Smart Love: The Compassionate Alternative to Discipline That Will Make You a Better Parent and Your Child a Better Person

Smart Love: The Compassionate Alternative to Discipline That Will Make You a Better Parent and Your Child a Better Person

by Martha Heineman Pieper, William J. Pieper
     
 

No parent wants to be a disciplinarian, but most fear that the only alternative is permissiveness. Not so, say Drs. Martha and William Pieper, the husband-wife team, parents of five themselves, who have written this revolutionary new volume based on years of ground-breaking research. Smart Love shows that putting children's inner happiness, not their outward

Overview

No parent wants to be a disciplinarian, but most fear that the only alternative is permissiveness. Not so, say Drs. Martha and William Pieper, the husband-wife team, parents of five themselves, who have written this revolutionary new volume based on years of ground-breaking research. Smart Love shows that putting children's inner happiness, not their outward behavior, first actually will make them better behaved and, in the long run, more confident and responsible.

Editorial Reviews

Sally D. Ketchum
Smart Love teaches parents how to nurture from infancy to adolescence. Enlightened readers can now make the best decisions for their children.
ForeWord Magazine
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Though the term "smart love" seems strangely incongruous, some parents may find the theory attractive, especially those who have been unsuccessful or uncomfortable with such popular parenting methods as using negative consequences, rewards or time-out periods. The Piepers (she is a psychotherapist, he is a psychiatrist) focus on the parent's understanding of the child's developmental stage and instruct the parent to react to the child's behavior in a manner that is "compassionate rather than coercive." Punishments and rewards are both unadvised. Though the smart love "guidelines" referred to throughout the text never crystallize in a complete list, the main premise involves preserving the child's "inner happiness" by using "loving regulation" (reacting to the child without making her or him feel unhappy or rejected). The Piepers disagree with such practices as letting a baby "cry it out" and claim that time-outs cause kids to feel angry and self-rejecting. Oddly, however, they suggest weaning the baby at 11 months, rather than letting the child take the lead. While many parents may find the Piepers' advice a bit too demanding of their attention and patience, others may happily grasp the advice to "go the extra mile" for their child.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558321427
Publisher:
Harvard Common Press, The
Publication date:
03/11/1999
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.93(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >