Skylight Confessions [NOOK Book]

Overview

Writing at the height of her powers, Alice Hoffman conjures three generations of a family haunted by love.     Cool, practical, and deliberate, John is dreamy Arlyn's polar opposite. Yet the two are drawn powerfully together even when it is clear they are bound to bring each other grief. Their difficult marriage leads them and their children to a house made of glass in theConnecticut countryside, to the avenues of Manhattan, and to the blue waters of Long Island Sound. Glass breaks, love ...
See more details below
Skylight Confessions

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

Writing at the height of her powers, Alice Hoffman conjures three generations of a family haunted by love.     Cool, practical, and deliberate, John is dreamy Arlyn's polar opposite. Yet the two are drawn powerfully together even when it is clear they are bound to bring each other grief. Their difficult marriage leads them and their children to a house made of glass in theConnecticut countryside, to the avenues of Manhattan, and to the blue waters of Long Island Sound. Glass breaks, love hurts, and families make their own rules. Ultimately, it falls to their grandson, Will, to solve the emotional puzzle of his family and of his own identity.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
On the day of her father's funeral, 17-year-old Arlyn Singer carves out the terms of her family's destiny. She decides impulsively that the great love of her life will be the first man she encounters on the street. Yalie John Moody, the son of a famous architect, slips into the role when, later that day, he asks Arlyn for directions. Perhaps not surprisingly, the marriage is a disaster; Arlyn takes a lover, then dies giving birth to her second child. Alice Hoffman's Skylight Confessions follows her survivors as they play the cards dealt out by a teenager's whim. Lines of destiny; lives of choice.
Publishers Weekly

