Small Business in Paradise: Working for Yourself in a Place You Love
  • Small Business in Paradise: Working for Yourself in a Place You Love
  • Small Business in Paradise: Working for Yourself in a Place You Love

Small Business in Paradise: Working for Yourself in a Place You Love

by Michael Molinski
     
 

Ready to go into business in a place you love? Take the first step -- get Small Business in Paradise!

We've all daydreamed of working and living where our hearts belong. Often, these thoughts remain fantasies - after all, how do you get started, and how do you succeed? Find answers to these questions and more in Small Business in…  See more details below

Overview

Ready to go into business in a place you love? Take the first step -- get Small Business in Paradise!

We've all daydreamed of working and living where our hearts belong. Often, these thoughts remain fantasies - after all, how do you get started, and how do you succeed? Find answers to these questions and more in Small Business in Paradise.

It's inspirational: Read in-depth profiles of and interviews with entrepreneurs who took the leap and built successful businesses in the places they dreamed of calling home.

It's practical: Find step-by-step guidance on how to...

• launch a new business
•research your market
•build a seasonal business
•hire the right people
•advertise and promote your business
•comply with local regulations
•get involved in your community

Plus, Small Business in Paradise provides a CD packed with checklists and resources that will help you stay on track while pursuing your ambitions.

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Editorial Reviews

Chester Elton
A gift to all of us who have dreamed of a better life in a better place. Michael Molinski shows how a business can be run with passion in some of the most beautiful places on the planet.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781413307436
Publisher:
NOLO
Publication date:
11/22/2007
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1 - The Dream Isn't Always the Same

You've been working in the same field for 20 or 30 years.
The rate race is getting to you.
You're bored, tired, burned out.
You're looking for a change.
You start to wonder what else is out there.

Sound familiar? Millions of Americans find themselves in the same predicament. And many of them wonder at some time or other about moving to some remote locale, living simply and starting their own business. The dream, however, isn't always the same. It may be a bar in Key West, a surf shop in Costa Rica, a ski shop in Aspen, a winery in Napa. Perhaps it's not the business that's new, just the locale - your accounting firm in Vermont, a restaurant in Maui, your dental office on Bainbridge Island, or your consulting firm just about anywhere. Regardless, for most of us who have the dream it remains just that - a dream. For whatever reason, be it funding, know-how or just plain old-fashioned hootspa -- our dreams never get off the ground. We stay in our corporate jobs, until one day we're ready to retire to the Winnebago and that house in Sun City.
Consider that a whopping three-fourths of U.S. workers are either actively or passively looking for a new job at any given time, according to the 2006 U.S. Job Retention Survey, conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). For those who did voluntarily leave their jobs, their reasons were less about money or career opportunities, and increasingly about the need for a change.
As the graphic below shows, "Ready for a new experience" was the second biggest reason that employees left their jobs in 2006, according to the survey. That's up from a distant fourthplace just two years earlier. Similarly, "Career change" also moved up sharply, to 5th place in 2006 from 8th in 2004.
What do those statistics tell you? That Americans, or at least a good part of them, are becoming increasingly tired of the rat race. They are deriving less and less satisfaction from working in corporate America, feeling bored and under-appreciated, fed up with an increasing lack of job security and the perception of poor management. They're also finding it harder and harder to balance work and life issues, according to the SHRM survey.
Some U.S. companies are finally getting the hint, and are initiating new programs specifically designed to retain unhappy employees - merit bonuses, career development opportunities, flexible work schedules and telecommuting, childcare, more vacation time.
Still, they have been unable to stop the flow. Increasingly, Americans are striking out more on their own - setting up small businesses or sole proprietorships, becoming contractors, working from home.
(Stats here and a graph from the u.s. employment survey).
Dan Pink, author of Free Agent Nation, points out that fewer than one in 10 Americans now work for a Fortune 500 Company, and that the largest private employer in America, by body count, is no longer General Motors, AT&T or even Microsoft -- it's Manpower, Inc., the temporary employment agency. And an increasing number of Manpower's workers are choosing temporary work because it offers a better work-life balance, not because they can't find permanent work.
More and more entrepreneurs are setting up shop not in the big cities where they've made their livelihoods, but in paradise - the resort towns, mountain communities, island retreats and beaches of the world - where keeping up with the Joneses gives way to quality of life.
Meanwhile, another major trend is also indirectly driving the quest for paradise - the aging of America. Some . . . million baby boomers will hit retirement age over the next . . . years. But many of them are nowhere near ready for "retirement" in the traditional sense of the word. The number of Americans aged 65 or older who are remaining in the work force is increasingly rising, from 10% to 1985 to 13% in 2002, and a projected 16%, or 26.6 million workers, in 2010, according to the U.S. Department of the Census and the AARP Foundation.
While many of those workers will continue doing the same type of work they've always done, many others are looking for a change - both a career change and a lifestyle change. For many of those, a small business in paradise is the perfect solution - affording recent retirees with the career change they are looking for and the active involvement they seek, while also giving them the quality of life they've always envisioned retirement could be.
But not so fast! As we mentioned in the preface, running a small business in paradise isn't always, well, paradise! Like any other enterprise, it takes careful planning and meticulous execution to get it right, and can often take years before you finally reach the "comfort zone." Is it for you? That's what the next 13 chapters are designed to help you find out.

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Meet the Author

Michael Molinski is a veteran writer, spending 15 years as a reporter, editor and foreign correspondent at Bloomberg News, CBS MarketWatch and United Press International. Molinski later founded a business communications company and helped found a strategy research firm. He is the author and co-author of several books about small business and entrepreneurship. Molinski makes his home in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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