Sleeping with One Eye Open: Women Writers and the Art of Survival

Overview

How do women writers cope with changes and juggle the demands in their already full lives to make time for their lives as artists? In this anthology, noted female novelists, journalists, essayists, poets, and nonfiction writers address the old and new challenges of "doing it all" that face women writers as the twenty-first century approaches. With eloquence, sensitivity, and more than a touch of wry humor, Sleeping with One Eye Open relates positive stories from women who lead effective lives as artists, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

How do women writers cope with changes and juggle the demands in their already full lives to make time for their lives as artists? In this anthology, noted female novelists, journalists, essayists, poets, and nonfiction writers address the old and new challenges of "doing it all" that face women writers as the twenty-first century approaches. With eloquence, sensitivity, and more than a touch of wry humor, Sleeping with One Eye Open relates positive stories from women who lead effective lives as artists, emphasizing how sources of inspiration, discipline, resourcefulness, and determination help them succeed despite the obstacle of "no time."

The title essay, Judith Ortiz Cofer's "The Woman Who Slept with One Eye Open," defines the collection. Cofer relates the ways in which a mythological story from her Puerto Rican culture gave her confidence and courage, encouraging her creative success and emphasizing the rewards of "women's power" and personal strength. Denise Levertov's "The Vital Necessity" urges poets to make time for daydreams—essential, empowering creative food. Tillie Olsen offers a frank discussion of the pressures of work and expectations that too often sap creative energy. Tess Gallagher connects her mother's creative gardening with her own inspiration as a poet and the need for growth in her writing. Marilyn Kallet's interview with Lucille Clifton relates the personal strength that helped Clifton raise six children and publish her first book at the same time. This affirming collection offers a wealth of writing advice, given through honest accounts of perseverance and accomplishment.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A terrific collection of essays that women writers should buy. This is a book of our time. . . . An excellent tool for our turn-of-the-century writing toolbox."—Frances Payne Adler

"What I find particulary satisfying about Sleeping With One Eye Open is the way the different women's voices and dialects and souls sing together in a powerful symphony of language. This anthology should be read by both women beginning to write as well as by those who are more established and want to feel connected to a larger community."—Sue William Silverman, author of Because I Remember Terror, Father, I Remember You, winner of AWP Award for Creative Nonfiction

"Well-written . . . All the essays will be inspiring to both active and would-be artists."—Booklist

"Presents a wellspring of inspiration and encouragement for women who wrestle with satisfying their gift of word."—ForeWord

Library Journal
This is a collection of essays dealing with the challenges faced by writers, particularly women writers. While essayists and fiction writers are included, poets are emphasized. Most of the pieces were specifically written for this compilation, though some are revised or updated versions of earlier work. The editors, poets themselves, have divided the pieces into four sections. The first deals with sources of inspiration, the second with the lack of writing time, the third with handling obstacles that may interfere with writing (be they physical or emotional), and the last with family situations and their influence on output. On the whole, the essays are well written, though several in the first section ramble and could have used stronger editing. The sectional divisions seem a bit forced, as each piece stands on its own, without categorization. Best read piecemeal, all the essays will be inspiring to both active and would-be artists. Recommended for creative writing and women's studies programs.--Gina Kaiser, Univ. of the Sciences in Philadelphia Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780820321530
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/1999
  • Pages: 248

Meet the Author

Marilyn Kallet is a professor of English and director of the creative writing program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is the author of eight books, including How to Get Heat without Fire, and coeditor of Worlds in Our Words: Contemporary American Women Writers. Judith Ortiz Cofer is The Regents' and Franklin Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Georgia. She is also the author of The Latin Deli (Georgia) and The Line of the Sun (Georgia).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
I Waking Myths, Waking Words
The Woman Who Slept with One Eye Open: Notes on Being a Writer 3
Poetry Began Me 13
Inking In the Myth 21
Listening for the Singing Goose 29
Manipulations in the Darkroom 35
Fire, Wax, Smoke 44
Five A.M.: Writing as Ritual 50
2 Writing in No-Time
Writing in No-Time 55
Excerpts from a Talk by Tillie Olsen 64
Doing What You Will Do: An Interview with Lucille Clifton by Marilyn Kallet 80
Hedging Bets on Motherhood 86
The Artist as Single Mother 94
Writing Between Dreams 100
Writing Fellini 103
Walking into Poetry 110
The Prime Necessity 116
3 Sounds of Hazard and Survival
Writing the Impossible 121
The Elephant in My Living Room: Depression and the Writing Life 126
Selective Listening and Resistance: A Writer's Capacity to Thrive 130
The Glass Cage 135
Sounds of Hazard and Survival 145
Finding the Groove 151
4 The Crucible of Family
The Writer in the Family 155
The Pure Place 167
Why Write? 184
Earning Virginia Woolf's Room 189
Rescue from Within: Do You Wish to Save? 200
My Father's Legacy, or Why I Write 209
Contributors 215
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)