Slavery & Reform In West Africa: Toward Emancipation In Nineteenth-Century / Edition 1

Slavery & Reform In West Africa: Toward Emancipation In Nineteenth-Century / Edition 1

by Trevor R. Getz
     
 

A series of transformations, reforms, and attempted abolitions of slavery form a core narrative of nineteenth-century coastal West Africa. As the region's role in Atlantic commercial networks underwent a gradual transition from principally that of slave exporter to producer of "legitimate goods" and dependent markets, institutions of slavery became battlegrounds in

See more details below

Overview

A series of transformations, reforms, and attempted abolitions of slavery form a core narrative of nineteenth-century coastal West Africa. As the region's role in Atlantic commercial networks underwent a gradual transition from principally that of slave exporter to producer of "legitimate goods" and dependent markets, institutions of slavery became battlegrounds in which European abolitionism, pragmatic colonialism, and indigenous agency clashed.

In Slavery and Reform in West Africa, Trevor Getz demonstrates that it was largely on the anvil of this issue that French and British policy in West Africa was forged. With distant metropoles unable to intervene in daily affairs, local European administrators, striving to balance abolitionist pressures against the resistance of politically and economically powerful local slave owners, sought ways to satisfy the latter while placating or duping the former.

The result was an alliance between colonial officials, company agents, and slave-owning elites that effectively slowed, sidetracked, or undermined serious attempts to reform slave holding. Although slavery was outlawed in both regions, in only a few isolated instances did large-scale emancipations occur. Under the surface, however, slaves used the threat of self-liberation to reach accommodations that transformed the master-slave relationship.

By comparing the strategies of colonial administrators, slave-owners, and slaves across these two regions and throughout the nineteenth century, Slavery and Reform in West Africa reveals not only the causes of the astounding success of slave owners, but also the factors that could, and in some cases did, lead to slave liberations. These findings have serious implications for the wider study of slavery and emancipation and for the history of Africa generally.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780821415214
Publisher:
Ohio University Press
Publication date:
04/20/2004
Series:
Western African Studies Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.63(d)

Table of Contents

List of maps
List of tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1The era of the Atlantic slave trade1
2The crisis of abolition, legitimate trade, and the adaptation of slavery28
3Rules and reality : anteproclamation slavery and society on the Gold Coast54
4The grand experiment : emancipation in Senegal colony69
5Pragmatic policies in periods of expansion85
6Slaves and masters in the postproclamation Gold Coast111
7Slaves and masters in French-administered Senegal137
8Toward the eradication of the overland slave trade?160
Conclusions : African continuity, adaptation, and transformation180
Notes193
Bibliography235
Index251

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >