The Slave
  • Alternative view 1 of The Slave
  • Alternative view 2 of The Slave

The Slave

5.0 2
by Isaac Bashevis Singer
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Four years after the Chmielnicki massacres of the seventeenth century, Jacob, a slave and cowherd in a Polish village high in the mountains, falls in love with Wanda, his master's daughter. Even after he is ransomed, he finds he can't live without her, and the two escape together to a distant Jewish community. Racked by his consciousness of sin in taking a Gentile

Overview

Four years after the Chmielnicki massacres of the seventeenth century, Jacob, a slave and cowherd in a Polish village high in the mountains, falls in love with Wanda, his master's daughter. Even after he is ransomed, he finds he can't live without her, and the two escape together to a distant Jewish community. Racked by his consciousness of sin in taking a Gentile wife and by the difficulties of concealing her identity, Jacob nonetheless stands firm as the violence of the era threatens to destroy the ill-fated couple.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The Slave is a burningly radiant, intensely beautiful book. Singer is answering his age like a prophet.” —Ted Hughes, The New York Review of Books

“A peerless storyteller, Singer restores teh sheer enchantment with story, with outcome, with what-happens-next that has been denied most readers since their adolescence. There is about him a bardic quality that gives The Slave the strength and authority of a timeless folktale.” —David Boroff, Saturday Review

Library Journal
Jacob is a Jew, a pogrom survivor, and a slave of Polish peasants; he lives a simple life as a cowherd, tolerated only because of his skills with animals. Against both Jewish and secular law, he falls in love with Wanda, a Christian. Ransomed by his hometown, he flees with Wanda and begins a new life. But because conversion of Christians is against the law and Wanda (now called Sara) cannot speak Yiddish, she must pose as a mute. In the throes of labor, Wanda finally speaks, dies, and is buried as an outcast, outside the Jewish cemetery. Jacob picks up his son and emigrates to the Holy Land, not to return for 20 years. Except for a few references to specific historical events, this story, set in the late 17th century, is timeless. It is read in alternating sections by two highly competent narrators, Tracy Sallows and David Chandler. The transitions between readers are smooth and add interest to the presentation. Recommended for moderate to large audio fiction collections; a necessary purchase for all Jewish libraries with literature collections.-I. Pour-El, Des Moines Area Community Coll., Boone, IA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374506803
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
10/28/1988
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
307,337
Product dimensions:
5.53(w) x 8.31(h) x 0.82(d)

Meet the Author

Isaac Bashevis Singer (1904-91) was the author of many novels, stories, children's book, and memoirs. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
July 14, 1904
Date of Death:
July 24, 1991
Place of Birth:
Radzymin, Poland
Place of Death:
Surfside, Florida
Education:
Attended Tachkemoni Rabbinical Seminary in Warsaw, Poland, 1920-27

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Slave 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What is life about? This book is not allowed to read, this who reads fall in love with simple people with very small possibilities to live together, but they wish. Only freedom is in mind and she has chosen him freely. That is the book to make souls rich in their remembering connected with one line: the love between two people out of the time. I very like their story; this is love of the heart.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A story of a Jewish man back in history. A tale of life. Kind of simbalic. It is a rival to The Chosen and The Promise. It is, in my opinion, better than those two books. More interesting at least.