebook.its about a teenager losing weight on purpose so she could fit in.it got to the point that she purposely threw up to make herself skinnier.she was under so much stress.to hear about stuff like this made me want to cry.in the end she went to the doctor came to an un derstanding with God and ate properly.she got her life back on track not a minute too late.i reccomend this book for girls ages11 and up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm a teen girl interested in eating disorder fiction, but this one was not very captivating. Although the story of recovery was inspirational and cheery, read Wintergirls instead.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was good but two things did not make sense to me. #1: Melissa goes frome eating nothing and throwing up every last bite to eating tons of unhealthful food. I know some people who are in the process of recovering from anorexia and bulimia, and it takes a while, possibly a few years, to recover. I think that the author should have done some research and had Melissa take a little while longer to recover. And the second thing that did not make sense: #2: Melissa and her friends listen to 1980's music. I know some fourteen year olds do, but it's very unlikely. Melissa and her friends listen to Bruce Sting, the Beatles, etc. Most fourteen year olds are into pop or rap/hip-hop. Other than those two things that I didn't understand, the book was great. Although, it started out slow, it was a quick 129 page book. I read it in a day. I believe that it is worth gettimg. It's one of those heart-wrenching, bittersweet books. It shows some elements that teens do have. For example, Melissa wants.to be the captain of her dance team and her boyfriend, Beau, breaks up with her because of his parents who think that he needs to focus on school and football, not a girlfriend. Overall, it was a great book, but I would only recommend it for ages twelve and up. (12+) Definately get this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The best book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A very poorly written novel, non realistic characters, poor usage of literary elements, not pleased. (Also, not a good read for non-religious people)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this was well-worth reading. Also, weaving Bible answers and healing thoughout was wonderful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It was so deep and the problems she had were relatable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sad but it is what really happens to people who have obsessive eating disorders.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've already read the OTHER Skinny by Ibi kaslik if you have read the other one I was wondering are they about the same as in writhing not the subject? Am i going to feel like Im reading the book over? Is it worth the money?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This accually is a good bok and its deep. Coming from a thirteen yr old
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pinguinlvr More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. It was a fast read and very entertaining. It brought me back to my high school years and the trials that a teenage girl goes through - getting good grades, participating in extracurricular activities, having your friends like you, having the cute boy date you - all important things in a teenage girl's life. And not everything can be controlled. This is a good book for all teenage girls to read with an important message. The main character - Melissa - is a very likeable girl that most teens will be able to relate to. When things start spiraling out of control, Melissa finds the one thing she can still control - her eating. But that turns out to be detrimental to her life and it impacts her dancing. She finally comes to terms (sort of) with her eating. I was disappointed in the ending. If you are looking for something that will help a girl that is already anorexic, this is not the book. She is not truly over her issues with food in the end. She has basically identified there is a need to be careful and for her parents to watch but it is a battle she will have to control even after the book ended. This book is good for the upcoming teenager to understand the heartache and trials you will start to endure when entering high school and how NOT to handle the pressure.
MichelleSutton More than 1 year ago
read Skinny from start to finish while on the plane to New York. It's an easy read and geared toward young teens, which the "voice" definitely fits. It's a bit young for me, but I can see young teens loving it. The stress young teens face is very well reflected in the theme and emotion of the story. I had a cousin and several friends with eating disorders and the author portrays a realistic scenario with this story. However, the character in the book actually recovered fairly quickly and usually that is not the case. But God can do amazing things when people are willing. I was surprised that main characters had such a warped perspective regarding food, dieting, and the Bible, but then again it made sense that she would see things through that twisted lens. Sometimes young people learn bad behavior from reading these types of books, but I don't see this book as promoting unhealthy eating, but doing just the opposite. I applaud the author for communicating that well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love wintergirls that book is awesome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pants
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am eleven also and you should see what i read i think this would fine to read