Winningham's narration is just right. Her pronunciation is clear but not exaggerated, and nicely combined with the rhythmic, conversational speed of a good storyteller. She has a rich voice with a good vocal range. This book is another of the wildly popular "ghost" romances that come under the rubric "woman's fiction," and another of Hoffman's dark fairy tales. Orphaned at 17, Arlie determines to love and marry the first man who comes down the street. This is John Moody, a "distant, quiet man" who ignores her and her children throughout their marriage, but is plagued by her ghost after her early death. Arlie's ghost is visible only to Moody and to the narrator, Meredith, who follows the ghost home to the glass house where Arlie lived out her miserable marriage and died. The book is loaded with telltale names and laborious symbols—ashes, dishes, stones, bones, birds, glass and all things red or white—but the characters are as human as fairy tale permits, and Hoffman's prose is lively and absorbing. This book will be a favorite of women's fiction and Hoffman fans. Simultaneous release with the Little, Brown hardcover (Reviews, Nov. 6). (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Publishers Weekly
In Hoffman's 19th novel, a young woman becomes the victim of the destiny she's created, leaving behind a splintered family. On the day of her father's funeral, 17-year-old Arlyn Singer decides the first man who walks down the street will be her one love. That night, Yale senior John Moody stops to ask directions, and Arlyn and John take the first passionate steps toward what will become a marriage of heartache and mutual betrayal. After John's architect father dies, the couple moves into his Connecticut home, a glass house called the Glass Slipper, and Arlyn has an affair with a local laborer. She dies while her second child is still young, and the story forks to follow the divergent paths taken by the Moody children. Sam, the self-destructive first-born, spray paints his angst all over lower Manhattan and has a son before disappearing. Blanca, Sam's sister and the only family member he loves, moves to London and opens a bookstore. John remarries, to Cynthia, and has another daughter, but carries a family secret with him to his grave. Ghostly apparitions lend an air of dark enchantment, though the numerous dream sequences feel heavy-handed. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
A Connecticut ferryboat captain dies, leaving his motherless 17-year-old daughter, Arlyn, an orphan. On the day of his funeral, red-haired Arlie invites fate into her home and her bed in the form of John Moody, a lost Yale student of architecture, thus cementing a multigenerational dance of misery. Moody spent three days loving Arlie and a lifetime resenting their marriage. And he has little interest in their son, Sam, a fragile little boy devoted to his mother. It is Sam's train wreck of an adolescence that is at the heart of Hoffman's 19th novel. Arlie's early death strands Sam; baby Blanca; Arlie's lover, George Snow; and even Moody in separate emotional hells. They are only partially saved by the appearance of Meredith, a college student who follows Arlie's ghost to the Moody home and signs on as the nanny. Hoffman's gift for framing otherworldly elements in down-to-earth language intensifies the flawed resolve of the tragic Moodys as they desperately pummel their way through loss and grief and, maybe, redemption. Highly recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 9/15/06.] Beth E. Andersen, Ann Arbor Dist. Lib., MI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A Yale senior loses his way on Long Island, and three generations suffer the consequences in this haunting latest from Hoffman (The Ice Queen, 2005, etc.). Convinced that he's the true love she promised herself as her father lay dying, orphaned 17-year-old Arlie Singer seduces John Moody moments after he stops to ask for directions. Stunned by his recklessness, the normally cautious and tidy John hightails it back to college. But Arlie will not be denied, so they are married too young, have baby Sam too soon and, after John's parents move to Florida, are trapped full-time in the Glass Slipper, an all-windows house designed by his father, a famous architect. John ignores his own brilliant, odd son and hardly ever comes home from work. Arlie, realizing she's made a terrible mistake, falls in love with George Snow, who washes the Glass Slipper's windows. She won't leave Sam, even after she has George's baby-John, typically, seems oblivious-but she's stricken with breast cancer and dead at 25. Sam grows up angry and bereft; at 16, he has a full-fledged drug habit, and even his devoted ten-year-old sister Blanca can't keep him in the house he hates with the father he loathes. Hoffman spins a grim fairy tale, complete with an unsympathetic stepmother (Cynthia, who was sleeping with John before Arlie died) and a strange nanny (Meredith, who follows John to Connecticut because she's the only one besides him who sees Arlie's ghost hovering around). But while unsparingly depicting the awful damage unhappy people inflict on each other, the author refuses to provide villains; even clueless, thoughtless John is at heart terrified and remorseful. His final actions suggest that it's never too late tosee the truth, and that terrible mistakes can sometimes be at least partially atoned for-but this is a very sad story. Nonetheless, the ending offers hope for Blanca and a surprising posthumous redemption for desperate, doomed Sam. Achingly beautiful and filled with heart-wrenchingly real characters: one of Hoffman's best. Agent: Elaine Markson/Elaine Markson Literary Agency
Donna Seaman
Hoffman's shimmering, multigenerational melodrama bewitches with supernatural imagery while imaginatively dramatizing all-too-common heartaches.
Booklist
Ann Harleman
Among the many pleasures of Skylight Confessions is a sense of continuous corner-turning, a chain of surprises. . . . Skylight Confessions is about the unresolvable contradictions that lie at the heart of life.
Boston Globe
Good Housekeeping
"Hoffman's brand of magical realism squeezes caring out of hard-to-reach places and ends up being a celebration of love."
Parade
"Wholly original and haunting."
Victoria A. Brownworth
Hoffman is one of our great storytellers and one who knows the American family in all its many facets. In Skylight Confessions, she has once again written a story and characters that are truly unforgettable. A novel to be savored.
Baltimore Sun
Gail Pennington
Haunting. . . . This isn't just Hoffman's best recent novel; it's one of the best of a distinguished list. . . . Long after the last page is turned, the characters and their stories are impossible to forget.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Martha Woodall
Alice Hoffman remains a literary sorceress par excellence. . . . In a novel that unfolds like a dream, Hoffman reminds readers that love and family create the most potent magic of all.
Philadelphia Inquirer
Andrea Chapin
Alice Hoffman has written her most spellbinding, accomplished novel yet. . . . Although this is Hoffman's nineteenth book, it feels utterly fresh. Her voice — touched by the cadences of fairy tales — buoys us through the novel's saddest currents.
More
Andrea Chapin - More
"Alice Hoffman has written her most spellbinding, accomplished novel yet. . . . Although this is Hoffman's nineteenth book, it feels utterly fresh. Her voice -- touched by the cadences of fairy tales -- buoys us through the novel's saddest currents."
Gail Pennington - St. Louis Post-Dispatch
"Haunting. . . . This isn't just Hoffman's best recent novel; it's one of the best of a distinguished list. . . . Long after the last page is turned, the characters and their stories are impossible to forget."
Martha Woodall - Philadelphia Inquirer
"Alice Hoffman remains a literary sorceress par excellence. . . . In a novel that unfolds like a dream, Hoffman reminds readers that love and family create the most potent magic of all."
Donna Seaman - Booklist
"Hoffman's shimmering, multigenerational melodrama bewitches with supernatural imagery while imaginatively dramatizing all-too-common heartaches."
Victoria A. Brownworth - Baltimore Sun
"Hoffman is one of our great storytellers and one who knows the American family in all its many facets. In Skylight Confessions, she has once again written a story and characters that are truly unforgettable. A novel to be savored."
Ann Harleman - Boston Globe
"Among the many pleasures of Skylight Confessions is a sense of continuous corner-turning, a chain of surprises. . . . Skylight Confessions is about the unresolvable contradictions that lie at the heart of life."
From the Publisher
"Hoffman's shimmering, multigenerational melodrama bewitches with supernatural imagery while imaginatively dramatizing all-too-common heartaches."—Donna Seaman, Booklist

"Among the many pleasures of Skylight Confessions is a sense of continuous corner-turning, a chain of surprises. . . . Skylight Confessions is about the unresolvable contradictions that lie at the heart of life."—Ann Harleman, Boston Globe

"Hoffman's brand of magical realism squeezes caring out of hard-to-reach places and ends up being a celebration of love."—Good Housekeeping

"Wholly original and haunting."—Parade

"Hoffman is one of our great storytellers and one who knows the American family in all its many facets. In Skylight Confessions, she has once again written a story and characters that are truly unforgettable. A novel to be savored."—Victoria A. Brownworth, Baltimore Sun

"Haunting. . . . This isn't just Hoffman's best recent novel; it's one of the best of a distinguished list. . . . Long after the last page is turned, the characters and their stories are impossible to forget."—Gail Pennington, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Alice Hoffman remains a literary sorceress par excellence. . . . In a novel that unfolds like a dream, Hoffman reminds readers that love and family create the most potent magic of all."—Martha Woodall, Philadelphia Inquirer

"Alice Hoffman has written her most spellbinding, accomplished novel yet. . . . Although this is Hoffman's nineteenth book, it feels utterly fresh. Her voice — touched by the cadences of fairy tales — buoys us through the novel's saddest currents."—Andrea Chapin, More

"Achingly beautiful and filled with heart-wrenchingly real characters: one of Hoffman's best."—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780759516595
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 1/11/2007
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 214,784
  • File size: 639 KB

Meet the Author

Alice Hoffman is the bestselling author of seventeen acclaimed novels, including The Ice Queen, Practical Magic, Here on Earth, The River King, Blue Diary, Illumination Night, Turtle Moon, Seventh Heaven, and At Risk, as well as the highly praised story collections Local Girls and Blackbird House.

Biography

Born in the 1950s to college-educated parents who divorced when she was young, Alice Hoffman was raised by her single, working mother in a blue-collar Long Island neighborhood. Although she felt like an outsider growing up, she discovered that these feelings of not quite belonging positioned her uniquely to observe people from a distance. Later, she would hone this viewpoint in stories that captured the full intensity of the human experience.

After high school, Hoffman went to work for the Doubleday factory in Garden City. But the eight-hour, supervised workday was not for her, and she quit before lunch on her first day! She enrolled in night school at Adelphi University, graduating in 1971 with a degree in English. She went on to attend Stanford University's Creative Writing Center on a Mirrellees Fellowship. Her mentor at Stanford, the great teacher and novelist Albert Guerard, helped to get her first story published in the literary magazine Fiction. The story attracted the attention of legendary editor Ted Solotaroff, who asked if she had written any longer fiction. She hadn't -- but immediately set to work. In 1977, when Hoffman was 25, her first novel, Property Of, was published to great fanfare.

Since that remarkable debut, Hoffman has carved herself a unique niche in American fiction. A favorite with teens as well as adults, she renders life's deepest mysteries immediately understandable in stories suffused with magic realism and a dreamy, fairy-tale sensibility. (In a 1994 article for The New York Times, interviewer Ruth Reichl described the magic in Hoffman's books as a casual, regular occurrence -- "...so offhand that even the most skeptical reader can accept it.") Her characters' lives are transformed by uncontrollable forces -- love and loss, sorrow and bliss, danger and death.

Hoffman's 1997 novel Here on Earth was selected as an Oprah Book Club pick, but even without Winfrey's powerful endorsement, her books have become huge bestsellers -- including three that have been adapted for the movies: Practical Magic (1995), The River King (2000), and her YA fable Aquamarine (2001).

Hoffman is a breast cancer survivor; and like many people who consider themselves blessed with luck, she believes strongly in giving back. For this reason, she donated her advance from her 1999 short story collection Local Girls to help create the Hoffman Breast Center at Mt. Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, MA.

Good To Know

  • Hoffman has written a number of children's books, including Fireflies: A Winter's Tale(1999), Horsefly (2000), and Moondog (2004).

  • Aquamarine was written for Hoffman's best friend, Jo Ann, who dreamed of the freedom of mermaids as she battled brain cancer.

  • Here on Earth is a modern version of Hoffman's favorite novel, Wuthering Heights.

  • Hoffman has been honored with the Massachusetts Book Award for her teen novel Incantation.
  • Read More Show Less
      1. Hometown:
        Boston, Massachusetts
      1. Date of Birth:
        March 16, 1952
      2. Place of Birth:
        New York, New York
      1. Education:
        B.A., Adelphi University, 1973; M.A., Stanford University, 1974
      2. Website:

    Read an Excerpt

    Skylight Confessions

    A Novel
    By Alice Hoffman

    LITTLE, BROWN

    Copyright © 2007 Alice Hoffman
    All right reserved.

    ISBN: 0-316-05878-5


    Chapter One

    Ghost Wife

    SHE WAS HIS FIRST WIFE, BUT AT THE MOMENT when he first saw her she was a seventeen-year-old girl named Arlyn Singer who stood out on the front porch on an evening that seemed suspended in time. Arlyn's father had just died and the funeral dinner had ended only hours earlier. It was a somber gathering: a dozen neighbors seated around the heavy mahogany dining-room table no one had used for over a decade. Now there were pans of macaroni and cheese and a red velvet cake and a huge platter of fruit, food enough to last a month if Arlie had had an appetite.

    Arlyn's father had been a ferryboat captain, the center of her world, especially in his last years; the captain had burned brighter in the grasp of his illness, a shining star in the dark. A usually silent man, he began to tell stories. There were tales of rocks that appeared in the dark, of mysterious reefs whose only purpose seemed to be to sink ferries, of the drowned men he'd known who had never come back. With a red crayon, he drew charts of stars that could lead a lost man home. He told of a tribe who lived on the other side of the water, in far-off Connecticut, who could sprout wings in the face of disaster. They looked like normal people until the ship went down, or the fire raged, and then they suddenly revealed themselves. Only then did they manage their escape.

    On his night table there was a collection of stones the captain said he had swallowed when he was a young man; he'd gone down with a ship and had been the lone survivor. One minute he'd been standing on deck, and the next, he'd been above it all, in the sky. He'd fallen hard and fast into the surf of Connecticut, with a mouth and a belly full of stones.

    When the doctor came to tell the captain there was no hope, they had a drink together and instead of ice the captain put a stone in the cups of whiskey.

    It will bring you good luck, he'd told the doctor. All I want is for my daughter to be happy. That's all the luck I need.

    Arlyn had sobbed at his bedside and begged her father not to leave her, but that was not an option or a choice. The last advice the captain had given her, while his voice still held out, was that the future was an unknown and unexpected country, and that Arlyn should be prepared for almost anything. She had been grief stricken as her father lay dying but now she felt weightless, the way people do when they're no longer sure they have a reason to be connected to this world. The slightest breeze could have carried her away, into the night sky, across the universe.

    Arlyn held on to the porch banister and leaned out over the azaleas. Red and pink flowers, filled with buds. Arlyn was an optimist, despite her current situation. She was young enough not to see a glass as half empty or half full, but as a beautiful object into which anything might be poured. She whispered a bargain, as though her whispering could make it true.

    The first man who walks down the street will be my one love and I will be true to him as long as he's true to me.

    She turned around twice and held her breath as a way to seal the bargain. She wore her favorite shoes, ones her father had bought her in Connecticut, leather slippers so light she felt as though she were barefoot. Her red hair reached her waist. She had seventy-four freckles on her face - she had counted - and a long, straight nose her father had assured her was elegant rather than large. She watched the sky darken. There was a line of ashes up above, a sprinkling of chimney soot. Perhaps her father was up there, watching over her. Perhaps he was knocking on his casket, begging to be let out. Or maybe he was here with her still, in her heart, making it difficult for her to breathe whenever she thought about her life without him. Arlie felt her aloneness inside her, but she was hopeful, too. The past was done with. Now she was made out of glass, transparent and clear. She was an instant in time. One damp evening, two stars in the sky, a line of soot, a chattering gathering of neighbors who barely knew her in the dining room. She had convinced herself that her future would arrive on the street where she'd lived her whole life if only she'd wait long enough. If she trusted in fate.

    In the living room, people spoke about Arlyn as though she had died right along with her father. She wasn't a pretty girl, after all, just plain and freckly. She had a high-school diploma and, as far as anyone could tell, no particular skills. One summer she'd worked in an ice-cream shop, and in high school she'd had a dog-washing service, shampooing basset hounds and poodles in the kitchen sink. An ordinary girl all alone in a house where the roof might blow off in the next big storm. People felt pity, but as everyone knew, that wasn't an emotion that lasted long.

