Sleep, Big Bear, Sleep!

Sleep, Big Bear, Sleep!

by Maureen Wright, Will Hillenbrand
     
 

It’s time for Big Bear to hibernate, so Old Man Winter keeps telling him: “Sleep, Big Bear, sleep.” But Big Bear doesn’t hear very well. He thinks Old Man Winter has told him to drive a jeep, to sweep, and to leap. Big Bear just can’t seem to hear what Old Man Winter is saying. Finally, Old Man Winter finds a noisy way to get Big

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Overview

It’s time for Big Bear to hibernate, so Old Man Winter keeps telling him: “Sleep, Big Bear, sleep.” But Big Bear doesn’t hear very well. He thinks Old Man Winter has told him to drive a jeep, to sweep, and to leap. Big Bear just can’t seem to hear what Old Man Winter is saying. Finally, Old Man Winter finds a noisy way to get Big Bear’s attention. Cozy illustrations rendered in pencil and mixed media by Will Hillenbrand bring this bedtime story to a fitting conclusion.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
04/27/2015
Something's lost in translation—to funny effect—in this picture book about a hard-of-hearing bear's bungled preparations for a long winter's nap. As autumn rolls along, Old Man Winter, a whiskery face in the clouds, warns his friend, Big Bear, of the approaching cold weather. But Big Bear can't quite make out Old Man Winter's recurring suggestion—"Sleep, Big Bear, sleep"—and instead hears all manner of like-sounding phrases such as "Drive a jeep, Big Bear, drive a jeep," or "Climb a mountain steep, Big Bear, steep." Each misguided effort leaves Big Bear more and more tired, until Old Man Winter finally makes himself heard. First-time author Wright creates an appealing blend of silliness and read-aloud exuberance in her rhyming text. Hillenbrand's (Louie!) brown bear, accompanied by an energetic rabbit sidekick, has a friendly, expressive face and attacks his tasks with verve, despite his growing exhaustion. The rolling countryside, glowing in seasonal moonlight, or dotted with fine white snowflakes and crisp evergreens against a wintry gray sky, will have readers longing for a cup of hot cocoa. Ages 4—8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
Maureen Wright's first offering for young children does a wonderful job of playing with language as Big Bear, who "didn't hear very well" keeps misunderstanding Old Man Winter's whispered admonition "Sleep, Big Bear, Sleep." Preschooler's will be delighted as sleepy bear drives a jeep, sweeps, leaps, dives deep, and climbs up steep until Old Man's yelling allows him gratefully to head for his winter hibernation. The text is highly patterned and melodic. The text is complemented by Hillenbrand's use of a late autumn palette to depict the valleys and mountains where Bear lives. The illustrations offer plenty of detail for a preschooler in Mama's lap or listening to a classroom read-aloud to explore. Not only can this book be used to develop phonemic awareness, it could be used to do a comparison/contrast activity with the popular "Bear Snores On" series done by the team of Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—It is getting cold and time for hibernation, so Old Man Winter says, "'Sleep, Big Bear, sleep.'/But Big Bear didn't hear very well…." Instead he mishears Old Man Winter and, in attempting to follow his directions, drives a jeep, sweeps a house, climbs a steep mountain, etc. Ultimately, Old Man Winter yells loudly enough for Big Bear to understand him, and the bear heads off to his den for a much-deserved rest. The text moves at a steady clip, and the refrain will encourage child participation. The fact that "sleep" seems unlikely to be mistaken for "climb a mountain steep" or "drive a jeep" probably won't bother the intended audience. The story reads aloud well, and the limited text and oversize illustrations will be effective in storytime. The artwork is the real star here, though. Hillenbrand imbues his characters with motion and personality; their growing exhaustion is evident in their drooping eyes, ears, and body, and their startled expressions when Old Man Winter yells could not be clearer. An above-average addition for libraries looking for more bear, hibernation, or winter stories to freshen up interactive storytimes.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Big Bear is hard of hearing, so each time Old Man Winter tries to tell him to "Sleep, Big Bear, sleep," he hears something different, from "drive a jeep" to "leap" to "dive deep." Yawning mightily all the while, Big Bear tries to follow instructions till Old Man Winter bellows in exasperation to "GO TO BED." Hillenbrand's snowy landscape gets darker and darker as poor Big Bear does as he's told, accompanied by a brown hare. Perspectives and even orientations vary to keep the visual interest high even as the repetitive tale makes its way through goof after goof. Wright's text makes for a terrific read-aloud, with couplets and triplets lining up easily on the tongue and a catchy refrain kids will join in on. Bear-gets-ready-for-winter books abound, but this one's worth adding to any collection. (Picture book. 3-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761455608
Publisher:
Amazon Childrens Publishing
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
554,821
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD790L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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