Sleepy Boy
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Sleepy Boy

3.0 6
by Polly Kanevsky, Stephanie Anderson
     
 

During the day, the boy has been to the zoo where he has seen a lion and her cub. As nighttime falls, the boy and his father share a book. It's the boy's bedtime, but the boy is not sleepy. He is still with the lions. Sleepy Boy is a lovely hymn from a new author — a hymn to day and to night, to awake and to asleep, to mother and child, to father and

Overview

During the day, the boy has been to the zoo where he has seen a lion and her cub. As nighttime falls, the boy and his father share a book. It's the boy's bedtime, but the boy is not sleepy. He is still with the lions. Sleepy Boy is a lovely hymn from a new author — a hymn to day and to night, to awake and to asleep, to mother and child, to father and son.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"There is art and craft, both verbal and visual, in this very quiet bedtime story. Unusual and captivating."
Kirkus Review, starred reveiw

"With its exquisite artwork and mesmerizing text, this bedtime book is simply enchanting."
Publisher's Weekly, starred review

Publishers Weekly
With its exquisite artwork and mesmerizing text, this bedtime book is simply enchanting. Anderson's (Weaving the Rainbow) watercolor and charcoal paintings bring to mind Mary Cassatt's portraits of children, but they are suffused with a remarkable golden Renaissance light. "Here is a boy who will not sleep," begins the book, as readers see just the boy's toes; a turn of the page puts the view in context-a restless boy with his feet propped on the headboard of his bed as he reflects on his day watching lions at the zoo. Another spread reveals only the boy's wide-open eyes, with the reflected image of a lion cub, a recurring visual motif. First-time author Kanevsky describes the fidgety boy's thoughts with sensitivity and minute detail as he feels "his eyelashes/ making tiny movements,/ fanning the air under his eyes." Anderson blurs the distinction between the boy's real and imagined worlds with a palette that echoes the lions' fur and with images of the cub trying to climb onto the boy's bed or looking out the window. Finally, the boy hears the cub's low purr and they fall asleep together. The father's tenderness as he caresses his son's head on the book's startling cover painting is in harmony with the alert watchfulness of the lioness as she mothers her cub. Ages 2-5. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-A child has trouble falling asleep. Although his father lies beside him, holding him and calming him, all of the boy's senses are alert. He sees his own nose-"blurry and giant"-and the "dusty, golden color" of a nearby lamp. He hears his mother in the bathroom singing and hums along, "-so low, he thinks it sounds like breathing." He feels his father's "scratchy chin" and "soft, papery" shirt. The text progresses quietly, lyrically in a tone that is sensuous, soothing, and thoughtful. Throughout the narrative, the boy also thinks about the lions he saw during a visit to the zoo earlier that day, remembering how a cub was washed and fed. His self-association with the animal is wonderfully expressed in the watercolor-and-charcoal artwork, which presents the two of them as counterparts. The evocative, photo-quality paintings are luscious and sophisticated. A soft, tawny glow envelopes each picture, be it of the child, sweetly curled in his father's arms, or the cub, roaming the room, gazing out the window, or playing with the boy's shoes. Readers see the feline reflected in the youngster's eye, or perched beside the mother's sink, reaching out to play with the running water. This beautiful book is a stellar collaboration with a fully sustained vision; it will move, enrich, and challenge children.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
There is art and craft, both verbal and visual, in this very quiet bedtime story. "Here is a boy who will not sleep," the text begins, a boy who has spent the day at the zoo watching a lioness and her cub. At home, his father is doing all he can to get the boy to sleep: lying down next to him; making soothing sounds and gestures; suggesting the old trick of closing one eye, then the other. The boy, however, is full of the sights of the day, when he snuggles up to his dad's chest. The interplay between boy and dad is lovely and true, as their competing but tandem thoughts tangle and slow. Anderson has taken Kanevsky's marvelous words and made a gorgeous visual metaphor for them. In the gold-to-dusk, beautifully modeled watercolor-and-charcoal forms of father and son, bedroom and window, she places on each page the lion cub and its mother in the same household setting. Readers see what the boy sees in his mind's eye. The illustrations, often tight close-ups at extreme angles, nevertheless capture geometry softened by twilight and a shadowed, shared tenderness between both parent/child dyads. Unusual and captivating. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689867354
Publisher:
Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books
Publication date:
05/28/2006
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,210,332
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Polly Kanevsky lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, Chris, and their two cats. She is a graphic designer. This is her first book.

Stephanie Anderson lives in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Her first picture book was Weaving the Rainbow, by George Ella Lyon, in which her art was praised by Kirkus Reviews as "exquisite."

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Sleepy Boy 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautiful
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
As a mother of two boys who loves animals I loved how the author weaved both into her goodnight story. SLEEPY BOY is about a little boy who spent the day at the zoo, however, it is night now and he is supposed to be going to sleep. But he can't. He keeps remembering the lionness and her cub he saw at the zoo, and how that animal mother took care of her cub. The author uses all the senses to describe what the little boy is experiencing. I liked the author's choice of words. I also liked the beautiful, soft illustrations. Dad's may enjoy reading this book to their sons, because the story starts off with Dad trying to put his little boy to bed. Mom is in the story too. I think little girls would enjoy this book despite the story being about a little boy. The theme is also something both boys and girls should be able to relate to. Sometimes it is difficult to fall asleep, especially after an exciting day. Kids can't stop thinking about all the fun things they did. Sometimes as an adult I feel this way too. I can remember when my kids were young, lying beside them, like the dad in the story, and pretending to sleep, to try and get my kids to sleep. SLEEPY BOY is a gentle, sweet, calming book. I liked it. A. D. Tarbox, author of ALREADY ASLEEP