    A low horn sounded as the ferry came across the water from Bridgeport; the fact that there would be fog tonight was discussed as the women cleaned up, wiping off the table, putting away the pound cakes and the casseroles before going out to the porch to say good night to Arlyn. It was a heavy, salt-laced fog that had settled, the kind that circled lampposts and street signs and made folks lose their way. A damp, soft night. The neighbors assumed that once they'd left, Arlyn would go inside her empty house. Surely she would walk along the hall where her father's coats still hung on the rack, then take the flight of stairs the captain hadn't been able to manage for the past six months. She would edge past his silent room. No more coughing all night long. No more calls for water.

    But Arlyn stayed where she was. She was so cold her skin felt like ice; still she remained on the porch. Her father had said to prepare for the future, and Arlyn was ready and willing. Her destiny was sure to come to her in her darkest hour. That was now, this damp, sad night. It took some time, but after three hours Arlie's faith was rewarded. By then the fog had turned to a light rain and the streets smelled like fish. A car stopped; there was a young man inside, lost, on his way to a party. When he got out to ask directions, Arlyn noticed he was taller than her father. She liked tall men. His hair was combed back. He had beautiful pale eyes, a cool gray color. As he approached he shouted, "Hello." His voice was not what she expected - flat and nasal. That didn't matter. Anything could happen now.

    Arlyn took a step back in order to study him. Perhaps the young man thought she was afraid - a stranger stopping to talk to her in a banged-up old Saab his dad had given him. He could have been anyone, after all. A murderer, an ex-con, a man who would rip the heart from her chest.

    "I'm lost," the young man explained. Usually he would have kept on driving; he had never in his life stopped to ask for directions. But he was late, and he was the sort of person who was usually on time. Veering from punctuality made him anxious; it made him do stupid things. For instance, he had circled around this particular block twice. Before leaving, he'd forgotten to check to make sure his gas tank was full and now he worried that he wouldn't be able to find a service station before he ran out.

    The young man's name was John Moody and he was a senior at Yale studying architecture; he recognized Arlie's father's house as an Italianate worker's cottage, built, he would guess, in the 1860s, common in these North Shore towns on Long Island. Not kept up, of course - the roof looked like flypaper, the shingles were badly in need of paint - but charming in a run-down way just as the girl with the long red hair was charming despite her dreadful clothes and the freckles scattered across her pale skin.

    Arlyn was wearing an overcoat though it was April.

    "You're freezing," John Moody said.

    Arlyn took this as concern rather than mere statement of fact. The truth was, she was shivering in the cold light of her future, the light that had been cast by this tall young man who had no idea where he was.

    Arlyn felt faint. Fluttery, really. Her whole life had been spent in a cocoon; she had been waiting for this hanging globe of an evening. This is when everything else begins. Whatever happens next is where my life will lead me.

    John Moody came up the porch steps. Rickety. In need of repair. John took a moment to catch his breath, then spoke.

    "I've never met the person having the party. My roommate Nathaniel's sister. I don't even know why I'm here."

    His heart was pounding uncomfortably hard. His father had had a heart attack earlier in the year. Was he having one, too? Well, he'd never liked speaking to strangers; he'd never liked speaking at all. John Moody was a champion of quiet and order. Architecture meant rules one could depend upon. He was a devotee of the clean line and of truth in form, without frills or complications. He didn't like messes of any sort.

    Arlyn looked over the directions John's roommate had given him. They were all wrong. "If you want to go to Smithtown, you turn at the corner by the harbor and keep going west. Four towns over."

    "That far?" John Moody had been working hard at Yale throughout the semester, trying to distinguish himself; all at once he felt exhausted. "I didn't realize I was so tired."

    Arlyn understood. "Sometimes you don't know how tired you are until you close your eyes."

    There was no rush, was there? Time was suspended; it wasn't moving at all. They went inside and John Moody lay down on the couch. He had long legs and large feet and he fell asleep easily. He could not remember the last time he'd had a dream. "Just for a minute," he said. "Until I get my second wind."

    Arlyn sat on a hard-backed chair, still wearing her overcoat, still shivering. She watched John fall asleep. She had the feeling that whatever happened next would be the true test of whether or not they were meant to be. John's eyelids fluttered; his chest rose and fell. He was a beautiful sleeper, calm, unmoving, peaceful. It felt so right to have him there. The room was littered with chairs that had been pulled into a circle by the visiting neighbors. When Arlyn's father had been at his worst, in such pain he had to be sedated into sleep, he had moaned and thrashed in his dreams and tore at the bedsheets. Sometimes Arlyn would leave him, just for a short time, for a breath of air, a moment alone. She'd walk down to the harbor and look into the darkness. She could hear the water, but she couldn't see it; she couldn't see anything at all. All she'd wanted, then and now, was a man who could sleep. At last he was here.

    Arlie left John Moody and went into the kitchen. She hadn't eaten for three days and she realized she was famished. Arlie went to the refrigerator and took out nearly everything - the tins of baked beans, the homemade strudels, the ham, the sweet-potato pie, the last piece of red velvet cake. She sat at the table and ate three days' worth of food. When she was finished she went to the sink, filled it with soapy water, and cleaned the pots and pans.

    She was so full no one could accuse her of being light-headed. She was rational. No doubt about it. She knew what she was doing. She took off her coat, her black dress, her slip, her underwear, even the soft leather shoes her father had bought her. She turned out the light. Her breath moved inside her ribs like a butterfly. In and out. Waiting. If he walks through the door, my life will begin. And indeed, when John Moody came into the kitchen, time hurtled forward, no longer suspended. He was walking to her, shocked by his good fortune and by the dreaminess of the evening, the extreme weirdness of setting out from Yale as a bored college boy and ending up here, in this kitchen. Arlie looked like a ghost, someone he'd imagined, a woman made of moonlight and milk. The neighbors who thought she was too plain to notice would have been surprised to know that all John Moody could see was Arlie's beautiful nakedness and her long red hair. He would never have imagined they thought of her as ugly and useless.

    As for Arlyn, if nothing ever happened to her again, this would be enough. The way he circled his arms around her, the way the dishes in the dish rack fell to the floor, the good white china in shards and neither one of them caring. She had never been kissed before; she'd been too busy with bedpans, morphine, the practical details of death.

    "This is crazy," John Moody said, not that he intended to stop. Not that he could.

    Would he hold this against her, years and years later, how waylaid he'd become? Would he say she tricked him with a rare beauty no one had noticed before? All Arlyn knew was that when she led him to her bedroom, he followed. It was a girl's bedroom with lace runners on the bureaus and milk-glass lamps; it didn't even seem to belong to her anymore. The way time was moving, so fast, so intense, made her shudder. She was about to make the leap from one world to the next, from the over and done to the what could be.

    Arlyn went forward into time and space; she looped her arms around John Moody's neck. She felt his kiss on her throat, her shoulders, her breasts. He had been lost and she had found him. He had asked for directions and she had told him which way to go. He was whispering, Thank you, as though she had given him a great gift. Perhaps she had given him exactly that: her self, her future, her fate.

    HE STAYED FOR THREE DAYS, THE ENTIRE TIME SPENT IN bed; he was crazy for her, hypnotized, not wanting food or water, only her. She tasted like pears. How odd that was, that sweet green flavor, and even odder that he should notice. John didn't usually pay attention to people, but he did now. Arlie's hands were small and beautiful and her teeth were small and perfect as well, but she had large feet, as he did. The sign of a walker, a doer, a person who completed tasks and never complained. She seemed neat and uncomplicated, everything he admired. He did not know her name until the first morning, didn't learn of her father's death until the second. And then on the third morning John Moody awoke suddenly from a dream, the first dream he could remember having in many years, perhaps since he was a child. He'd been in the house he'd grown up in, a renowned construction his architect father had built outside New Haven that people called the Glass Slipper, for it was made out of hundreds of windows woven together with thin bands of polished steel. In his dream, John Moody was carrying a basket of pears along the hallway. Outside there was an ice storm and the glass house had become opaque. It was difficult to see where he was going at first, and then impossible.

    John was lost, though the floor plan was simple, one he had known his whole life. His father was a great believer in minimalism, known for it, lauded for his straight lines stacked one upon another, as though a building could be made purely from space and glass. John Moody looked down to see why the basket he carried had become so heavy. Everything was odd: the way his heart was pounding, the confusion he felt. Stranger still: the pears in the basket had become flat black stones. Before he could stop them the stones arose without being touched; they hurtled up through the air as though they'd been fired from a cannon, breaking the windows of the Glass Slipper, one after the other. Everything shattered and the sky came tumbling into the house. Cloud and bird and wind and snow.

    John Moody awoke in Arlyn's arms, in a room he did not recognize. There was a white sheet over him, and his chest was constricted with fear. He had to get out. He was in the wrong place; that was all too clear to him now. Wrong time, wrong girl, wrong everything. Next to him, Arlie's red hair fell across the pillow. In this light, true morning light, it was the color of the human heart, of blood. It seemed unnatural, not a color that he, who preferred muted tones, would ever be drawn to.

