Sneezenesia by Deb Lucke, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Sneezenesia
  • Alternative view 1 of Sneezenesia
  • Alternative view 2 of Sneezenesia

Sneezenesia

by Deb Lucke
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Once there was a boy who sneezed so hard, he forgot his own name. Then he sneezed again, and he forgot where he was, and who his mom was, and a whole bunch of other important stuff. Pretty soon he’d sneezed out everything he learned the entire year. ACHOO! . . . and spelling, math, and all the U.S. presidents came flying out of his nose. And things just got

Overview

Once there was a boy who sneezed so hard, he forgot his own name. Then he sneezed again, and he forgot where he was, and who his mom was, and a whole bunch of other important stuff. Pretty soon he’d sneezed out everything he learned the entire year. ACHOO! . . . and spelling, math, and all the U.S. presidents came flying out of his nose. And things just got worse from there. . . .
Humorous, understated text and outrageous, vividly colored illustrations tell how the boy gets everything he’s forgotten back into his head where it belongs, making for a tale that is truly sneezesational.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Lucke's choice of mixed-media illustration is well suited to the mishmash of knowledge that comes shooting out the boy's nose, green slime and spray sometimes accompanying them. Various perspectives give readers plenty of opportunity to see the action. Additional sneeze facts are listed on the rear flap, and the back cover sports some helpful (and humorous) warnings."—Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
Lucke's book about a boy named Zak who sneezed himself silly is likely to be one that some will love and others hate. On one hand, it could be condemned for being absurd and exaggerated, and for emphasizing the gross. Others will love it for those very qualities. Of course, the story might also get a sympathy vote from hay fever victims. Some adults and many children are likely to be greatly amused when Zak sneezes so hard that he forgets his own name, his mother, and virtually everything he knows. In fact, he sneezes so hard that he is literally transported back to the days of the dinosaurs. However, as Lucke's amusing cut-away illustrations of what goes on inside the skull show, one big sniff can be enough to bring everything back—including a green booger that is one of those dinosaurs. As that example might suggest, Lucke's illustrations have the same exaggerated, verging-on-bad-taste quality as the text. Whether a parent or a classroom teacher would find Lucke's approach amusing (and maybe even instructive) is very much a question of taste. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—"There once was a boy who sneezed so hard, he forgot his own name" begins this quirky, offbeat offering. The boy forgets almost everything he has learned—including "an entire hanky's worth of presidents"—as it all comes out of his head in sneezes at the supermarket (with some high kid-appeal green boogers attached to the image of Richard Nixon). The boy finally stops sneezing, and there is a fabulous picture of his emissions looking up at him imploringly, among them dinosaurs, Santa and his reindeer, Pilgrims, and numerals, wondering how they are supposed to "get back in." It turns out they get suctioned in with a simple sniff, which also pulls over the boy's mother from the other side of the market. She wipes his nose and finds a residual dinosaur, "a big green thing," dangling from his nostril. The artwork, done in paint, collage, and Photoshop, jumps off the page and adds pace and animation to the story. The supermarket mothers are worth a giggle with their retro outfits and accessories. This funny read-aloud could be paired with any version of "I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly" for a rousing storytime.—Alison Donnelly, Collinsville Memorial Public Library, IL
Kirkus Reviews
What might happen if a sneeze is too powerful? One young boy finds out in this imaginative tale. While grocery shopping with his mom, an attack of sneezes hits. With each "achoo," the boy loses more of his memories--first his name, then his mother. The numbers, Squanto and the Pilgrims, the presidents, the dinosaurs, his favorite baseball team and Christmas all end up scattered on the grocery floor. Like a balloon, his brain had gone empty. A tearful sniff provides the suction solution he needs for his memories and pulls his mother back to him...where she helps get rid of the green thing hanging out of his nose. Lucke's choice of mixed-media illustration is well suited to the mishmash of knowledge that comes shooting out the boy's nose, green slime and spray sometimes accompanying them. Various perspectives give readers plenty of opportunity to see the action. Additional sneeze facts are listed on the rear flap, and the back cover sports some helpful (and humorous) warnings. If nothing else, this cautionary tale may get readers to cover their sneezes in fear of forgetting something vital. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547330068
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/04/2010
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,083,508
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Deb Lucke once sneezed so hard she forgot her own name . . . but only for a second. She is also the author-illustrator of The Boy Who Wouldn’t Swim and other books, and lives in upstate New York. Visit her at www.deblucke.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >