Slavery and the Meetinghouse: The Quakers and the Abolitionist Dilemma, 1820-1865

Slavery and the Meetinghouse: The Quakers and the Abolitionist Dilemma, 1820-1865

by Ryan P. Jordan
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0253348609

ISBN-13: 9780253348609

Pub. Date: 04/28/2006

Publisher: Indiana University Press

Ryan P. Jordan explores the limits of religious dissent in antebellum America, and reminds us of the difficulties facing reformers who tried peacefully to end slavery. In the years before the Civil War, the Society of Friends opposed the abolitionist campaign for an immediate end to slavery and considered abolitionists within the church as heterodox radicals

Overview

Ryan P. Jordan explores the limits of religious dissent in antebellum America, and reminds us of the difficulties facing reformers who tried peacefully to end slavery. In the years before the Civil War, the Society of Friends opposed the abolitionist campaign for an immediate end to slavery and considered abolitionists within the church as heterodox radicals seeking to destroy civil and religious liberty. In response, many Quaker abolitionists began to build "comeouter" institutions where social and legal inequalities could be freely discussed, and where church members could fuse religious worship with social activism. The conflict between the Quakers and the Abolitionists highlights the dilemma of liberal religion within a slaveholding republic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253348609
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
04/28/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
200
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.79(d)

Table of Contents

Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments

Introduction: Quakers, Slavery, and the "Peaceable Kingdom"
1. Quaker Gradualists and the Challenge of Abolitionism
2. Slavery, Religious Liberty, and the "Political" Abolitionism of the Indiana Anti-Slavery Friends
3. Friends and the "Children of Africa": Quaker Abolitionists Confront the Negro Pew
4. "Progressive" Friends and the Government of God
5. Quaker Pacifism and Civil Disobedience in the Antebellum Period
Conclusion: "Fighting Quakers," Abolitionists, and the Civil War

Notes
Bibliography
Index

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