    Arlie raised herself onto one elbow. "What?" she said sleepily.

    "Nothing. Go back to sleep."

    (Continues...)



    Excerpted from Skylight Confessions by Alice Hoffman Copyright © 2007 by Alice Hoffman. Excerpted by permission.
    All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
    Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
    Read More Show Less

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4
    ( 49 )
    Rating Distribution

    5 Star

    (20)

    4 Star

    (14)

    3 Star

    (5)

    2 Star

    (4)

    1 Star

    (6)

    Your Rating:

    Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

    Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

    Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

    Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

    We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

    What to exclude from your review:

    Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

    Reviews should not contain any of the following:

    • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
    • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
    • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
    • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
    • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
    • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
    • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

    Reminder:

    • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
    • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
    • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
    Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

    Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

    Create a Pen Name

    Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

     
    Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

    Continue Anonymously
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews
    • Posted September 19, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      ....

      I got this book while ready to leave barnes and noble. i usually read YA books and i hadnt found anything good that day. Before leaving, my mom saw it and saw the price (bargain book...yup thats how she picks her books) feeling discuraged and wanting a book, i got it. but when i got home all i did was store it in my bookcase, it wasnt until like 7 months later that i had nothing to read and found it again. i had half the book in an hour. This is one of the most amazing, touching, scary novels i have ever read. it was so heart wrenching that i couldnt finish it. It is an amazing book. you see all the changes that happen and the you find yourself lost and feeling empty at the departure of the characters as the story goes by. this book will prove to be amazing for adults. But i felt really really depressed by the middle.like life was being shown to me, and it was really hard to see that all happening in the story could be so true in real life. it could happen to me. i couldnt finish it. i felt like crying and really sad. i know i will finish it one day. i have not read any book so...amzingly crafted. so i trully recomend it.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 21, 2009

      Good read

      This was my second Alice Hoffman novel; I bought it while out of town to keep me busy in the hotel room at night. It did the job and I was intrigued to see that it followed the same pattern as the firt I read, Third Angel. It was three stories in one whose main characters had soem connection. I enjoyed it very much. I am curious if more of her novels follow the same format. I look forward to reading more of her work.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted December 9, 2008

      more from this reviewer

      Fantastic

      With the death of her dad, seventeen years old Arlie Singer feels all alone, her mother having died years ago. She vows that the first male she meets is her true love whom she will marry. Yale student John Moody stops to ask Arlie for directions, but instead of continuing his journey she seduces him as her true love. John returns to school, but Arlie follows. They marry, she gives birth to Sam, and when his parents retire, the couple moves into the Glass Slipper, an all glass home.----------------- John ignores his troubled offspring and has even less time for his wife. Arlie knows she made a mistake when she meets George Snow, who cleans her home¿s windows. Though she has a baby by George she will not leave her son for him. Not even ten years into their dysfunctional marriage Arlie dies from breast cancer.------------------ Sam is an angry man who hates his father and his stepmother as John remarried almost to the day of Arlie's death. Sam vanishes while his younger sister Blanca feels like an outsider since Cynthia became her stepmother. When she has a chance she flees to open up a bookstore in London though her nanny Meredith, who along with John see Arlie's ghost, has another offspring to raise as Cynthia gives John a third offspring.--------------- The key cast members seem so real in their dysfunctional relationships and their overall destructive personal behavior that in turn the story line is depressing yet there is twinkling of possible redemption if one accepts responsibility for errors. The key to this somewhat morbid tale is the characters as the sins of the parents (including the stepmother) are replayed by the children. The paranormal element seems too Hamlet-like, but still fans of deep family dramas will want to follow the seemingly ill-fated obliteration of people who fear the truth when that is the only means of salvation from one¿s destructive genes.---------------- Harriet Klausner

      2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 30, 2012

      Gorgeously grippin g Gorgeously gripping.

      Worth reading. I loved 'Practical Magic' so much (I still like it better) but this was totally different and seperate and I was not dissapointed. The characters still stay with me and I was emerged in the book start to finish. I was caught off by how much I really loved this. Thankyou Alice!

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted December 17, 2010

      more from this reviewer

      Another wonderful Hoffman novel.

      Every time I pick up an unread Hoffman novel I am amazed by her skill with the written word. The way she can form a sentence, twist it into something ethereal and beautiful, it always leaves me breathless. I always feel cleansed and well-read after a Hoffman novel, as though the books I finished leading up to her works were trivial and here is something of worth to spend my time on.

