Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas: Restoring the Links

Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas: Restoring the Links

by Gwendolyn Midlo Hall
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Enslaved peoples were brought to the Americas from many places in Africa, but a large majority came from relatively few ethnic groups. Drawing on a wide range of materials in four languages as well as on her lifetime study of slave groups in the New World, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall explores the persistence of African ethnic identities among the enslaved over four hundred… See more details below

Overview

Enslaved peoples were brought to the Americas from many places in Africa, but a large majority came from relatively few ethnic groups. Drawing on a wide range of materials in four languages as well as on her lifetime study of slave groups in the New World, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall explores the persistence of African ethnic identities among the enslaved over four hundred years of the Atlantic slave trade.

Hall traces the linguistic, economic, and cultural ties shared by large numbers of enslaved Africans, showing that despite the fragmentation of the diaspora many ethnic groups retained enough cohesion to communicate and to transmit elements of their shared culture. Hall concludes that recognition of the survival and persistence of African ethnic identities can fundamentally reshape how people think about the emergence of identities among enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Americas, about the ways shared identity gave rise to resistance movements, and about the elements of common African ethnic traditions that influenced regional creole cultures throughout the Americas.

Enslaved peoples were brought to the Americas from many places in Africa, but a large majority came from relatively few ethnic groups. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall traces the linguistic, economic, and cultural ties shared by large numbers of enslaved Africans, showing that despite the fragmentation of the diaspora many ethnic groups retained enough cohesion to communicate and to transmit elements of their shared culture. Hall concludes that recognizing the persistence of African ethnic identities can reshape how people think about the emergence of identities among enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Americas, about the ways shared identity gave rise to resistance movements, and about the elements of common African ethnic traditions that influenced regional creole cultures throughout the Americas.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The book's continuing return to the methodological necessity of exploring African ethnicity in the Americas with ample regard for historical context and change over time and place is necessary and important.—H-Atlantic

Important, providing a new template for critics as well as supporters, and opening up a new chapter in what is clearly a changing paradigm.—Journal of the Early Republic

[Hall's] latest attempt represents a new attempt to more clearly ascertain the influence of the enslaved Africans on the societies of the Americas.—Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

In her effort at 'restoring the links,' Hall's study encompasses four centuries of Atlantic slave trading and underscores the historical reality that continuity and change go hand in hand.—Journal of African American History

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807876862
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
11/05/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
248
Sales rank:
380,897
File size:
4 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
This is a work of major importance. Its breadth of comprehension and depth of research put the entire subject on a new empirical foundation. Gwendolyn Hall is truly a national treasure.—David Hackett Fischer, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Washington's Crossing

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >