Sky Juice and Flying Fish: Tastes Of A Continent

Sky Juice and Flying Fish: Tastes Of A Continent

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by Jessica B. Harris
     
 

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Savor the food, flavor, rhythm, and romance of the Caribbean.
A truly authentic guide to down-home traditional Caribbean cooking, the kind you'd find at roadside stands, Sky Juice and Flying Fish captures the feel of the Islands, bringing the blue-green sea, the tropical breeze, and the exotic scents of the Caribbean into the American kitchen.

Overview

Savor the food, flavor, rhythm, and romance of the Caribbean.
A truly authentic guide to down-home traditional Caribbean cooking, the kind you'd find at roadside stands, Sky Juice and Flying Fish captures the feel of the Islands, bringing the blue-green sea, the tropical breeze, and the exotic scents of the Caribbean into the American kitchen.
A culinary history of each of the Islands provides the perfect introduction to the 150 mouth-watering recipes for appetizers and soups, entrees, side dishes, and desserts, all featuring the distinctly exotic seasonings — ginger, garlic, chili, coconut, curries, and rum — of the Caribbean.
Begin your meal with plantain chips and a rum-spiked 'ti-punch. Go on to Bajan Fried Chicken from Barbados, complemented by a banana-ginger chutney and served with Jamaican Rice and Peas. Finish up with a sumptuous coconut pudding.
A glossary lists ingredients from achiote (small reddish berries) to z'yeux noirs (black-eyed peas), which can be found in grocery stores, Caribbean markets, or through the mail-order source list provided in the appendix.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Harris ( Hot Stuff: A Cookbook in Praise of the Piquant ) offers an enthusiastic and enticing introduction to the lively array of cuisines found in the Caribbean islands. Combining research with observations from her own experiences, she explores the ``culinary quirks'' of different islands (turtle steak can be sampled in the Cayman Islands, and while peas and rice are ``laughingly referred to as the Jamaican coat of arms,'' curried goat is a local specialty) and supplies a useful glossary of ingredients and utensils. Dishes range from appetizers to desserts, and one can taste bacalaitos (codfish fritters) from Puerto Rico, fricasseed chicken from Saint Kitts or breadfruit stuffed with onion and tomato from Jamaica. Most of the recipes are simple enough to encourage readers to try unfamiliar dishes, although several contain at least one unusual, specialty-store ingredient, such as the Scotch bonnet-type chile in soupe aux pois rouges (kidney bean soup). Harris suggests substitutions for some uncommon items, such as Cascadura (a mudfish found near Trinidad); cooks who can't locate the fish can substitute shrimp to make a flavorful curry. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Harris is the author of Iron Pots and Wooden Spoons ( LJ 5/15/89), a collection of African-inspired New World dishes, and Hot Stuff: A Cookbook in Praise of the Piquant ( LJ 8/85); now she turns to the traditional dishes of the Caribbean islands. Her lively text is well written and informative, and she provides historical background and an excellent glossary as well as an assortment of recipes both simple and sophisticated. Once again, she includes many unusual dishes not found in other books on the topic, such as Dunstan Harris's Island Cooking ( LJ 12/1/88) and John DeMers's Caribbean Cooking ( LJ 3/ 15/89). Highly recommended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671681654
Publisher:
Touchstone
Publication date:
02/15/1991
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
835,926
Product dimensions:
0.55(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

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Meet the Author

Jessica B. Harris is one of a handful of African Americans who have achieved prominence in the culinary world. She holds a PhD from NYU, teaches English at Queens College, and lectures internationally. Her articles have appeared in Vogue, Food & Wine, Essence, and The New Yorker, among other publications; she has made numerous television and radio appearances and has been profiled in The New York Times. Considered one of the preeminent scholars of the food of the African Diaspora, Harris has been inducted into the James Beard Who's Who in Food and Beverage in America, received an honorary doctorate from Johnson & Wales University, holds awards from sources too numerous to note, and recently helped the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture to conceptualize its cafeteria.

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