      Following four generations of the Moody family who live in the Glass Slipper in suburban Connecticut, Skylight Confessions begins with Arlyn Singer and John Moody as they meet under strange circumstances and form a bond that will affect their children and their grandchildren to come. Under the glass roof and clear walls of their house, secrets are kept and hidden. Mysterious occurrences are swept under the rug, and lives are forever changed by the decisions of others. Following the Moody children into their separate lives as they're drawn back to the Glass Slipper, Hoffman tells a truly character driven story, so intent are we upon Arlyn and John, and the residents of the glass house that we easily forget there's a world beyond them.

      Skylight Confessions contains the usual hint of magic that Hoffman is known for, but the writing is a little less sad than the previous works I've read by her. Or maybe I'm just accustomed to her tone now. The story of the Moody children is beautiful and touching, and in such a short book it's amazing that we come to know them as well as we do.

      Another remarkable Hoffman with all my favorite trademarks, empathetic with a hint of magical realism. All in all, a fabulous book and another great addition to my library. Highly recommended to those who have not read an Alice Hoffman novel yet.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 4, 2010

      Excellent read

      The characters really capture the imagination and you can see the book open up like a movie

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 15, 2008

      Best of Alice

      This was the best novel I have read of Ms. Hoffman's to date. It was a grave and ensightful view into life and beyond. Love and loss, and human beauty that never dies.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 12, 2007

      Great book for a weekend read

      I have been reading Alice Hoffman for many years and always enjoy her style of writing. I particularly enjoyed this book and really felt that she brought the characters alive. I really cared about them and didn't want the book to end. Though the book is sad, I think it gives the reader hope at the end.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 7, 2014

      No one is better at the art of writing than Alice Hoffman. She

      No one is better at the art of writing than Alice Hoffman. She is magical!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 15, 2013

      Great book

      Mystical, thought-provoking, and very well-written

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 25, 2013

      Great book

      One of my favorite alice hoffman books, a wonderful journey through different generations of a familh

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted August 8, 2012

      SKYCLAN CLEARING

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted July 12, 2012

      more from this reviewer

      I am very disappointed in this book, my first Alice Hoffman nove

      I am very disappointed in this book, my first Alice Hoffman novel and it just didn't hold my attention. I'm not giving up, however, plan to try and try again as the descriptons of her other books do look intriguing !!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted January 7, 2012

      Read this

      Enthralling, mesmerising, heartbreaking. I bawled my eyes out. Read this.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted October 7, 2011

      Depressing

      When I first started reading the book I couldn't stay with it. I didn't know if anything would actually happen. I almost didn't bother to finish it. It was kind of interesting enough to keep me reading til the end. I guess I had some hope for it, but not really. This was the first novel I've read by Alice Hoffman. I didn't like this one well enough to read any of her others. Good thing I only paid $3 for it at Dollar General.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 19, 2011

      one of my favorites

      I love Alice Hoffman and have read most of her books, but this was a standout for me. Truly enjoyed it. I kept thinking about the characters. It is not necessarily an easy read, so if you are looking for fluff, turn elsewhere. But it is realistic and truly engaging. I kept thinking about it weeks after reading it.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 28, 2010

      I Also Recommend:

      Not likely to keep you up at night

      The book started off horribly. The initial premise was so far-fetched that it was hard to take seriously. The writing was horrendous and jumped from idea to idea with little cohesiveness. If you stick with it, it does get better. The characters that started off dry and detached became more interesting when forced to face their own character flaws. The book in the end left a better impression than its individual parts. If you like a little romance/family intrigue and a little exploration of the supernatural, it would be a good quick read. Beyond that, there's not much to offer that you haven't seen before.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 29, 2009

      Not recommended

      I could not even get halfway through reading this book. The characters were flat, story was confusing and writing style was boring.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted June 29, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      I Also Recommend:

      MY FAVORITE MOST DEFINITELY

      I read The Third Angel first. I thought it was the most touching, haunting and memorable Alice Hoffman book I'd ever read until I read Skylight Confessions. The story is sad but realistic. The characters are well-defined and easy to identify with. I was also going through a rough emotional period when I read it. It served its purpose as source of entertainment and as a means of therapy. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in reading anyone of her novels, but, I warn those who do that her others may pale in comparison.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted April 27, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      One of my top 10 faves.

      This was a book I finished last week and cannot stop thinking about. The characters were like none other and the plot is so fantastic that words don't describe it. Very meloncholy and bittersweet- not a light- hearted read at all. Wonderful- Alice Hoffman is genius.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)