Smile, Principessa!

Smile, Principessa!

by Judith Ross Enderle, Stephanie Jacob Gordon, Serena Curmi
     
 

Mama and Papa call their little Principessa bambina Bina, and Papa takes her picture every day. "Smile, Bina!" he says.

Snap! Snap! Snap!

Thousands of pictures!

Then bambino Pasquale — Bino — is born, and everything changes. Papa doesn't take pictures of Bina anymore; now he only seems to care about making Bino smile!

Overview

Mama and Papa call their little Principessa bambina Bina, and Papa takes her picture every day. "Smile, Bina!" he says.

Snap! Snap! Snap!

Thousands of pictures!

Then bambino Pasquale — Bino — is born, and everything changes. Papa doesn't take pictures of Bina anymore; now he only seems to care about making Bino smile! Pooey!

How Principessa gets her smile back is the heart of this charming story that is perfect for little ones and their new siblings.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Monserrat Urena
Mama and Papa Razzi have always given all their attention to their "Principesa bambina," Bina. Papa Razzi was always taking pictures of little Bina. Then "bambino Pasquale" Bino was born. Suddenly, Bino is getting all the attention, and Bina does not like it. She decides that she is never going to smile again. She runs and hides in the closet. Sulking under her blankets, she does not answer when her parents begin to look for her. It is little Bino who finally finds his older sister. Mama and Papa Razzi try to convince Bina of their love, to make her smile. It is not until Bino makes Bina laugh that her smile returns. This is a sweet story about the changes that come with the arrival of a new sibling. The softly colorful illustrations are a pleasure to look at as the story unfolds. It would make an appropriate gift for any child who is going to become a "big" sister or brother. The book also offers a platform for parents to discuss the new arrival with their child.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 3
Papa and Mama Razzi call their daughter Principessa, "our princess bambina, our Bina." Papa snaps her picture, many times, every day. Then, bambino Pasquale is born ("our Bino"), and Principessa is jealous. She calls her brother "Boo Boo Bino," "Peeyew Bino," and "Burpy Baby Binky Bino" until threatened with a time-out. Papa photographs the siblings every day but Principessa does not like any of the pictures because Bino is in all of them. She decides she will never smile for photographs again. When the newspaper announces a contest for the child with the most beautiful smile, Papa gets his camera and Principessa hides in her closet. She refuses to come out no matter how hard her parents coax her. Then, Bino begins imitating his sister's angry faces. Unable to resist his comic efforts, she emerges, tells Bino to "Make this face," and smiles her best, most beautiful smile. Featuring characters in snazzy attire, the acrylic and pencil illustrations are delightful. Mama wears oversize turquoise cat's-eye eyeglasses and Papa sports a huge mustache. Principessa is enchanting even when she is angry. The tension in her shoulders is palpable and accentuates her facial expression. An engaging take on a common family situation.
—Linda StaskusCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Used to being the object of her parents' affection, a little girl doesn't like it when her new baby brother gets all the attention. From the time she was born, Principessa's Papa snapped pictures of her daily-a thousand photos each year! But after her brother Bino arrives, Papa's picture-taking mania suddenly shifts to the new baby. Principessa tries to smile "her very best smile" whenever Papa takes a photo of her with Bino, but she doesn't like these new pictures and decides she's not going to smile for any more. When Papa reads about a photo contest for the boy or girl with the most beautiful smile, Principessa assumes he will take Bino's picture. Disgruntled, she hides in her closet while everyone searches for her. In the end, Bino finds a way to make his sister smile. With humor and charm, Curmi's simple pencil-and-watercolor illustrations capture Principessa's rejection, envy and isolation. Guaranteed to trigger smiles, this gentle saga may provide a reassuring remedy for displaced siblings. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416910046
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
07/24/2007
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Read an Excerpt

Mama and Papa Razzi called him our boy bambino, our Bino.

His sister called him Boo Boo Bino, Peeyew Bino, and Burpy Baby Binky Bino until...

Mama said, "Talk nicely or you'll have a time-out, Principessa."

No one called her Bina anymore.

Text copyright © 2007 by Judith Ross Enderle and Stephanie Jacob Gordon But Principessa didn't like Papa's new pictures.

Not the park pictures, where she smiled her very best smile.

Not the zoo pictures, where she smiled her very best smile.

Not the beach pictures, where she smiled her very best smile.

She especially didn't like any pictures of her holding Bino.

Principessa decided she would never smile for pictures again.

Not ever!

Text copyright © 2007 by Judith Ross Enderle and Stephanie Jacob Gordon

Meet the Author

Judith Ross Enderle and Stephanie Jacob Gordon have been writing children's books as a team for several years. Their picture books include Something's Happening on Calabash Street and Two Badd Babies. Their writing has also been featured in the Los Angeles Times and in various magazines for children. Together Judith and Stephanie formed Writers Ink, where they work with other children's book authors. They both live in Ventura, California. Visit their Web site at www.writersinkville.com.

Judith Ross Enderle and Stephanie Jacob Gordon have been writing children's books as a team for several years. Their picture books include Something's Happening on Calabash Street and Two Badd Babies. Their writing has also been featured in the Los Angeles Times and in various magazines for children. Together Judith and Stephanie formed Writers Ink, where they work with other children's book authors. They both live in Ventura, California. Visit their Web site at www.writersinkville.com.

Serena Curmi was born in England and grew up on a sailboat, traveling with her family around parts of the United States, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean. She entertained herself on the boat by painting and drawing, which gave her the grounding to become an artist. Later she earned a degree in illustration from the Falmouth College of Arts in Cornwall, England. She currently resides in London.

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