Snow in Jerusalem

( 4 )

Overview

Avi and Hamudi are two boys who live in Jerusalem's Old City—Avi in the Jewish Quarter and Hamudi in the Muslim Quarter. To each boy, the other's neighborhood is an alien land. Both are caring for the same beautiful white stray cat.

Although they live in different quarters of Jerusalem, a Jewish boy and a Muslim boy are surprised to discover they have been caring for the same stray cat.

Read ...
See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$6.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (30) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $2.25   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Avi and Hamudi are two boys who live in Jerusalem's Old City—Avi in the Jewish Quarter and Hamudi in the Muslim Quarter. To each boy, the other's neighborhood is an alien land. Both are caring for the same beautiful white stray cat.

Although they live in different quarters of Jerusalem, a Jewish boy and a Muslim boy are surprised to discover they have been caring for the same stray cat.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In her affecting but message-driven debut children's book, da Costa relays the story of two boys who live in Jerusalem's Old City Avi in the Jewish Quarter and Hamudi in the Muslim Quarter. A fluffy white cat wanders between the homes of the two boys, relishing the scraps each feeds her. Then weeks pass without any sign of the cat, alarming each boy. Looking skinny and dirty, the cat at last visits Avi, who then follows her to Hamudi's neighborhood, where the youngsters begin to argue, each claiming the cat is his. As a rare snowfall begins, the boys stop bickering and, fearing that the beloved animal will freeze, follow her through Jerusalem to a dark alley where they discover four kittens in a box. As the mother purrs loudly and rubs against the boys, they conclude, "She does not want us to fight.... She wants peace." The watercolor art by this husband-and-wife team (Mei-Mei Loves the Morning) balances precise, close-up portraits of the boys with softly focused backgrounds that depict the various cultural nuances of the setting. A glossary defines the Hebrew and Arabic words integrated into the text. Ages 6-10. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Peace in the world—who has not yearned for that? Peace in Jerusalem—can it really happen? Avi and Hamudi, who live in separate worlds in their Jewish and Muslim quarters of the Old City, seem to witness that miracles can still occur. The medium is a blue-eyed white cat whom they both are feeding, each unaware of the other's existence and role until kittens and a most unusual snowfall bring them all together. Naming and sharing the cat seems more reasonable than accusations and fighting over her, and so a friendship is born, hope flames in Jerusalem. This is a most believable story enfolded by wondrously warm and detailed watercolors, an armchair trip into that exotic, fabled and troubled city. Don't miss exploring it with Hamudi, Avi and the white cat. 2001, Whitman, $15.95. Ages 5 to 10. Reviewer: Judy Chernak
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-As the problems in the Middle East continue to rage, this didactic story of finding common ground and a way to make peace seems both simplistic and apropos. Both Avi, who lives in the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem, and Hamudi, from the Muslim Quarter, love the white stray cat they feed. After she disappears and reappears, Avi follows the feline and discovers Hamudi feeding her. As they argue about ownership, snow begins to fall, and she runs away. Predictably, when they find her, she has four new kittens, which they argue over and finally agree to share, each taking two of them home. The narrative flows smoothly, and da Costa's language makes the story seem more a legend or folktale than a modern tale. The watercolor-and-pencil illustrations are done in a realistic style that suits the narrative, but the boys look alike except for their different jackets and the fact that Avi wears a yarmulke. The endpapers, which depict the old city with the Wailing Wall and the Dome of the Rock practically touching, are quite effective. School libraries may want to consider this serviceable title for opening discussions about the Middle East.-Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In an innocuous, basically uninteresting story, two boys who are citizens of Jerusalem, an Israeli-Arab and an Israeli-Jew, discover that they've been caring for the same cat in their respective neighborhoods. As they quarrel over ownership, suddenly snow begins to fall. Realizing that they must both take care of the cat, they follow her through the streets until they discover that she has delivered four kittens, a miracle like the snow, they decide. Once again they begin to fight over who will take them home until the cat demonstrates that she loves them both. So, they divide the kittens and let the mother continue to travel between them. A map of the city on the title page will help readers understand the sections of the Old City and show what boundaries the boys crossed in the cat chase. Full-bleed watercolor illustrations really convey the mood and places of the ancient city, as well as the human beings-and cats. Jerusalem in not as clean as shown in the art, nor is the over-abundance of felines shown. But in a high-minded and good-hearted story, even these literal facts may be overlooked. Development, human and feline, is nicely characterized. (author's note, glossary) (Picture book. 6-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807575253
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 3/1/2008
  • Series: Albert Whitman Prairie Paperback Ser.
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 420,968
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.54 (w) x 9.89 (h) x 0.15 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    recommend

    After a two-week visit to Israel, I chose to purchase this book for my great-nieces and great-nephew and for our church library. We saw lots of cats roaming the streets in Old City Jerusalem. This story reemphasized for me the importance of people young and old from both sides getting to know each other in meaningful ways that will hopefully someday lead to peace.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2002

    Wow

    What a fantastic book! The message is so positive and uplifting. Bravo.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2002

    A wonderful book--especially for Jewish and Muslim kids

    A lovely story (beautifully illustrated) about compromise and understanding between two different kinds of people. This timely story tells a wonderful tale. While I would recommend it for all kids, it really is a MUST for Jewish and Muslim children. It would make a fabulous gift. Maybe if we could send copies of this book to all of the Israelis and Palestinians--well, you never know.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2002

    A Delightful Story/Beautiful Illustrations

    This book tells the story of two boys of differing faiths who learn to get along and solve a problem together. The illustrations are beautiful and depict the differing quarters in Jerusalem. A great teaching tool for young children that they will enjoy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)