Smithsonian Book of National Wildlife Refuges by Eric Jay Dolin, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Smithsonian Book of National Wildlife Refuges
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Smithsonian Book of National Wildlife Refuges

by Eric Jay Dolin
     
 

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In 1903 Theodore Roosevelt signed a proclamation that created the first of what, a century later, would become a system of 538 wildlife refuges spread across all fifty of the United States. Stretching from the cypress swamps of Okefenokee to the remote wilderness of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the refuges now occupy an amazing 95 million acres of the

Overview

In 1903 Theodore Roosevelt signed a proclamation that created the first of what, a century later, would become a system of 538 wildlife refuges spread across all fifty of the United States. Stretching from the cypress swamps of Okefenokee to the remote wilderness of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the refuges now occupy an amazing 95 million acres of the American landscape. These are America's most treasured natural habitats -- filled with waterfowl, fish, mammals, and a diverse array of plants. Coupling his text with the remarkable photographs of John and Karen Hollingsworth, Eric Dolin draws on the rich history surrounding the refuges to reveal an intriguing story of people and nature. After exploring how the fledgling conservation movement found its champion in Teddy Roosevelt, Dolin unveils a story filled with heroic, sometimes quirky, Americans who fought to preserve the nation's natural heritage. Following Roosevelt's lead -- and against a backdrop of the twentieth century's wars and strife -- refuge after refuge was created, resulting today in an incredibly diverse and biologically critical system that helped earn the United States its reputation as a leader in global conservation. One hundred years after Roosevelt's proclamation, the refuges stand as a testament to the beauty of natural America and an example of how our wildlife can be preserved for generations yet to come. The history and photographs found in the book entice us not only to visit our nearest refuge but also to reflect on what we are capable of achieving as a nation.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The clearly written text detailing the history of National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) makes a convincing argument for their continuance and expansion. Just as compelling are the Hollingsworths' photos, taken in habitats where plants, animals and insects are protected by law. Photos of red fox pups (Agassiz, Minn.), hatching tundra swans (Yukon Delta, Alaska), an endangered Florida panther, and the Beaver Dam (Fish Springs, Utah) are testaments to the importance of the conservation movement. The voices of nature preservationists of the 19th century, such as John Muir, who founded the Sierra Club and the Audubon Society, whose members fought vigorously against the wanton slaughter of birds in order to decorate women's hats, were heard by President Theodore Roosevelt. In 1903 Roosevelt, who had a deep love of nature and wildlife, launched the NWR system by designating Florida's Pelican Island as a preserve for native birds. Dolin (The Duck Stamp Story) spells out the growth of federal refuges, which have survived despite a lack of funding and shifting political fortunes. Ronald Reagan, for example, tried to expand commercial use of refuges, including timber operations and drilling for oil in Alaska. Jimmy Carter, however, was a friend to conservationists and supported the whooping crane project. In 1997, President Clinton signed the National Wildlife Refuge Improvement Act, which set forth the mission of the system to put the wildlife and ecosystems of the refuges before any other considerations. Color and b&w photos. (Mar.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Celebrating the centennial of the National Wildlife Refuge System, the network of federal lands dedicated to wildlife conservation, this guide captures not only the history but also the spirit, struggles, and evolution of the system. Key events, critical legislation, and important individuals are chronicled, with an attention to detail that engages the reader. Liberally illustrated with 200 color photographs (seen by this reviewer only in a black-and-white galley), the text includes an absorbing prehistory of the system and what led to its creation in 1903, changes and challenges, struggles to find direction, and recent critical legislation (e.g., the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997); also included are alluring profiles of eight representative yet varied refuges (e.g., the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, Alaska's ANWR preserve). Refuges are a critical part of wildlife conservation, and this outstanding book undoubtedly will serve the purpose of educating the public and garnering more support from them. Highly and enthusiastically recommended for all public libraries and all environmental collections.-Nancy Moeckel, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568527116
Publisher:
Konecky & Konecky LLC.
Publication date:
08/15/2008
Pages:
258
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.70(d)

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