Slither McCreep and His Brother, Joe

Slither McCreep and His Brother, Joe

by Tony Johnston, Victoria Chess
     
 

Sibling rivalry exists even between snakes, and Slither and Joe McCreep are no exceptions. “Some of the pictures-whether of the mother entangled on the telephone or of brother Joe leering at his favorite rock group, Bal Boa and the Vindow Vipers, hissing ‘Scales, Part II’ on the TV-are a psychedelic delight.” -Booklist
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Overview

Sibling rivalry exists even between snakes, and Slither and Joe McCreep are no exceptions. “Some of the pictures-whether of the mother entangled on the telephone or of brother Joe leering at his favorite rock group, Bal Boa and the Vindow Vipers, hissing ‘Scales, Part II’ on the TV-are a psychedelic delight.” -Booklist

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Angered by his brother's selfishness, Slither sneaks into Joe's room and wrecks his favorite toys; both brothers' subsequent remorse leads to an improved relationship. Such events could make for another predictable and preachy tale of sibling rivalry--but in this case the brothers are snakes, a twist that opens the way to reams of comic details that set this apart from other books on the theme. Perhaps because of the popular conception of snakes, however, the book evinces a certain unpleasant edge--the siblings' behavior is often more nasty than funny, and mother's almost total lack of intervention seems odd. Still, an infectious silliness permeates both text and art. In one particularly droll scene Joe watches his favorite rock group--Bal Boa and the Vindow Vipers--on TV, himself turbaned, sheiklike, in a purple sweater he has refused to let Slither borrow because he is ``wearing'' it. Between Johnston's peppy dialogue and Chess's vibrant visuals, reminders about sharing and respecting another's property are enjoyably imparted. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-- Despite being snakes, Slither and Joe have the usual sibling problem--sharing doesn't come naturally. First Joe bans Slither from his room; then he hogs the beach ball, the rat robots, and the purple sweater. Their mother's advice is for Slither to ignore Joe, and to ``go squeeze something'' to make himself feel better. Slither sneaks into Joe's room and squeezes his toys into unrecognizable shards and blobs. Upon reflection, though, he realizes that his actions haven't made him happier, and he breaks into his piggy bank to replace the damaged goods. Friends again, they plan what to buy, and dissolve into a ``hissy-fit--of giggles.'' The lesson is obvious, but not heavy-handed; the snake-characters provide ample opportunity for humor, and puns abound. Chess's trademark golfball eyes and toothy grins are as effective on snake faces as they are on humans, and the forked tongues add another goofy dimension. Another zany book on sharing is Daniel Pinkwater's Doodle Flute (Macmillan, 1991); try Mr. Floop's Lunch (Orchard, 1990) by Matt Novak for a more altruistic approach. --Lucy Young Clem, Evansville Vanderburgh County Public Library, IN

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152013875
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/04/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.03(w) x 10.04(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
330L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

TONY JOHNSTON’s numerous books for children include It’s About Dogs, illustrated by Ted Rand, Very Scary, illustrated by Douglas Florian, and The Day of the Dead, illustrated by Jeanette Winter. She lives with her family in California.

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