Sleepy Pendoodle

Sleepy Pendoodle

by Julie Vivas
     
 
This lively and rhythmic read-aloud about a new puppy will delight young pet lovers.

Pendoodle the puppy still hasn’t opened his eyes, much to his young owner’s frustration. Luckily, Uncle Hughie knows just what to do—but can the little girl remember his instructions to wake up her sleepy pup? With engaging illustrations of multicultural

Overview

This lively and rhythmic read-aloud about a new puppy will delight young pet lovers.

Pendoodle the puppy still hasn’t opened his eyes, much to his young owner’s frustration. Luckily, Uncle Hughie knows just what to do—but can the little girl remember his instructions to wake up her sleepy pup? With engaging illustrations of multicultural characters by Julie Vivas, Malachy Doyle’s story warmly portrays a child’s experience with a new pet. The cadence of nonsense words in SLEEPY PENDOODLE contributes to a rollicking read-aloud.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This winning volume captures all the excitement and mystery of a child bonding with a new pup. After the girl narrator discovers a newborn stray pooch in an alley, she gives him some TLC. In episodic illustrations silhouetted against generous white space, Vivas (I Went Walking) shows the multi-pigtailed girl sudsing him up in a bath, caressing him and feeding him with a bottle. But why won't the puppy open his eyes? The girl then turns to her uncle for advice, who tells her, "You stroke him on the back and say, `Open your eyes, Sleepy Pendoodle! Open your eyes, you pup!' " She tries hard to remember her uncle's words as she runs home, but just can't get it right. Did he say "Pendoodle"? "Pendiddle"? "Pendaddle"? Or even possibly "Sloppy Popwaddle"? As the heroine wracks her brain, she strokes the toast-colored puppy gently, and just when she remembers what to say and pronounces the magic words, "He opened his eyes wide!" Doyle's (The Bold Boy) word play heightens the exuberant fun, the story brims with energy, and Vivas portrays a heroine with warmth and gusto to spare. Ages 3-6. (Jan.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
This winning volume captures all the excitement and mystery of a child bonding with a new pup. After the girl narrator discovers a newborn stray pooch in an alley, she gives him some TLC. In episodic illustrations silhouetted against generous white space, Vivas (I Went Walking) shows the multi-pigtailed girl sudsing him up in a bath, caressing him and feeding him with a bottle. But why won't the puppy open his eyes? The girl then turns to her uncle for advice, who tells her, "You stroke him on the back and say, `Open your eyes, Sleepy Pendoodle! Open your eyes, you pup!' " She tries hard to remember her uncle's words as she runs home, but just can't get it right. Did he say "Pendoodle"? "Pendiddle"? "Pendaddle"? Or even possibly "Sloppy Popwaddle"? As the heroine wracks her brain, she strokes the toast-colored puppy gently, and just when she remembers what to say and pronounces the magic words, "He opened his eyes wide!" Doyle's (The Bold Boy) word play heightens the exuberant fun, the story brims with energy, and Vivas portrays a heroine with warmth and gusto to spare. Ages 3-6. (Jan.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
What's a girl to do when she finds an adorable newborn pup who won't open his eyes no matter what she does to encourage him? The pigtailed teller of this tale runs to Uncle Hughie for advice, which includes saying the magical words, "Sleepy Pendoodle." In her excitement, she gets them tangled and the pup remains comically comatose until his new mistress remembers the right incantation. By this time, most preschoolers will be delighted to see the pup finally open his eyes wide and come to exuberant life. At the end we see him grown to a handsome big red dog—and it's not Clifford. Author Malachy Doyle, who lives by the Irish Sea, says he found inspiration in an Irish folktale¾his words skip with a lilt that should make for enjoyable listening and participation. Australia's Julie Vivas, illustrator of several of Mem Fox's acclaimed books, has created vibrant and charming characters using warm red-browns highlighted by the little girl's Irish green dress and the bright endpapers. 2002, Candlewick, $12.99. Ages 3 to 6. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K-When the young heroine of this story finds an abandoned puppy so tiny that his eyes are shut tight, her Uncle Hughie recommends that she scrub her hands, put the dog on her knee, stroke him and repeat, "Open your eyes, Sleepy Pendoodle! Open your eyes, you pup!" By the time she rushes home, she has the sequence all jumbled but after many permutations she achieves success and, just as her uncle predicted, the puppy opens his eyes, frolics around her and, by the last page, grows up to be a big red dog. Although the rather rough handling of so young an animal is discomforting, this story is not without its charm and the fat, floppy, and fluffy pup and the spunky, determined protagonist have real personality. The straightforward story line is leavened by playful language and silly endearments and by Vivas's typically exuberant and loose-limbed characters. The expanses of white in the watercolor-and-pencil illustrations reinforce the simplicity of the text and provide effective contrast to the exaggerated poses of the girl and the dog. An engaging addition to the plethora of puppy tales and pure pleasure to read aloud.-Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Chock full of warm sentiment and playful language, this charmer will draw smiles from even the most stonehearted. A child finds an abandoned puppy, so new that its eyes aren't yet open. When she asks her uncle what to do, he advises her to stroke it and say, "Open your eyes, Sleepy Pendoodle." Those instructions get transmogrified, thanks to several distractions on the way home, but after several increasingly silly tries ("Open your eyes, Sloppy Popwaddle! Open your eyes, you pup!"), she's successful at last-"And now," she concludes happily, "he's a big red dog." Placed on the pages with almost no background detail, Vivas's figures dance about each other, the spiky-haired child and her fuzzy, golden pup both pictures of happy exuberance. Parents will be irresistibly tempted to share this with their own Peepy Splendiddles-er, Penduddles. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763615611
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.75(w) x 9.88(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Malachy Doyle grew up in Northern Ireland and now lives in Wales. He has worked in advertising and has taught secondary school. Now a full-time writer of children’s books, he is also the author of JODY'S BEANS, illustrated by Judith Allibone.

Julie Vivas was born in Adelaide, South Australia, and studied interior design at the National Art School in Sydney. She is the illustrator of THE NATIVITY and I WENT WALKING by Sue Williams, and POSSUM MAGIC and WILFRED GORDON MCDONALD PARTRIDGE by Mem Fox. She says, "The most exciting stage of the process of making a picture book is in the first rough drawings of the characters—seeing all the possibilities in those drawings is really thrilling."

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