Slave Nation: How Slavery United the Colonies & Sparked the American Revolution

Slave Nation: How Slavery United the Colonies & Sparked the American Revolution

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by Alfred Blumrosen, Alfred W. Blumrosen, Ruth G. Blumrosen
     
 

Did efforts by England to abolish the colonial slave trade spark the American Revolution? Slave Nation, a provocative appraisal of the events leading up to 1776 and beyond, offers evidence that America's war of independence was fueled in part by concerns that England's outspoken stand against slavery within its own borders might endanger the economic well-beingSee more details below

Overview

Did efforts by England to abolish the colonial slave trade spark the American Revolution? Slave Nation, a provocative appraisal of the events leading up to 1776 and beyond, offers evidence that America's war of independence was fueled in part by concerns that England's outspoken stand against slavery within its own borders might endanger the economic well-being of colonists who depended on slave labor to earn a living from their land.

Alfred and Ruth Blumrosen, both professors of law and experts in Civil Rights compliance, base their controversial conclusions on a little-known case that roiled the Court of King's Bench in 1772. When American merchant Charles Stewart sought to reclaim James Somerset, a slave who had run away on a visit to England, the British court ruled in Somerset's favor, effectively depriving owners of the right to retain their slaves. The American colonies, which had already felt the sting of capricious laws intended to benefit England, feared the worst that might happen were the mother country to repudiate slavery abroad as at home—and they responded with revolution.

Slave Nation brings the founding of America to life through a wealth of documentation—letters, legal rulings, proclamations, and passionate oratory—all of which shaped the final doctrines hammered out by the Continental Congress. Only by agreeing to support the right to own slaves were the northern and southern colonies able to come together in the union needed to break free from England. That agreement, the Blumrosens propose, laid the foundation at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, where the prohibition of slavery north of the Ohio River began the polarization of the newborn country into North and South that would explode less than a century later in the American Civil War.

Slave Nation offers an original and unsettling look at issues fundamental to the founding of America whose repercussions are still being felt today.

Alfred Blumrosen is the Thomas A. Cowan Professor of Law at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He has served on the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and as a special attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He is the author of numerous books on job discrimination, civil rights, and affirmative action.

The late Ruth Blumrosen was an adjunct professor of law at Rutgers Law School. She assisted in the establishment of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and litigated and served as consultant on numerous cases involving employment discrimination, employee rights, sex discrimination, and job segregation.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760778777
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
01/02/2006
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.66(w) x 9.22(h) x 1.28(d)

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