Slaves, Freedmen and Indentured Laborers in Colonial Mauritius

Slaves, Freedmen and Indentured Laborers in Colonial Mauritius

by Richard B. Allen
     
 

ISBN-10: 052164125X

ISBN-13: 9780521641258

Pub. Date: 01/28/2012

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This social and economic history of the island of Mauritius, from French colonization in 1721 to the beginnings of modern political life in the mid-1930s, emphasizes the importance of domestic capital formation, particularly in the sugar industry. Describing changing relationships among different elements in the society, slave, free and maroon, and East Indian

Overview

This social and economic history of the island of Mauritius, from French colonization in 1721 to the beginnings of modern political life in the mid-1930s, emphasizes the importance of domestic capital formation, particularly in the sugar industry. Describing changing relationships among different elements in the society, slave, free and maroon, and East Indian indentured populations, it shows how these were conditioned by demographic changes, world markets, and local institutions. It brings the Mauritian case to the attention of scholars engaged in the comparative study of slavery and plantation systems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521641258
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/28/2012
Series:
African Studies Series , #99
Pages:
241
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.67(d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Creating a garden of sugar: land, labor and capital, 1721–1936; Part I. Labor and Labor Relations: 3. A state of continual disquietude and hostility: maroonage and slave labor, 1721–1835; 4. Indentured labor and the legacy of maroonage: illegal absence; desertion, and vagrancy, 1835–1900; Part II. Land and the Mobilization of Domestic Capital: 5. Becoming an appropriated people: the rise of the free population of color, 1729–1830; 6. The general desire to possess land: ex-apprentices and the post-emancipation era, 1839–51; 7. The regenerators of agricultural prosperity: Indian immigrants and their descendants, 1834–1936; 8. Conclusion.

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