Small Comrades: Revolutionizing Childhood in Soviet Russia, 1917-1932

Small Comrades: Revolutionizing Childhood in Soviet Russia, 1917-1932

by Lisa A. Kirschenbaum, Kirschenbaum Li
     
 

ISBN-10: 0815339453

ISBN-13: 9780815339458

Pub. Date: 12/28/2000

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Small Comrades is a fascinating examination of Soviet conceptions of childhood and the resulting policies directed toward children. Working on the assumption that cultural representations and self-representations are not entirely separable, this book probes how the Soviet regime's representations structured teachers' observations of their pupils and often…  See more details below

Overview

Small Comrades is a fascinating examination of Soviet conceptions of childhood and the resulting policies directed toward children. Working on the assumption that cultural representations and self-representations are not entirely separable, this book probes how the Soviet regime's representations structured teachers' observations of their pupils and often adults' recollections of their childhood. The book draws on work that has been done on Soviet schooling, and focuses specifically on the development of curricula and institutions, but it also examines the wider context of the relationship between the family and the state, and to the Bolshevik vision of the "children of October"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815339458
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Series:
RoutledgeFalmer Studies in the History of Education
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
242
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Introduction: Real and Imagined Children

Part One: The Kindergarten and the Revolutionary Tradition in Russia

1. Pedagogy and Politics

Part Two: The Children of October and the Civil War

2. "Save the Children"

3. The Family as Fiction

4. The Nature of Childhood

Part Three: Rethinking Revolution and Childhood, 1921-1932

5. The Withering Away of Kindergarten

6. Rescripting Childhood

7. "Thank You, Comrade Stalin, for Our Happy Childhood"

Conclusion

Postscript: Three Childhoods

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