Sleep Like a Tiger [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this magical bedtime story, the lyrical narrative echoes a Runaway Bunny–like cadence: “Does everything in the world go to sleep?” the little girl asks. In sincere and imaginative dialogue between a not-at-all sleepy child and understanding parents, the little girl decides “in a cocoon of sheets, a nest of blankets,” she is ready to sleep, warm and strong, just like a tiger. The Caldecott Honor artist Pamela Zagarenski’s rich, luminous mixed-media paintings effervesce with odd, charming details that nonsleepy ...

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Sleep Like a Tiger

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Overview

In this magical bedtime story, the lyrical narrative echoes a Runaway Bunny–like cadence: “Does everything in the world go to sleep?” the little girl asks. In sincere and imaginative dialogue between a not-at-all sleepy child and understanding parents, the little girl decides “in a cocoon of sheets, a nest of blankets,” she is ready to sleep, warm and strong, just like a tiger. The Caldecott Honor artist Pamela Zagarenski’s rich, luminous mixed-media paintings effervesce with odd, charming details that nonsleepy children could examine for hours. A rare gem.

A 2013 Caldecott Honor Book

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
Logue's text is reassuring and rhythmic, but it is the fine detail and plush atmospherics of Zagarenski's layered multimedia illustrations that make the book shine.
—Pamela Paul
The Washington Post
Set against Caldecott Honor medalist Pamela Zagarenski's gloriously soft-toned dreamscapes of moons and stars and toys and towns, the lyrical text magnifies the magical mood.
—Kristi Elle Jemtegaard
Publishers Weekly
“I’m not tired,” says a small girl in a red dress and a crown. “I’m just not sleepy.” Her affectionate parents—who also wear crowns—aren’t fazed. “They nodded their heads and said she didn’t have to go to sleep. But she had to put her pajamas on.” The three talk about the different ways animals sleep, taking their cue from family pets and the girl’s stuffed animals. Zagarenski’s gently surreal jewel-box paintings chart the movement of the girl’s imagination as she considers bears (“mighty sleepers,” her parents call them), snails (“They curl up like a cinnamon roll”), and tigers. “When he’s not hunting, he finds some shade, closes his eyes, and sleeps. That way he stays strong,” she says. It’s this image that holds the greatest promise of safety for the girl; as she drifts off, she imagines herself curled in the curve of the tiger’s tail, embracing a stuffed tiger as she sleeps. Zagarenski’s paintings take Logue’s story to places marvelously distant in thought and time; each spread holds treasures to find even after several readings. Ages 4–8. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
A little girl does not want to go to sleep; she is not tired. Her parents tell her just to put on her pajamas. Since she is still wide awake, they ask her to wash her face and brush her teeth. Feeling good and loving her bed, she finally climbs in. "Does everything in the world go to sleep?" she asks them. They assure her that they do, citing their dog and cat. When she asks about bats that do not sleep at night, she is told how they sleep during the day. Her parents also describe how all the other creatures she asks about, from whales to bears, go to sleep. Noting how the tiger in the jungle sleeps a lot, she claims that she is still not sleepy, so they tell her she can stay awake all night. But in her bed, she imitates each of the creatures she has asked about until, like the tiger, she falls asleep. The simple bedtime story has far from simple visuals. On the front end pages is a huge yellow disc and a toy-like train carrying a tiger; on the back it is nighttime and the train and tiger are passing the house where the girl is finally asleep. Zagarenski combines mixed media paintings on wood with computer illustration to produce partly naturalistic and partly stylized dream-like illustrations that require deep examination beyond the brief text. What do the crowns and the banners symbolize? Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
The stages and script preceding this child's passage into dreamland are so appealing they will surely inspire imitation. When the protagonist announces that she is not sleepy, her wise parents counter that they are not requiring sleep, only pajama-wearing, face-washing and teeth-brushing. She then feels so good that "she loved / …stretching her toes / down under the crisp sheets, / lying as still as an otter / floating in a stream." Logue's words lull and caress as parents and child converse about how and where animals sleep. (Many appeared on earlier pages as toys.) Alone, the youngster replays each scene, inserting herself; the cozy images help her relax. Zagarenski's exquisite compositions are rendered digitally and in mixed-media on wood, offering much to ponder. The paintings are luminous, from the child's starry pajamas to the glowing whale supporting her sleep journey. Transparent layers, blending patterns, complex textures and wheeled objects add to the sense of gentle movement. The tiger, both the beloved cloth version and the real deal, is featured prominently; it is the child who contributes this example, narrating the connection between strength and rest. When sleep arrives, the stuffed animal is cradled in her arms; she leans against the jungle beast, and he clings to her doll. This deeply satisfying story offers what all children crave when letting go--security and a trusted companion. (Picture book. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547641034
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/23/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 83,903
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Caldecott Honor Medalist Pamela Zagarenski is a brilliant painter of many worlds. As well as illustrating picture books, she creates sculptures and large paintings, which can be viewed at an art gallery in Mystic, Connecticut. She divides her time between Stonington, Connecticut, and her house on Prince Edward Island. Visit www.pzagarenski.com.

Award-winning author Mary Logue has written more than twenty books for children. She lives on the Mississippi with writer Pete Hautman. This is her first book with Houghton Mifflin.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    Highly Recommend

    This story of a little girl who isn't sleepy will resonate with young children and their parents. It is beautifully illustrated, and the relationship between the parents and the little girl is loving and gentle. There are many interesting things to find among the drawings to keep children interested and engaged. This is sure to become a classic!

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  • Posted September 11, 2013

    This fabulous book transports the readers into a magical, dreamy

    This fabulous book transports the readers into a magical, dreamy world and induces sleep.  A little girl is not tired and cannot sleep.  Her parents don't scold her or reprimand her but encourage her to put on her pajamas, wash her face, brush her teeth and get ready for bed.  The little girl declares she is still not sleepy.  She obeys her parents wishes and feels good "that she is loved/stretching her toes/ down under the crisp sheets,/ lying as still as an otter/floating in a stream."  She asks if everything in the world sleeps which leads her parents to patiently describe how different animals in different places sleep:  bats  hang upside down, whales float along, bears hibernate and finally tigers curl up like a cat and doze off.   After conversing with her parents about the habits of these animals,  the little girl finally succumbs to her weariness and falls fast asleep just like the strong tiger.




    There is a lot of conversation at the beginning of the book and once the little girl is in bed the language becomes more poetic and dream-like, filled with imagery.  The words of the text are warm, cozy and invite you in to share that mood.




    The artwork is stunning and beautifully executed.  The girl's toys are vintage reflecting the animals discussed in the text.  An otter floats on the girl's blue quilt as if on the ocean.  There is a recurring teapot and cup, and crowns for the whole family to wear - very surreal.  The illustrations are mixed media painting on wood and computer illustrations, magical indeed, absolutely gorgeous.  This is a perfect read-aloud for bedtime encouraging you to nestle down, get cozy and everyone (including the reader) to go to sleep.

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