Small Change: The Economics of Child Support

Overview

During the 1980s, the issue of child support emerged on the national agenda. Federal and state governments in the United States focused on the private obligations of parents to support their children, strengthening existing child support laws and establishing new ones. In this book, Andrea H. Beller and John W. Graham discuss what went right and what went wrong with child support payments during this period, investigating the socioeconomic and legal factors that determined child support awards and receipts, ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $2.39   
  • New (1) from $87.23   
  • Used (14) from $2.39   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$87.23
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(821)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

During the 1980s, the issue of child support emerged on the national agenda. Federal and state governments in the United States focused on the private obligations of parents to support their children, strengthening existing child support laws and establishing new ones. In this book, Andrea H. Beller and John W. Graham discuss what went right and what went wrong with child support payments during this period, investigating the socioeconomic and legal factors that determined child support awards and receipts, documenting why few gains were made in child support overall during the 1980s, and offering policy recommendations for the future. Analyzing Census Bureau data on child support awards and receipts beginning in 1979, Beller and Graham find that there were some minor improvements in the system and that these were due to changes in the legal and social environment surrounding child support. However, say the authors, many problems persist: the real value of child support awards and receipts has declined sharply, and black and never-married mothers, despite making some gains, continue to fare worse in the process than do nonblack and previously married mothers. The authors evaluate the effectiveness of new, federally mandated child support enforcement techniques and guidelines by focusing on how such laws worked in states that had them prior to the federal mandate. They also look for the first time at the indirect consequences of child support, showing how it affects mothers' decisions about work, welfare, and remarriage and their children's decisions about continuing their education.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
During the 1980s, the issue of child support emerged on the national agenda, as federal and state governments focused on the private obligations of parents to support their children, strengthening existing child support laws and establishing new ones. Beller and Graham discuss what went right and what went wrong with child support payments during this period, investigating the socioeconomic and legal factors that determined child support awards and receipts, documenting why few gains were made in child support overall during the 1980s, and offering policy recommendations for the future. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Jessica Pearson
In their book, SMALL CHANGE: THE ECONOMICS OF CHILD SUPPORT, Andrea Beller and John Graham examine aggregate trends in child support over the period 1978-1986. Their analyses rely on data gleaned in the child support supplement to the Current Population Survey, first administered in 1979 and conducted biennially thereafter. The combined data set they manipulate contains information about 16,000 mothers eligible for child support including 4,000 black and 3,000 never married mothers. This allows the authors to compare child support experience for blacks and non-blacks, married and never-married parents. Their analyses occur within a framework of economic modelling that emphasizes the benefits and costs of child support for mothers and the fathers' ability and willingness to pay in explaining child support outcomes. Beller and Graham reach a number of conclusions about the child support system and how it has evolved during a time period of increasing federal involvement. Their findings underscore the inadequacy of the system for black and never married women, sub- groups that have grown disproportionately in the last few decades. On virtually every indicator of child support outcome, these women fare dramatically worse than their non-black and ever-married counterparts. Granted, AFDC recipients, many of whom are black and/or never married, have received disproportionate enforcement attention by child support agencies and these populations have consequently experienced certain increases in award and collection rates. Nevertheless, their overall standing with respect to awards, order levels and receipts lag far behind. Although the authors do not focus on the policy implications of this finding, it does raise serious questions about the whole premise of private transfer as a remedy for those with out-of-wedlock births and minority poverty. Among non-black and ever-married women, the authors find evidence of only small increases in award and receipt rates, suggesting that efforts to strengthen child support enforcement may have been partially successful. Although they find no evidence that government spending for child support has increased child support receipts, they find some evidence that certain enforcement techniques have been helpful including criminal penalties and wage withholding. Administrative procedures, on the other hand, appear to be associated with lower receipt rates. It should be noted that these data were collected prior to the implementation of many new aggressive enforcement remedies. In any event, evidence of modest increases in award and receipt rates were more than offset by a 25 percent decline in the real dollar amount of child support payments made during 1978-1986. The authors attribute this to the failure of child support order levels to keep up with inflation and changes in the real incomes of fathers, although they note that real incomes of fathers stagnated after 1973. The obvious remedy to this problem is the utilization of child support guidelines to establish order levels that reflect parental income. This too became mandatory in 1988 pursuant to the enactment of the Family Support Act, along with requirements for periodic review and updating of old awards at the request of either party. Again, given the time frame of their study, Beller and Graham offer no reading on the impact of these and other provisions of the Child Support Enforcement Amendments of 1984 and the 1988 Family Support Act. My biggest frustration with this book is that it feels out of date. The last year for which data was utilized in this study was 1986. Since then, legislation has been enacted requiring states to improve paternity establishment or face financial penalties, utilize presumptive child support guidelines, institute periodic updating of child support awards and routinely use income Page 110 follows: withholding and other enforcement remedies. The architects of child support guidelines and other remedies embodied in recent legislation have predicted dramatic impacts on child support award and payment patterns. The research that my colleagues and I have conducted comparing awards promulgated prior to and following the adoption of presumptive guidelines in specific jurisdictions suggests that these impacts have been extremely modest. Has the new legislation translated into substantial gains? Which sub-groups, if any, have benefitted? Why and why not? To my mind, these are the vital questions that need to be addressed. Unfortunately, this book does not do the job. Another frustration I have with this book is the nature of the CPS data they utilized to operationalize the variables in their model. Father's ability to pay was measured by the socioeconomic characteristics of mothers and was supplemented by mean income data of year-round, full-time male workers by race. In a similar vein, information about the mother was used to represent father's desire to pay child support. Even mother's expected benefits and costs were indirectly measured through the limited available data on her marital status, education level and numbers and ages of her children. There were absolutely no direct measures of many of the determinants of child support outcomes including father's income, father's employment status and stability, father's remarriage, current living arrangements for mothers and fathers, custody and visitation arrangements and the relationship between the parents. The authors concede these limitations but indicate that they aren't so critical given their interest in revealing racial and marital status differentials and trends over time. Critical or not, the result is a limited book that documents what is obvious to anyone who has worked with the child support system: that it is bad for everyone but worse for blacks and never-marrieds.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300053623
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication date: 7/28/1993
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 6.51 (w) x 9.54 (h) x 1.56 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
Foreword
Preface
1 Introduction 1
2 Aggregate Differentials and Trends in Child Support Payments 16
3 An Economic Model of Child Support 55
4 Child Support Awards: Determinants, Differentials, and Trends 82
5 Child Support Receipts: Determinants, Differentials, and Trends 125
6 The Legal Environment 161
7 The Economic Consequences of Child Support Payments 211
8 A Policy Agenda for Child Support in the 1990s 248
Appendixes 263
Abbreviations 279
Notes 281
References 323
Index 333
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)