Snivel: Where the Whiny Kids Go

Snivel: Where the Whiny Kids Go

4.5 11
by Dale E. Basye
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Dale E. Basye sends Milton and Marlo to Snivel, the circle reserved for crybabies, for their latest hilarious escapade in Heck. Snivel is a camp—a bummer camp—a dismal place where it's always raining, and Unhappy Campers are besieged by swarms of strange mosquitoes that suck the color right out of them. Soon the Fausters discover that some Unhappy

Overview

Dale E. Basye sends Milton and Marlo to Snivel, the circle reserved for crybabies, for their latest hilarious escapade in Heck. Snivel is a camp—a bummer camp—a dismal place where it's always raining, and Unhappy Campers are besieged by swarms of strange mosquitoes that suck the color right out of them. Soon the Fausters discover that some Unhappy Campers have been disappearing. So after Marlo gets chosen for a special project and never comes back, Milton makes up his mind to find her and all the missing children.

Can Milton find his sister and get the heck out of Snivel? With the help of some new friends, his pet ferret, and Vincent Van Gogh's ear, he just might have a chance.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Lona Trulove
"So please return your postures to their full-downright positions and extinguish all hope. We're in for a bumpy landing." Welcome to the Fifth Circle of Heck: Snivel. Marlo and Milton find themselves in Camp Snivel; a camp for whiny and mopey children where everything is upside down, gray, and thoroughly depressing. Bayse once again takes the reader on a ride full of puns and allusions. This time we meet Edgar Allan Poe and Vincent Van Gogh, both of whom are running the camp, as well as a monk named Abbot Costello, and we run into Bea "Elsa" Bubb, the Principal of Darkness, yet again. The puns abound, from the titles of the chapters, such as "Grinning from Fear to Fear" and "Look before You Weep," to the people they meet, like the Grin Reaper, who goes around stealing the children's laughs. Fighting against the sadness and depression everywhere around them, Milton and Marlo manage to make friends and find their way out of Camp Snivel, but not without adventure and obstacles along the way. This series of books would be a great way to teach students about allusions and puns. The stories in this series are engaging and funny, as well as appealing to both boys and girls. Bayse has created a series that will make adults and children realize that playing with language is fun and entertaining. Reviewer: Lona Trulove
Children's Literature - Judy DaPolito
In this fifth in the series of books about Heck, the place where bad children go after death, eleven-year-old Milton Fauster and his older sister Marlo are ferried by the SighTram to a new place of torment, Camp Snivel. Milton's pet ferret, Lucky, rides along in Milton's backpack. After Marlo disappears on a field trip, Milton and his cabin-mates rename themselves and become a tight group who look out for each other. Milton is Dork Knight, the conjoined twins become Sam/Sara, Mortimer Franzenburg becomes Howler Monkey, Tyler Skaggs becomes Sunshine Sneezer, and Jaslin Chunder becomes Caterwaul. These Unhappy Campers are chosen to play the Great Game in Arcadia, a video-game tower filled with color, light, and sound—a contrast to the overwhelming filth and stench of Camp Snivel. But the games are real, and the group must defeat huge, dangerous monsters whose beings are based in the five senses. As they proceed from level to level, they become aware that there are living children above them playing the same games in a casino and manipulating the Unhappy Campers as if they were avatars. While all this is going on, Marlo is placed in a tank of bad memory foam to be sent back home to make her parents and friends even unhappier. She is invisible, but able to communicate through texting. Ultimately, the siblings are reunited and, after having been witnesses at the trial of Satan, are sentenced by Judge Judas to Precocia. The book overflows with puns and with adult characters such as the Grin Reaper, Abbot Costello, Vice Principal Edgar Allen Poe, Bea "Elsa" Bubb, the Town Cryer, Johnny Cockroach, and Frequent Friar Miles.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375868344
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
05/22/2012
Series:
Heck Series
Pages:
448
Product dimensions:
5.84(w) x 8.38(h) x 1.42(d)
Lexile:
930L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

DALE E. BASYE has been a journalist, film critic, and publisher of an arts and entertainment newspaper. He lives with his wife and son in Portland, Oregon. Please visit his Web site at WheretheBadKidsGo.com to find out more.

BOB DOB draws inspiration from painter Edward Hopper, classic Disney, and Film Noir. He lives in Redondo Beach, California, where he draws, paints, and drinks coffee all day. For more on Bob and his art, visit BobDob.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Snivel: Where the Whiny Kids Go 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
awkwardchinchilla26 More than 1 year ago
Snivel: The Fifth Circle of Heck is yet another great entry into the wildly imaginative, hilarious romp through the underworld that is the Heck series. Launching with the wickedly funny “Heck: Where the Bad Kids Go” four years ago, Dale E. Basye introduced a sillier--and yet somehow creepier--section of the afterlife, which is inhabited by dead children who were particularly naughty during their days on earth. The latest installment concerns Snivel, the section of Heck reserved for the whiny, mopey and depressed. The clever, zany wordplay and bizarre, laugh-out-loud situations that ran rampant through the first four books are present here. The gate of Snivel is adorned with tragedy/tragedy masks and the world’s tiniest violins, and cafeteria specials include “woe-is-meatballs” as well as water filled with tears. And the vice principal of Snivel is none other than the late Edgar Allan Poe, whose tattle-tell-taling heart is still beating eerily. The Fauster siblings (eleven-year-old Milton and his older sister Marlo) have wreaked havoc in four of Heck’s circles, and in the previous installment unearthed a crime seemingly committed by the Big Guy Downstairs himself. Satan’s trial is one of the best comic scenes this series has offered so far, and the author’s gleeful satire of the spiritual world and divine powers does very well in being just the right amount of offensive to be ungodly funny (get it? Ungodly, because....never mind). That being said, there is no religious bashing whatsoever--merely a lot of biblical references. The book may not be aptly named, however, as only the first act of the book takes place in conventional Snivel. A wondrous land of video games called Arcadia is Milton’s setting for the second act, Marlo having been sent to the surface on secret business. And the chapters unrelated to either Fauster are great--our old friend Damian, Milton’s bully in life as well as death, returns, as does the pitiable-yet-despicable Principal Bea “Elsa” Bubb, and we are treated to another guest appearance from the author himself, whose sections are wickedly self-aware and satirical. Basye deserves kudos for such an entertaining ensemble cast of characters, even establishing new ones in Snivel effectively to the point that the reader forgets they were only introduced earlier this book. Overall, a great read, though I wouldn’t recommend reading it without being familiar with the other books. And as far as wordplay, pop culture references and puns go, it’s more of the same stuff--a LOT more. I’m sure I didn’t pick up on all of it. This is an engrossing read, silly yet undoubtedly surprisingly clever. The target audience may be children, but teenagers and even older folks may want to look into this series. It’s worth the ride.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is there a sixth?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heck is a good book for kids and teens. How do u come up with stuff like this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BEST BOOK EVER
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have never read it but i want to.soon