Smells Like Dog

( 71 )

Overview

Meet Homer Pudding, an ordinary farm boy who's got big dreams-to follow in the footsteps of his famous treasure-hunting uncle. But when Uncle Drake mysteriously disappears, Homer inherits two things: a lazy, droopy dog with no sense of smell, and a mystery.

Why would his uncle call this clumsy dog his ...
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Smells Like Dog

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Overview

Meet Homer Pudding, an ordinary farm boy who's got big dreams-to follow in the footsteps of his famous treasure-hunting uncle. But when Uncle Drake mysteriously disappears, Homer inherits two things: a lazy, droopy dog with no sense of smell, and a mystery.

Why would his uncle call this clumsy dog his "most treasured possession?" And why did he put a gold coin on the dog's collar?

And who will continue Uncle Drake's quest-to find the most coveted pirate treasure in the world?

Join Homer, his sister Gwendolyn, and Dog on an adventure that will test their wits and courage as they leave their peaceful farm and head into a world where ruthless treasure hunters hide around every corner. Where they discover that Dog has a hidden talent and that treasure might be closer than they ever imagined. . .
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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
"Fans who enjoy the editorializing and over-the-top humor in Wendelin Van Draanen's Gecko and Sticky series will take pleasure in this misfit duo's quirky adventures."
Rebecca Stead
"A fantastic tale in every good sense of the word... Homer W. Pudding: my kind of hero."
Sarah Beth Durst
"Full of fantastic characters (eccentric adventurers, sinister and surprising villains, and one droopy but very special dog), delightful humor, and wonderful adventures, this book is a treasure. Every page made me smile."
From the Publisher
Praise for Smells Like Dog:
* "Selfors offers up an adventure tale that features a humorous, high-stakes mystery and a lovable hero...Peppered with funny dialogue, this joyous romp is a page-turning adventure that will appeal to enthusiastic and reluctant readers alike."—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"A fantastic tale in every good sense of the word... Homer W. Pudding: my kind of hero."—Rebecca Stead, author of Newbery Medal winner When You Reach Me

"Fans who enjoy the editorializing and over-the-top humor in Wendelin Van Draanen's Gecko and Sticky series will take pleasure in this misfit duo's quirky adventures."—Booklist

"Full of fantastic characters (eccentric adventurers, sinister and surprising villains, and one droopy but very special dog), delightful humor, and wonderful adventures, this book is a treasure. Every page made me smile."—Sarah Beth Durst, author of Into the Wild and Out of the Wild

"Join a delightful band of misfits on a rollicking adventure... Full of fantasy, fun and humorous dialogue, this will attract dog lovers, mystery enthusiasts, adventure addicts, and reluctant readers."—VOYA

Children's Literature - Emily Griffin
Homer Winslow Pudding dreams of being a famous treasure hunter like his uncle, explorer Drake Pudding. Life on his family's goat farm in the quiet town of Milkydale does not seem to hold the adventure Homer desires until the law firm of Snooty and Snooty brings the tragic news that Drake was eaten by a giant tortoise. Now, Homer has inherited the saddest, droopiest-looking, scent-challenged basset hound ever—and a mystery. Attached to Dog's collar is a coin engraved with the initials "L.O.S.T." Homer, his older sister Gwendolyn—who dreams of being a Royal Taxidermist for the Museum of Natural History—and Dog head to The City where Homer discovers the truth about his uncle's death and the secret society of adventurers known as L.O.S.T. Told with wit, charm, and heart, Suzanne Selfors' story will have you rooting for Homer Pudding—the chunky kid from Milkydale who likes to read maps, is not any good at sports, carries a compass, and daydreams about treasure hunting. This is a humorous, middle-grade novel that will particularly appeal to boys and is recommended. Reviewer: Emily Griffin
VOYA - Susan Allen
Join a delightful band of misfits on a rollicking adventure that centers on a dog that can't smell and treasure hunting. Homer Pudding, son of a goat farmer, dreams of being a treasure hunter like his Uncle Drake. When his uncle dies in a tortoise accident, he is left a dog that can't smell, as well as unforeseen danger. Several people are looking for Rumpold Smeller's treasure map, which his uncle found and many think Homer now has. Homer is followed and eventually kidnapped by a man flying a cloud chopper. He is invited to the Natural History Museum but told not to bring his parents; instead his sister Gwendolyn goes. Gwendolyn wants to be the Royal Taxidermist for the museum and sees this as her opportunity to impress the director with all her stuffed dead animals, but evil lurks there as well. Along the way Homer meets a female giant and a homeless girl who sells soup. All of these people help Homer figure out what his uncle's "most treasured possession" was and how it fits into his dream of treasure hunting. Full of fantasy, fun, and humorous dialogue, this will attract dog lovers, mystery enthusiasts, adventure addicts, and reluctant readers. A thoroughly enjoyable read. Reviewer: Susan Allen
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—Homer Pudding is a luckless 12-year-old who dreams of hunting treasure like the uncle he idolizes. When his uncle is eaten by a killer tortoise, Homer gets swept into the middle of a treacherous race to locate a pirate's treasure. A whimsical narration and sometimes comical dialogue add a light touch—but perhaps not quite light enough, as the boy's initial cheerlessness makes him hard to warm up to. The pace picks up when he arrives in The City, however, and gets himself out of danger more than once by using his wits. He is aided by Dog, a peculiar basset who turns out to have surprising sleuthing skills of his own, though readers will figure this out long before Homer does. The main villain is appropriately over-the-top: she's a ruthless museum director who seeks the treasure for personal gain, rather than sharing with the world. Occasionally silly plot contrivances make Homer's journey less than gripping, but they match the consistent mix of silliness and action. The boy's growth from hapless loser to skilled treasure hunter is fairly convincing; Homer uses his uncle's advice and the story of the Odyssey for inspiration and steadily gains confidence. The supporting cast is quirky and mildly amusing, if not especially memorable. The perky homeless girl who aids, and then betrays, Homer is more intriguing, though; the conclusion sets her up as a potential rival or possible friend in future installments.—Steven Engelfried, Multnomah County Library, OR
Kirkus Reviews
Selfors offers up an adventure tale that features a humorous, high-stakes mystery and a lovable hero. Twelve-year-old Homer Pudding lives on a goat farm but dreams of growing up to be a great treasure hunter like his uncle, Drake Pudding. Drake spent most of his career searching for the greatest mass of loot collected by another great treasure hunter, the late Rumpold Smeller. When Drake dies under mysterious circumstances, he bequeaths a sad-eyed basset hound named Dog to Homer. Attached to Dog's collar is a coin etched with the letters L.O.S.T. As Homer races to decipher the meaning of L.O.S.T., find Smeller's treasure and locate the whereabouts of Drake's vast library, he discovers a valuable secret about Dog. Along the way, Homer encounters the devious Madame la Directeur, the pink-haired homeless girl Lorelei, Ajitabh, the inventor of the cloudcopter, and other equally memorable characters who help or hinder his quest. Peppered with funny dialogue, this joyous romp is a page-turning adventure that will appeal to enthusiastic and reluctant readers alike. (Adventure. 8-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316043977
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/12/2011
  • Series: Smells Like Dog Series
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 79,539
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Suzanne Selfors

Suzanne Selfors is the author of the Imaginary Veterinary series, the Smells Like Dog series, Fortune's Magic Farm, To Catch a Mermaid, and many other books. Rumor has it that just like the hero of Smells Like Dog, she dreams of becoming a famous treasure hunter. With the help of her loyal dog, Skylos, she's dug many holes in her backyard. Her most prized discoveries include a piece of petrified wood, a petrified slug, and something that resembles a shrunken head, but this has yet to be confirmed.
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First Chapter

Smells Like Dog


By Selfors, Suzanne

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2010 Selfors, Suzanne
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780316043984

PART ONE

THE PUDDING FARM

1

Breakfast with the Puddings

What Homer Pudding didn’t know on that breezy Sunday morning, as he carried a pail of fresh goat milk across the yard, was that his life was about to change.

