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Sky Dog: Lessons From Katrina

Overview

The basic idea in "Sky Dog" is that sometimes the way that we the people, perceive things that are presented to us by the media, that we can only base our conclusion on what is being presented, along with our past understandings of the particular subject in question. When The American Indians saw a horse for the first time, they assumed, based on their past experiences, that when the Spaniards came to America, that they were actually riding on "large Dogs" They even had to look up to the sky to see these supposed...
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Sky Dog: Lessons From Katrina

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Overview

The basic idea in "Sky Dog" is that sometimes the way that we the people, perceive things that are presented to us by the media, that we can only base our conclusion on what is being presented, along with our past understandings of the particular subject in question. When The American Indians saw a horse for the first time, they assumed, based on their past experiences, that when the Spaniards came to America, that they were actually riding on "large Dogs" They even had to look up to the sky to see these supposed dogs; thus the name "Sky Dog" When Bush said that he would give billions to the cities that were devastated by Katrina, I was overjoyed. It wasn’t until I heard our mayor state that we (New Orleans) was still broke, that I realized that, just as the American Indians had miss- perceived what they were looking at, the American public still believes that he actually gave the money to these states. What he did was; he gave it to FEMA. In other words, he gave it to himself. Once again This "Sky Dog" of miss-perception has reared its head.

10 % of royalties from the book "Sky Dog: Lessons from Katrina" will be donated to "The Salvation Army for Katrina victims

From the author Jeremiah Hensley:
Sky Dog is a way of perceiving, things without having true knowledge of the thing that is being perceived. You will laugh, and you will cry when reading Sky Dog. The most important thing, however; is that you will be informed, and shocked at the reality of what had occurred after the sky had cleared.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780977433612
  • Publisher: Parallel View Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/6/2005
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 172
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeremiah Hensley is a native of New Orleans who escaped from the storm, and documented what the media was presenting to the public, versus the reality of what was really occurring on the ground. He presents some controversial realities about how the government and some non-profit organizations really responded after the sky had cleared.
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Read an Excerpt

Indeed hurricane Katrina was a mean dog on land and in the sky. The term sky dog, however, as it relates to Hurricane Katrina, is symbolic of the lessons that were learned as a result of the experience. The term sky dog was and is a physical animal. It is the way that this animal was perceived that lies at the heart and soul of this book. I was first introduced to the concept of sky dog, by a lady named Anna. Anna was a Katrina victim that was displaced from Saint Bernard Parish; a Parish that sits on the outskirts of New Orleans. Anna was part American Indian, and a host of other parts. She told me that when the Spaniards invaded America, they also brought horses with them. The American Indian, before the invasion, had never seen a horse before, but they did have dogs. When they first looked at the horses that the Spaniards were riding, they had to look up to see the horses. By looking up, they also saw the sky; thus the term sky dog. When trying to understand what occurred in the aftermath of Katrina, the key is to understand that, just as the American Indians misperceived what they were looking at while viewing a horse, what the American public saw in the aftermath of Katrina was also a misperception of what was actually transpiring. Just as the American Indians were unable to perceive that a horse was not a dog, what was being perceived as aid to the victims of hurricane Katrina, was only a mirage, or smoke-screen. A lot of truths did evolve in the aftermath of Katrina. One obvious truth is that our country is not very well prepared and organized in the event of a major disaster. Another truth is that there seems to be a sense that the cities of the Gulf Coast region of the United States are viewed as expendable as far as their right to exist is concerned. One government official went as far as to suggest that we write off New Orleans. I know how absurd this may sound, especially since we decided to stay the course in the rebuilding of Iraq. Sky dog is a way of perceiving things, without having true knowledge of the thing that is being perceived. Socrates has been arguing that unless philosophers become rulers or rulers become philosophers, that there will never be a truly Good state. Glucon, who is one of his disciples, ask who are the true philosophers (From the Republic) Socrates: "And this is the distinction which I draw between the sight, loving, art loving, practical class, and those of whom I am speaking, and who are worthy of the name of philosophers." Glucon: "How do you distinguish them?" Socrates: "The lovers of sound and sights are, as I conceive, fond of tones and colors and forms and all the artificial products that are made out of them, but their mind is incapable of seeing or loving absolute beauty." Glucon: "True." Socrates: "Few are they who are able to attain to the sight of this, and the man who believes in beautiful things, but does not believe in absolute beauty, nor is able to follow if one lead him to an understanding of it-do you think that his life is real or a dream? Is it not a dream? For whether a man be asleep or awake, is it not dream-like to mistaken the image for the real thing?" Glucon: "I should certainly say that such an one was dreaming." Hurricane Katrina was like a nightmare, which upon waking you discover, that it really wasn’t a dream.
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