Sleep Tight, Little Mouse

Sleep Tight, Little Mouse

by Mary Morgan
     
 

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As a little mouse tosses and turns in his bed of dried grasses, he imagines that other animals must surely have better sleeping arrangements. A bird's nest, a kangaroo's pouch, a polar bear's den -- they all sound so cozy... at first. But a patient mother mouse helps her little one see why home is best for him.

This mother and child's loving banter suggests a game

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Overview

As a little mouse tosses and turns in his bed of dried grasses, he imagines that other animals must surely have better sleeping arrangements. A bird's nest, a kangaroo's pouch, a polar bear's den -- they all sound so cozy... at first. But a patient mother mouse helps her little one see why home is best for him.

This mother and child's loving banter suggests a game that parents and toddlers will quickly add to their own bedtime routines -- ensuring sweet dreams for all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Morgan (the Rosie mouse books) makes a virtue of familiarity in this cozy, handily undersize bedtime book. Little Mouse usually enjoys being tucked up in his bed, but now he wants a change. Perhaps he could sleep in a nest, like a bird? His mother encourages his fantasy, then refers to his waking up to a "delicious worm breakfast." Naturally, worms do not appeal to Little Mouse, who next proposes joining a "pile of puppies" (Mama disarms him by telling him how handsome he will look in a collar). Various other animal resting places come up for discussion before Little Mouse declares himself "too sleepy to think anymore" and falls asleep, in his "very own soft, grassy bed." Morgan supplies full-bleed watercolors of the diminutive hero, who is anthropomorphized enough to have a childlike expressiveness (and to clutch his own tiny mouse doll), in each scenario he imagines (e.g., nestled among the hatchlings under a mother bird's wing). Smaller pictures show Mama's wet-blanket version (the mother bird proffers a worm to downcast Little Mouse), and spot illustrations depict Mama and Little Mouse in conversation. The story line offers sweetness and constancy in place of surprises; kids will enjoy its reassuring predictability as well as the tender, gentle humor of the art. Ages 3-6. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-One night before bedtime, Little Mouse just cannot relax, so he tells his mother that he would like to try sleeping the way other baby animals do: maybe in a bird's nest, or with puppies, or in a kangaroo's pouch, etc. As she subtly discourages his ideas, he realizes that he does not like worms or wearing a collar, and would definitely not appreciate being bounced around. But mostly, he would miss his mother, if he stayed all winter with the polar bears. Large illustrations across spreads beautifully depict Little Mouse's ideas for his new sleeping arrangements: under a full moon that lights up the birds' midnight-blue sky, surrounded by puppies in warm hues of brown and gold, pressed against winter white polar bears, his mouse doll ever in tow. Little ones will enjoy hearing this story as a gentle nap or bedtime tale or as a delightful introduction to animals and their babies.-Wanda Meyers-Hines, Ridgecrest Elementary School, Huntsville, AL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this diminutive charmer, a restless mouseling tells his mama that he’d rather sleep in a bird’s nest, in a pile of puppies, a kangaroo’s pouch, with bats in a cave, or with a polar bear mama. His own mama, unperturbed, offers canny objections--" ‘Yummy,’ said Mama, ‘a delicious worm breakfast’ "--for a while, but soon the little mouse is coming up with difficulties on his own, and eventually reaches the foreordained conclusion that his own grassy bed is best. Morgan gives the mouse child a tiny plush mouse toy, but he himself looks round and plush, as does his mama, and most of the gently smiling creatures his imagination conjures up. Aside from the misleading suggestion that polar bears hibernate, this cozy alternative to Kate Banks’s Spider Spider (1996), Margaret Wise Brown’s Runaway Bunny (1942), and similar parent/child dialogues is a good choice for bedtime sharing with any pajama-clad mousekin. (Picture book. 4-6)
From the Publisher
"This cozy alternative to Kate Banks’s Spider Spider (1996), Margaret Wise Brown’s Runaway Bunny (1942), and similar parent/child dialogues is a good choice for bedtime sharing with any pajama-clad mousekin." —Kirkus

"Little ones will enjoy hearing this story as a gentle nap or bedtime tale or as a delightful introduction to animals and their babies." —School Library Journal

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375823084
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
05/13/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 7.06(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Morgan studied art in Mexico and has illustrated more than 40 books for children. She was born in Chicago, grew up in Kansas City, and now lives in Paris, France.

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