In a big way.

What he did know was this: That the country sky was its usual eggshell blue, that the air was its usual springtime fresh, and that his chores were their usual boring, boring, boring.

For how exciting can it be cleaning up after goats? And that’s what Homer had done for most of his twelve years. Each year his chore list grew longer, taking more time away from the thing that he’d rather do. The one thing. The only thing. But it was not playing football, or riding a bike. Not swimming, or fishing, or building a fort.

If he didn’t have to rake goat poop, or change straw bedding, or chase goats out of the flower bed, Homer Winslow Pudding would have more time to dream about the day when he’d become a famous treasure hunter like his uncle.

“Daydreaming doesn’t have any place on a farm,” his father often told him. “There’s too much work to be done.”

But Homer dreamed anyway.

Mrs. Pudding waved from the kitchen window. She needed the milk for her morning coffee. Homer picked up his pace, his rubber boots kicking up fallen cherry blossoms. As he stumbled across a gnarled root, a white wave splashed over the side of the bucket. Warm goat milk ran down his sleeve and dribbled onto the grass where it was quickly lapped up by the farm’s border collies.

“Careful there,” Mr. Pudding called as he strode up the driveway, gravel crunching beneath his heavy work boots. He tucked the Sunday newspaper under his arm. “Your mother will be right disappointed if she don’t get her milk.”

Homer almost fell over, his legs tangled in a mass of licking dogs. “Go on,” he said. The dogs obeyed. The big one, named Max, scratched at a flea that was doing morning calisthenics on his neck. Max was a working dog, like the others, trained to herd the Puddings’ goats. He even worked on Sundays while city dogs slept in or went on picnics. Every day is a workday on a farm.

And that’s where this story begins—on the Pudding Goat Farm. A prettier place you’d be hard pressed to find. If you perched at the top of one of the cherry trees you’d see a big barn that sagged in the middle as if a giant had sat on it, a little farmhouse built from river rocks, and an old red truck. Look farther and you’d see an endless tapestry of rolling hills, each painted a different hue of spring green. “Heaven on earth,” Mrs. Pudding often said. Homer didn’t agree. Surely in heaven there wouldn’t be so many things to fix and clean and haul.

The dogs stayed outside while Mr. Pudding and Homer slipped off their boots and went into the kitchen. Because the Pudding family always ate breakfast together at the kitchen table, it was the perfect place to share news and ask questions like, Whatcha gonna do at school today? or Who’s gonna take a bath tonight? or Why is that dead squirrel lying on the table?

“Because I’m gonna stuff it.”

“Gwendolyn Maybel Pudding. How many times have I told you not to put dead things on the kitchen table?” Mr. Pudding asked as he hung his cap on a hook.

“I don’t know,” Gwendolyn grumbled, tossing her long brown hair.

Homer set the milk pail on the counter, then washed his hands at the sink. His little brother, who everybody called Squeak, but whose legal name was Pip, tugged at Homer’s pant leg. “Hi, Homer.”

Homer looked down at the wide-eyed, freckled face. “Hi, Squeak,” he said, patting his brother’s head. Squeak may have been too young to understand Homer’s dreams, but he was always happy to listen to stories about sunken pirate ships or lost civilizations.

“Get that squirrel off the table,” Mr. Pudding said, also washing his hands at the sink.

Gwendolyn picked up the squirrel by its tail. The stiff body swung back and forth like the arm of a silent metronome. “I don’t see why it’s such a problem.”

“It’s dead, that’s why it’s a problem. I eat on that table so I don’t want dead things lying on it.”

Confrontations between Gwendolyn and Mr. Pudding had become a daily event in the Pudding household, ever since last summer when Gwendolyn had turned fifteen and had gotten all moody. In the same breath she might laugh, then burst into tears, then sink into a brooding silence. She befuddled Homer. But most girls befuddled Homer.

He took his usual seat at the end of the pine plank table, hoping that the argument wouldn’t last too long. He wanted to finish his chores so he could get back to reading his new map. It had arrived yesterday in a cardboard tube from the Map of the Month Club, a Christmas gift from Uncle Drake. Homer had stayed up late studying the map, but as every clever treasure hunter knows, a map can be read a thousand times and still hide secrets. He’d studied an Incan temple map eighty-two times before discovering the hidden passage below the temple’s well. “Excellent job,” his uncle Drake had said. “I would never have found that at your age. You’re a natural born treasure hunter.”

But the new map would have to wait because the morning argument was just gathering steam. Clutching the squirrel, Gwendolyn peered over the table’s edge. It wasn’t that she was short. It was just that she almost always sat slumped real low in her chair, like a melted person, and all anyone saw during meals was the top of her head. “You eat dead things all the time and you eat them on this table so I don’t see the difference.” She glared at her father.

“Now Gwendolyn, if you’re going to talk back to your father, please wait until we’ve finished eating,” Mrs. Pudding said. She stood at the stove stirring the porridge. “Let’s try to have breakfast without so much commotion, like a normal family.”

“And without dead squirrels,” Mr. Pudding added, taking his seat at the head of the table. “Or dead frogs, or dead mice, or dead anything.”

“But I’ve got to practice. If I don’t learn how to make dead animals look like they ain’t dead, then how will I get a job as a Royal Taxidermist at the Museum of Natural History?”

“Gwendolyn said ain’t,” Squeak said, climbing next to Homer. “That’s bad.”

Mr. Pudding shook his head—a slow kind of shake that was heavy with worry. “Royal Taxidermist for the Museum of Natural History. What kind of job is that? Way off in The City, with all that noise and pollution. With all that crime and vagrancy. That’s no place for a Pudding.”

“Uncle Drake moved to The City,” Gwendolyn said, emphasizing her point with a dramatic sweep of the squirrel. “And he’s doing right fine.”

“How do you know?” Mr. Pudding asked with a scowl. “We don’t even know where he lives in The City. All he’s given us is a post office box for an address. And we haven’t heard a word from him since his last visit. Not a letter. Not a postcard. What makes you think he’s doing right fine?”

“No news is good news,” Mrs. Pudding said. She set bowls of porridge in front of Mr. Pudding and Squeak, then set a bowl for Gwendolyn. “Now stop arguing, you two, and eat your breakfast. And put away that squirrel.”

Gwendolyn stomped her foot, then tucked the squirrel under her chair.

As Mr. Pudding stirred his porridge, steam rose from the bowl and danced beneath his chin. “I told him not to go. The City’s no place for a Pudding. That’s what I told him. But he said he had important matters to tend to. Said he had to find out about that pirate, Stinky somebody or other.”

“Rumpold Smeller,” Homer corrected, suddenly interested in the conversation. “Duke Rumpold Smeller of Estonia became a very famous pirate. His treasure has never been found. Uncle Drake wants to be the first person to find it.”

Mr. Pudding groaned. Gwendolyn rolled her eyes.

“Eat your porridge, Homer,” Mrs. Pudding said, setting an overflowing bowl in front of him. Then she planted a smooch on the top of his curly-haired head.

Mr. Pudding motioned to his wife. Though she bent close to him and though he whispered in her ear, everyone at the table could hear. “Why’d you give him so much? Don’t you think he’s getting kind of… chunky?”

She put her hands on her hips. “He’s a growing boy. He needs to eat.” Then she smiled sweetly at Homer.

Now, Mrs. Pudding loved all three of her children equally, like any good mother. But love can be expressed in different ways. For instance, Mrs. Pudding knew that her eldest child had a mind of her own, so she gave Gwendolyn lots of room to be an individual. Mrs. Pudding knew that her youngest child wanted to be helpful, so she gave Squeak lots of encouragement and praise. And Mrs. Pudding knew, and it broke her heart to know, that her middle child was friendless, so she gave Homer extra helpings of food and more kisses than anyone else in the house.

“Growing boy,” Mr. Pudding grumbled. “How’s he ever gonna fit in if he can’t run as fast as the other boys? If all he talks about is treasure hunting? It’s my brother’s fault, filling his head with all that nonsense.”

It’s not nonsense, Homer thought, shoveling porridge into his mouth. So what if he didn’t fit in with the other boys? All they cared about was fighting and getting into trouble. He pulled the bowl closer. And so what if he was chunky? A true treasure hunter would never pass up the chance to eat a warm breakfast. Near starvation while stranded on a deserted island had forced more than a few treasure hunters to eat their own toes.

“I like twesure,” Squeak said, porridge dribbling down his chin.

“I like treasure, too,” Homer said.

Mr. Pudding drummed his calloused fingers on the table. “Could we go just one meal without talking about finding treasure? Or stuffing dead animals? I don’t know where I went wrong with you children.”

Mrs. Pudding poured herself a cup of coffee, then added a ladle of fresh milk. “There’s nothing wrong with having interests.”

Interests?” Mr. Pudding scratched the back of his weathered neck. “Stuffing dead animals and finding lost treasure—what kind of interests are those? Why can’t they be interested in goat farming? Is that too much to ask? Who’s gonna run this farm when I’m too old to run it?”

“Me,” Squeak said. “I like goats.”

As sweet as that sounded, it gave Mr. Pudding no peace of mind. Squeak was only five years old. Yesterday he had wanted to be a dragon-slayer.

“Goat farming’s honest, solid work,” Mr. Pudding said, dumping brown sugar on his porridge. “You children don’t understand the importance of honest, solid work.”

Gwendolyn rolled her eyes again. Then she sank deeper, until her bottom was hanging off the edge of her chair. Homer was bored by the conversation again. He tried to dig a hole in his porridge but the sides kept caving in—like trying to dig for treasure in mud.

Now, Mr. Pudding loved all three of his children equally, like any good father. But he didn’t believe that giving them extra room to be individuals, or giving extra encouragement or extra food and kisses, did much good. Solid work meant a solid life, which in turn meant a roof, and a bed, and food on the table. What could be more important than that?

Mr. Pudding pushed his empty bowl aside, then unrolled the Sunday City Paper. “Wouldn’t surprise me one bit if I started reading and found out that my brother had been robbed or had fallen into a manhole. I’m sure something terrible’s gonna happen to him. The City’s a terrible place.”

As he read, muttering and shaking his head, the children finished their breakfast. Gwendolyn carried her bowl to the sink, as did Homer.

“Mom, when I’m done cleaning the stalls, can I go read my new map?” Homer asked.

“Of course.” Mrs. Pudding kissed Homer’s soft cheek, then whispered in his ear. “I believe in you, Homer. I know you’ll find treasure one day.”

Homer looked into his mother’s brown eyes with their big flecks of gold—like coins half-buried in the sand. When he became a famous treasure hunter, he’d give all the jewels to her so she could wear a different necklace every day and buy new dresses and shoes. And one of those fancy crowns that beauty queens wear.

But chores came first. He started for the kitchen door when Mr. Pudding waved the newspaper and hollered, “I knew it! I knew something terrible would happen to him!”



Continues...

Excerpted from Smells Like Dog by Selfors, Suzanne Copyright © 2010 by Selfors, Suzanne. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 71 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(61)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 71 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 14, 2010

    Delightful

    This is the story of two outcasts - Homer Pudding, a friendless boy who reads maps and wants to be a famous treasure hunter, and Dog, a dog who can't smell. Together they set out on a wild adventure, at the core of which is a heartwarming and funny story of courage and friendship. Like Selfors's other stories, this one is sure to please fans of Roald Dahl.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Best book in the world

    You have to read it you can never put the book down it keeps u scared on every page

    Love it!!!

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    I love this book!!!!!!!

    This bookis amazing. I read he second book first. (Dont know why) Smells like treasure is the second book and it is my favorite book of all time. Both books are more then worth its money. Homer and his dog Dog are really funny and they go on amazing adventures.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Awesome

    This is the best book ive ever read

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 26, 2011

    Love this book

    Got this book and i couldnt stop reading!! I have this book at home but im still going to get a free sample on this!!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2012

    One of the best

    This one of the best books i have ever read. Trut me this book is awesome.
    -June

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2014

    AWESOME: )

    I love this book.Hi my name is Emma and I'm 10 going on11. My teacher assigned this book to the class and we had one week to finish it and I did it in TWO DAYS!!!!!!!! It is sooo saspenceful . But it's a great book for my age group: )

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    Books graet Thebooks great anser to looks great... thebooks great

    Awesome book please dont go elmo on me

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2013

    Smelly

    When i was reading the story it actually smelled like dog that never knew what a bath was

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    Anonymous

    This is the best book I've ever read.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    I <3 this sooooooo much!

    Iwould really rate this 1,00000000 stars. This book is about a normal farm boy who finds a task to do. It is a good book for a 8-10 year old would read but but appropreat for any age.
    I hope this helps you
    - a friend

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2012

    So so so so so good

    This is a great great great book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    BEST BOOK EVER!!!!!!!

    !I love this book its fun to read and has a happy ending like she says it does really recommend it¿

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2012

    Dancer1

    It is an awesome book!
    U r awesome for writing this book Suzane Collins!
    Who ever is reading this reviev should try 2 read this book!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    Omg i have this book

    This is one of the best books ive ever read. Thats saying alot, coming from a girl who goes to the library, like, every week. Let me tell you a little about it:













    This book is about a middle child named Homer, who lives on a farm, far away from the big city. Homers loves his uncle ( his fathers brother), and both of them share the same pasion— treasure hunting. Although Homers uncle does it professionally and lives in the big city, Homer can only dream of such things. Homer spends all the time he has to look at the maps and books about treasure hunting his uncle gave to him. Homers father discourages all those activities and thinks that living in the city is not right, and that Homer has better things to do. But everything changes when they find out that Homersuncle died, and left him nothing but the pair of shoes he was wearing the day he died, and the droopiest, strangest, most hilarious dog you can ever imagine......


    But one things for sure—this is NOT a sad dog story! :)


    I give this book a gazillion stars. Its a definite must read for all ages 8+

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    BREATH IS TAKEN AWAY BY THIS MASTERPIECE!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Omg! this book is amazing!!!!! Ive read the sequal and this book and im very eagerly reading the third book smells like pirates! Suzanne selfors is a very talented author!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    MOST BORING BOOK EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    &*; hggfghnnvvffxxxsddcbkiolmmbvggkkjjv"!!##2@@123*70

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2014

    Mystery book

    This book is an awesome. I am 12 going on 13. This is a great mystery that i got for under $10 at our school book fair. Great mystery book. I dont ever want to put it down. I have to admit that our teacher says to finish a book in a week, but i have been reading it for at least 2 weeks. It is a little challenging but SO AMAZING!!! I want to get the next ones after this Smells like Treasure and Smells like Pirates. This is the first book( Smells like Dog). And yes they keep the dog's name Dog. At least so far!! Page 261.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2013

    Epic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Best book ever this book is for every one

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 20, 2013

    Great Book

    Bought the book for my son. I read it and enjoyed it completely. Had to purchase the next books in the series to follow the adventures of the characters in the first book.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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